Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1 Digital Camera

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Decrease the DOF

What's the best way to decrease the DOF for macro and portraits. I've set the camera to the macro and portrait icon and in all my shots background seems to be in focus.

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DOP decreases with longer focal lengths. This means you would want to stand further away from your subject and zoom in, instead of standing close and taking a wide angle shot. The macro mode is still a good idea, though.

Posted on Sep 06, 2005

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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My Fuji camera shows me the function P or SR Auto, what does it mean?


SR Auto stands for "Scene Recognition Auto" - This is Fuji's 6 scene-recognition function with fully loaded detection functions that detect faces, blinks and smiles for clear optimized people photos.

Framed scenes are automatically detected and selected into appropriate camera settings:
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Night
  • Macro (closeups)
  • Night Portrait
  • Backlit Portrait.
http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/s/finepix_s4200/features/page_02.html


Not sure where you're seeing "P", but this abbreviation is often used to designate "Program", and contains auto settings for various lighting conditions. I don't see this on the Fuji site or in reference to their camera's at all, though it is used on Sony digital cameras.

May 06, 2015 | Fuji FinePix Cameras

1 Answer

Can someone please help me! I'm trying to demonstrate the effects of depth of field using a Pentax Optio V15 camera for an assignment and I can't find f settings anywhere on this camera! Is there another...


Like most point&shoot cameras the V15 doesn't give you much direct control. You can use the Portrait mode to narrow the depth of field and the Landscape mode to deepen the DoF.

Be aware that with such a short lens you won't see much difference. The DoF is dependent on the actual focal length of the lens, not its 35mm equivalent.

Oct 14, 2013 | Cameras

1 Answer

I couldn't seem to blur my portrait backgrounds with the canon powershot a1200. can you help me with step by step instructions? does the a1200 have an AV mode at all? thanks


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth-of-field (DoF).

DoF is controlled by three factors: the aperture of the lens, distance to the subject, and the focal length of the lens. This has nothing to do with any particular design, it's simply physics.

The wider the aperture (smaller the f/number), the narrower the DoF. The A1200 does not have an Av mode which would let you control the aperture directly. However, it does have a Portrait mode, which is supposed to give you a wider aperture.

The closer you are to the subject, the narrower the DoF. This suggests that you get as close to the subject as practicable. However, in general you don't want to get too close for portraits as this tends to exaggerate certain facial features, like making noses look bigger.

The longer the focal length of the lens, the narrower the DoF. This suggests that you back away and zoom in. Yes, this conflicts with the previous paragraph.

Unfortunately, it's the actual focal length of the lens that matters here, not the "35mm equivalent" often quoted in the spces. The lens on the A1200 zooms from 5mm to 20mm. Landscape photographers like to use 24mm lenses on their 35mm cameras because that gives them practically infinite depth-of-field, from the flower in the foreground to the mountains in the background. The lens on your camera is shorter than that, so you're going to have a hard time blurring portrait backgrounds.

The best I can recommend is to put the camera into Portrait mode, put as much distance as possible between the subject and the background, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in to the longest focal length you have (remembering that the last two are in conflict).

Jun 14, 2011 | Canon A1200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My Sony A700 works ok in the P,A,S and M modes. However when set in Auto mode the lcd shows Portrait. When in Portrait it shows Portrait. When in Landscape the lcd shows Portrait. When in Macro it shows...


Has it been serviced before? I remember one A200 with a very similar problem. There was a flex cable broken inside - the owner had given it to another technician before me and he managed to brake it. I think it could be a bad connection or some liquid damage. I have worked in a Sony service center and I don't think this is some kind of a factory problem. Anyways, you will have to give it to a camera technician. The camera has to be taken apart to see what's what.

Jan 24, 2011 | Sony Alpha DSLR-A700

1 Answer

How do you take a pic with the Nikon d60 where the background is blurred?


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth of field. DoF is controlled by three factors: distance from camera to subject, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The closer the camera is to the subject, the narrower the DoF. The longer the lens focal length, the narrower the DoF. The larger the lens aperture, the narrower the DoF.

Get as close to the subject as practical, and use as long a focal length as practical. I realize these two aims conflict with each other. For portraits, you want a focal length in the 50-90mm range and move in to fill the frame.

