Question about Canon EOS Rebel G 35mm SLR Camera

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Poor quality photographs

Hi
I have a Canon 10 megapixel EOS SLR digital.
I also have a small Kodak 4 megapixel digital.
I thought I would get better photos from my Canon, but they are often dark. I take both cameras with me when I travel, and take 'record' shots with the Kodak, and try to get the good shots with my Canon. But when I download both cameras to my computer (a Mac with iPhoto) every time, the photos from the little Kodak are better. 
The Canon shots are dull, and often quite dark. The only time I get good photos is in low light, when the auto flash works eg. on walks in a dark rainforest.
I bought the Canon in Korea and the user manual is in Japenese. I have downloaded an English version from the net, but have not been able to find anything that  could help me.
Please, what can I do? I know I have a good camera in the EOS, but I'm not getting the results I want.

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  • John LeFebvre May 11, 2010

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I think this is down to your choice of lens. If you have the kit lens, it is pretty poor unless in bright sunlight. You could try keeping the shutter open longer using AV+/- or increasing the ISO but this increases the chance of a blurry photo. Remember the sensor on the Canon is huge compared to the Kodak - so more light will need to enter the lens to expose it properly. This is why SLR lenses are huge compared to compact cameras.

Posted on Mar 18, 2009

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I have kodak printer 5210. when i print a picture on 4x6 card. it looks good. but when i try 8x10.5 it doesn't look good. It looks little blurry.


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Can you use a memory card


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Want to purchase a DIGITAL CAMERA


10,000 what? Unless you specify the exact currency the number means absolutely nothing.

As to recommending the "best option" for you, the question is "best for what?"

The answer is rather more complicated as it all depends upon what your level of photographic skills and experience are, whether you have any special requirements (e.g. small and compact, waterproof, rugged, extra wide angle, large aperture "fast" lens, etc.) and whether you want a camera which you can choose which lens to use for each shot or a camera fitted with a single lens which covers wide to telephoto ranges. The former type would typically be a SLR, the latter is referred to a a bridge camera. Even then, there are traditional "full frame" SLR's which are bigger, bulkier and use bigger heavier lenses, regular "APS-C" digital SLR's which are a little smaller with less bulky lenses, the smaller Four Thirds SLR's from Olympus and Panasonic or there are the SLR styled "Micro Four Thirds" cameras which can look like an SLR but have interchangeab;e lenses which are smaller again. All true SLR's have an optical viewfinder which shows you the actual view through the lens, everthing else has either an EVF (electronic viewfinder), no viewfinder at all (just an LCD screen), or may have an optical finder which does not show the exact view through the lens.

Big, bulky cameras attract attention, so your subject may behave differently or even aggressively to your attempts to take photographs, but a smaller and more compact camera (especially if it doesn't look "professional") may get you the exact results which you want.

Perhaps you mean "best value"? Again, that's impossible to answer without knowing more. Some cameras offer loads of bells and whistles but are poorly built, difficult to use, or have a cheap lens which gives poor optical quality. Or all of those problems.

One thing is certain: spending more money on the most expensive camera you can afford will waste your money and will not make you a better photographer. It's the person behind the camera who makes the difference, not the box of tricks in front of his or her face. What does make a difference though is the quality of the lens, but even then this will be relatively unimportant if all you plan to do is to post photos to websites or to view them on your computer. A good lens only makes a difference if you have prints made to large sizes.

Maybe you meant "best number of megapixels"? Similarly, not easy to answer. There's been a megapixel race between manufacturers lately based on the false consumer belief that more are better. It's absolute nonsense as most amateur photographers will be fine with three megapixels: with a decent lens this gives perfectly good prints up to A4 size. Five megapixels is better if you want to make selective enlargements, but after that there is a definite trade-off as the larger megapixel imagers suffer badly with electronic "image noise" and they then have to employ all sorts of tricks to try and disguise the problem.

I strongly suggest that you visit a number of photographic websites and even more strongly suggest that you buy a few photography magazines for a few months (or read them for free if your local public library keeps them). A bit of research will help you to understand exactly what YOU want and at what price. If you still can't decide, them come back here, ask a better question with relevant details, and you'll get a useful answer.

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I want a nature camera


First, to answer your lens question, 400mm is unlikely to be adequate. On a digital camera this is going to give only 6x magnification. Some nature subjects will require much more than that.

Also, do not need a fully featured 'pro' camera. These have features which you may not want. Look at lenses first, and let that dictate the camera.

It rather depends on your intended subject matter, but in general for nature photography (I presume you are thinking of vertebrate animals, rather than plants or insects.) you require very long focal length lenses. This is because wild animals are very difficult to approach, and many are comparatively small as well. As an example, you may only be able to get within 30ft of a heron however well you are hidden, and for a bird that size at that distance a 400mm lens will just be big enough. