Question about Canon Optura 500 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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Ripples appear in the image when photographing an object with fine plaids or stripes. Why is that?

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The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly. Reference You may find another Moire effect displayed on the LCD of the camera. As this is caused by the aligned pixels on the LCD, this effect does not necessarily appear in pictures you have taken.

Posted on Sep 04, 2005

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Ripples in the edges


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Ripples appear in the image when photographing an object with fine plaids or stripes. How can I fix that?


When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red cross-stripes and black cross-stripes overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly. Reference You may find another Moire effect displayed on the LCD of the camera. As this is caused by the aligned pixels on the LCD, this effect does not necessarily appear in pictures you have taken.

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1 Answer

Picture ripples


The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the fine pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red stripes and black plaids overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly.

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1 Answer

Picture ripples


The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the fine pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red stripes and black plaids overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly.

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Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

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