You want to shoot with as wide an aperture as you can. Unfortunately most lenses are not at their sharpest wide open. Also, the 18-55mm lens doesn't open up all that wide, f/3.5 at 18mm and f/5.6 at 55mm. To get the widest aperture, you can shoot in the P or A modes. If you don't want to leave the point&shoot modes, try using the Portrait mode.

Since you're not paying for film, I suggest you experiment with the different settings and shooting setups, moving closer and farther from the subject, using different focal lengths, and using different apertures, and see what results you get.

Nov 22, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm lens

1 Answer

I want to take a picture that is focused on the subject, while everything else in the picture is blurry


What you want is a limited depth of field. There are three factors that control the depth of field: subject distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The greater the distance, the wider the DoF. The shorter the lens, the greater the DoF. The smaller the aperture, the greater the DoF.

One problem with compact cameras is that they have very small sensors. This means that they have short lenses. And short lenses mean they have wide depth of field. This is often an advantage, in that more of the scene is in focus. Unfortunately, this works against you when you don't want a wide DoF.

At the short end, the S2's lens focal length is 6mm. This will put just about everything in focus. Even at the other end, the focal length is 72mm. With a 35mm film camera, most portrait photographers use lenses at least 85mm in focal length in an attempt to minimize DoF to draw attention to the face and blur the background.

Unfortunately, the best you'll be able to do is to set the camera to the portrait mode, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in as much as possible. I realize the last two conflict with each other, you'll just have to find the proper balance for whatever you're photographing.

Nov 18, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to use the depth of field


Hi Michelle,

"Depth Of Field" (or DOF) is the amount of distance both in front and behind the point of focus that is also in focus. If there is a very short distance or range of an area that is in focus, it is said to have a shallow depth of field. This shallow DOF is achieved by setting the aperture or "f stop" to the wider or lower number settings. The smallest f stop number will provide the shallowest DOF. The DOF will become broader ir deeper with each increasing f stop setting.

Shallow DOF settings are often used in portraits where the background is desired to be blurred. It is also used in macro (extreme close up) photography, and anywhere a blurred foreground / background is desired.

The down side of this is that the shutter speed will increase proportionately, to maintain a properly exposed image. If you are trying to convey a sense of motion - by allowing the subject to be blurred slightly - you'll have some trouble due to the fast shutter speed. Neutral density filters fixed to the lens can correct this. The other side of the coin is in an indoor and evening outdoor photography. If you're not using a flash, you'll likely have to be shooting more towards the "open end" of the lens (more towards the lower number aperture settings) which while allowing enough light for an good exposure - will also reduce the DOF. Some people or objects in front of and behind the focus point will not be a sharp as a result.

The best thing to do is experiment. set a number of object on a surface - 2', 3' 4' 5' and 6' away from the camera. A tripod or other solid surface can help a great deal. Set the camera up for a "normal" exposure in a full manual or Aperture Priority Mode of the middle object 4 feet away. Take a picture. Next, open the aperture (make the number smaller) and adjust the shutter (if in manual) to expose properly again. Take the picture. Keep doing this both BOTH directions for the aperture from the first "Normal" exposure. Compare the results to see exactly how the DOF changes. Tinker with shutter speeds - or don't change them. Notice that with each time you open the f stop, the shutter must speed up to compensate for more light entering the camera due to the wider aperture setting (and vice versa).

I hope I understood your question correctly and that this helped.

Oct 11, 2010 | Cameras

3 Answers

Difference between Auto Picture/Program Mode


Auto Picture-selects on of the picture mode such as landscape(mountain), macro(flower), sport/action(running man) mode, etc. P-sets shutter and aperture. You set everything else. happy face- sets shutter, aperture and everything else.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Scene modes


Program Auto Landscape Landscape + Portrait Portrait Indoor Sport Beach & Snow Behind Glass Self Portrait + Self Timer Self Portrait Sunset Night Scene Night+Portrait Cuisine Documents Candle Under Water Wide Under Water Macro Shoot & Select 1 / U Shoot & Select

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus ? Stylus 500 Digital Camera

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