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Got a steam heating system (oil burner) with water on pipes and makes noise. How do I drain it?

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Water hammering! Try replacing your vacuum breaker!

Posted on Aug 26, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Model HO-0250H, heater makes a pair of snapping noises one after the other, perhaps from expansion/contraction. Heater is two months old.


The unit uses oil to create residual heat. The oil can contain small amounts of moisture and when the unit heats that moisture turns to steam, Steam has a great expansion ratio. When the steam condenses back to moisture it can conglomerate into large water droplets instead of being dispersed. This means that when it heats back up the steam expansion is more radical and makes noise. Unless the unit starts leaking oil, it is fine to continue using it.

Feb 20, 2014 | Pelonis Heating & Cooling

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What are the differences between a steam and hot water radiator


If you have a steam heating system and want to convert it to hot water or if you have a hot water system and want to go steam, you need to first find out if the radiators are compatible with the new system. If you are buying used radiators for your hot water or steam system, how do you know if they will work with your system?

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The first rule to remember is that hot water will ALWAYS take two openings into the radiator. Usually they will be in the bottom, but I have hooked up radiators with the supply going into the top of the radiator and the return out the bottom. A small taping will also be needed for an air vent. This will release the air from the radiator so that it fills completely with water.

For steam it will depend on the type of steam system that you have. If you have a two pipe steam system you will need two openings and they do need to be in the bottom. For two pipe systems you will also have to fit a steam trap on the return side of the radiator. A valve on the inlet is a very good idea also. For one pipe steam systems you will need only one opening at the bottom. However you will also need to have a tapping for a small vent towards the top of the radiator to release air from the radiator. There is no trap on a one pipe steam system, but an inlet valve is still a great idea to be able to control the heat output of the radiator.

There are many styles and configurations of radiators made. Many can be used for both hot water and steam heating. Some cannot be used for one or the other. You do need to checkout the radiator to make sure that it can be used for your intended heating system.

I have already drilled and tapped radiators to make them suitable to use for the style of system that I want. Make sure if you do this that there is a space where they can be drilled and taped properly. Many radiators already have a spot for the tapings that you need.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r4001015-bleed_radiator

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3904286-steam_system_steam_radiator_air

on Jan 30, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

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Hot Water Steam Efficiency Plus Comfort


Steam heat is a great warm, wonderful, and absolutely fabulous way to heat your house. Steam heat is almost always created from water in a boiler fueled by gas, oil or electricity. It then passes through pipes and radiators or convectors to heat your home. A steam heating system uses steam that is generated from a boiler. When the water boils, the steam rises through the pipes and into the radiators to heat them. The hot radiators then heat your home.

Steam is a great heat distribution medium because it moves easily through your system and it has an extremely high heat-holding capacity. The heat-holding capacity of steam is much greater than that of water. Steam heating systems often operate at very low pressures and usually under 220°F. Steam heat is usually distributed by either one or two pipe systems. In a case of a one-pipe steam heating system, a single main serves the dual purpose of supplying steam to the heat exchanger and allowing condensate to run back from the radiators also. A two-pipe system has two connections from each heat exchanger or radiator. In this system, steam and condensate flow in separate piping from each other. With a steam system all pipes must be well insulated and you must use pipe insulation rated for steam piping. If the insulation is removed the system will no longer work as designed. Noise and all sorts of problems will come from uninsulated piping.

When you have radiators on upper floors or radiators that are further from the boiler they should be adjusted to release more air to compensate for the increased air volume in the piping due to the distance from the boiler. If you have a valve that is clogged with mineral deposits or stuck shut, no air will be able to get out of the piping. Because of this no steam can enter the radiator, so it doesn't heat up. This will block the movement of steam into the radiator, or cause a very noisy hammering as pressurized steam tries to get through this water "dam".

Steam radiators need to have a valve that allows air to escape at a controlled rate so that the radiator can heat up. Steam heating systems will also lose a little bit of water all the time, so there has to be water makeup so that you do not run your boiler dry. Steam heating systems without an automatic water feeder are not safe. You will risk serious boiler damage should boiler water be lost. If the boiler runs dry it could also explode if water is placed into it while it is hot. There should always be a low water cutoff installed on every steam system. Therefore on a steam boiler the automatic water feeder serves as a safety device also.

It is very important that you find someone that is very familiar with steam heating systems when repairing or installing steam heating. Incorrectly designed, installed, steam systems and condensate piping is a huge problem in today's buildings and facilities. There are not many qualified to design and install properly operating steam heating systems. Incorrect steam piping will always cause costly premature failure of steam equipment such as steam coils, heat exchangers, and control valves. Not to mention the higher cost of operating a system that is not working efficiently.
http://www.fixya.com/support/r3904286-steam_system_steam_radiator_air

http://www.fixya.com/support/r4008078-differences_between_steam_hot_water

on Dec 29, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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Where do i add the water


A rice cooker is designed to heat the water to steam, infusing the rice (or vegetables) with moisture, and removing the excess water by evaporation. Your rice cooker may or may not have come with a steam tray (used to keep the items you want to steam out of the water, but still allow them to heat via the steam). It most likely did come with a deep bowl with a non-stick coating. This is where you pour the rice and the water. Make sure to put the lid on and turn it on when all ingredients are inside the nonstick bowl. Place the bowl inside the electric burner (or the cooker). I would add a little bit of oil to the water to improve texture and stickiness.

Jun 11, 2012 | Sunpentown SC-1811 Rice Cooker

1 Answer

I have a 50 gal rheem water heater, its making a clicking noise i have discovered if i shut off the cold water supply it stops, when i turn it back on then the clicking starts again, my t&p has popped...


sediment build up is usually causes thumping and noises from tank. it needs flushed out. models, where the heat source is beneath the tank. The burner heats the water under the sediment, leading to a build of steam. The steam finally escapes as bubbles, which can cause the sounds.

have a good day !

Mar 14, 2011 | Rheem Water Heaters

2 Answers

I have a lot of noise coming from the pipes i have bleed the air valves from the registers and still have the noise


you can not bleed air from a air con system like you can a radiator in your home its against the law the system will need to have the gas removed checked for leaks put on a vacum then recharged bleeding will not work

Jan 21, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have a 5 -7 yr old burnham gas burner for steam heat. I am frequently needing to put more water than normal and notice the pipes bang now also,what do you think could be wrong? thank you


When was the last time the unit was drained and flushed? Also the feeder may be stuck closed if it has one. Check all the steam vents to make sure thay are letting steam out of them. If not, replace the ones that are not. The banging is thermal shock (Steam hitting cooler water in the pipes). For some reason all the water may not be draining back to boiler.

Jan 15, 2010 | Honeywell CT87B ROUND HEATING&COOLING...

1 Answer

NOISE IN PIPES-HOT WATER HEAT


you have to bleed the system

Feb 14, 2009 | Plumbing

1 Answer

2002 pontiac grand prix over heating


Are your electric fans engaging or turning on?

Dec 26, 2008 | 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix

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