Question about Fuji FinePix S3 Pro Digital Camera

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Sharpening techniques??

I have no experience sharpening these files. Supposed I want to print an 12x18 image of a 12MP file, at native resolution of 235 pixels per inch. What's the best way to sharpen these files? S-CCD images look pretty ugly at 100% on screen, so it's hard to judge by eye what is the best sharpeing technique. So what has been your experience? Which method will produce the best prints? Traditionally, with 20D images, I have just sharpened by eye, making the images look just a bit oversharpened on screen at 100%. But it's hard to judge these Fuji files becuase they already look kind of raggedy at 100%, 12MP. -- Want to see realistic skin tones, excellent sharpness, and the tonality of a 14 bit ADC? A 100% crop:

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Re: Sharpening techniques??

Personally, for pictures with people in, I use the PS CS RAW converter with sharpening set to 20. Thats it. I have used 101 different sharpening techniques in the past, have decided that less is definitely more.

Posted on Sep 04, 2005

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Re: Sharpening techniques??

I have been using a bit of edge sharpening lately in combination with smaller & smaller amounts of overall USM. I know Thom Hogan's CD for the S2 had his version as a PS Action and there are others that do the same around. I eventually made my own custom action for it. Can be used most effectively to sharpen an image while leaving noisy areas alone.

Posted on Sep 04, 2005

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My SX10 is supposed to have a maximum of ten megapixil but no matter if I set it at ten or any setting above the minimum it always takes the picture at the minimum megapixil. Where am I going wrong?


You aren't doing anything wrong, set your camera at the highest resolution and you will have a "large" picture file. If you are shooting jpg format then it's a compressed file from the actual "RAW" file that was produced. However RAW files require special programing to open and use while jpg file format is the "standard" to which all printers and other devices work. I have an 8 meg camera that constantly produces 4, 5 and 6 meg photo files in jpg format and from this I can print and have printed poster size images from 20x30 and 36x40.

Feb 08, 2011 | Canon PowerShot SX10 IS Digital Camera

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DIFFERENCE BETWEEN JPG..AND RAW??????


The RAW file contains all the data as captured by the sensor. The JPG is processed, applying the white balance, sharpening, contrast, and other settings as set on the camera. You can change the settings on a RAW file and produce new JPG files at will. If you're going to be doing much work with the picture, you're much better off starting from the RAW.

An imperfect analogy is to think of the RAW file as the negative and the JPG as a print produced from the negative.

Nov 30, 2010 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

A list and defintion of the file types raw b, raw, fine, norm and basic


The D3000 can store still images in two different formats. JPEG is a standard format, recognized by just about every image viewer and image manipulation program in the world. RAW is actually NEF (Nikon Electronic Format), a Nikon-proprietary format which incorporates almost all of the data captured by the sensor, without the processing of JPEG. JPEG files have the color balance, sharpening, contrast, and all the other camera settings done on the picture. With RAW files, you can change any or all of them and produce new JPEGs. In this respect the RAW file is similar to the original negative you get from processed film, while the JPEG file is like the final print. RAW files need special software for viewing and editing.

All JPEG files are compressed to save space. FINE, NORM, and BASIC represent different levels of compression. FINE does the least compression and takes up the most space, BASIC does the most compression and takes up the least space. Compression always loses some quality, so in general the less the compression the better the quality.

RAW+B simply stores each of your pictures as a RAW file and a BASIC JPEG file.

Having said all that, you should use only RAW or FINE settings. You didn't buy a SLR only to throw away picture quality, did you?

Oct 25, 2010 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures taken are not sharp


If you are upgrading from a previous "point and shoot" digital camera, the pictures from your digital SLR may seem "soft" by comparison. This is simply a difference in the built-in processing performed by the camera. Most DSLRs output images with less sharpening applied. I believe the philosophy is that the sharpening algorithm causes data loss, so less of it is used on the high-end cameras with the assumption that you can apply more later on your PC.
You can try shooting a picture using the RAW capture mode, then editing it using a program on your PC. By applying sharpening to the RAW image, you will most likely be able to produce a very sharp image.
You can also take a JPEG image with the camera and apply additional sharpening on the PC, but this process is more lossy with regards to the original data.

May 20, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital SLR Camera Digital...

1 Answer

Raw file quality not as good as jpeg


RAW quality will always be at least as good as JPEG quality. The reason your JPEGs are coming out sharper is that the camera is actually doing post-processing on the RAW data, performing sharpening, white balance, contrast and brightness adjustment, etc., before saving the JPEG. The RAW data, as the name implies, is taken straight from the sensor, without the sharpening and other post-processing applied to it.

May 04, 2008 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A2 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Ripples in the edges


It's an inevitable consequence of using a low resolution jpeg. Try setting your computer monitor to VGA resolution (640x480) and you'll make a similar mess of images it displays - only worse, because the large screen blows up the image. You should use a higher resolution setting and invest in a bigger memory card for the camera if need be.

Sep 13, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE F300 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Confused about Resolution Sony DSC-T7


2.2 MB is the size of the file on your hard disk. Being a .jpg, it is a compressed file. The file size does not reflect the size of the image stored inside the .jpg. Yes, the size sounds about right. It will increase or decrease depending on how much detail there is in the picture. If, for instance, your picture is made up of nothing but uninterrupted blue sky, the disk file will be quite small - as the .jpg does not need to store much information (the more repetitive information, the smaller the file). On the other hand, if your photo consists entirely of nothing but blades of grass, the disk file will be comparatively large. When you see "DPI", that refers to print resolution. So, since you're not printing, but rather, viewing onscreen, Photoshop "assumes" a convenient "screen resolution", as though you printed on the screen (don't ask!). If you look at the other settings, you'll note that Photoshop also thinks your photo is 36" wide!!! You adjust the DPI (or photoshop will) when you print. Till then, it doesn't mean much. Let me give you an idea of your image's possible DPIs. Assume you really want to print a 36" photo: 2592/36" = 72 DPI If you make the picture 12" wide: 2592/12" = 216DPI At 10": 2592/10" = 259.2 DPI At 8" 2592/8" = 324 DPI How do you get my photos above 200 DPI? By printing the picture small enough, less than 12.96" on the wider side. See calculations above. The resolution at which you shot the image (2592X1944), will not cause blurriness. As for the cause? There could be any number. Was the subject moving? Were you? Did you shake the camera while shooting? Is your shutter speed too slow? Should you have been using flash? Is the camera autofocusing correctly? Are you waiting for the autofocus to lock before pushing the shutter the rest of the way? Etc. Hope this helps somewhat...

Sep 12, 2005 | Sony DSC-T7 Digital Camera

3 Answers

*ist RAW converter problem


Ignoring the JPEG artifacts, which isn't about the extra grain in both the TIFF and JPEG images produced by the convertor, is it possible that different sharpness settings were used for the output images that for the on screen review? High values of sharpening without using an appropriate noise threshold value will have the effect of increasing noise/grain.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist D Digital Camera

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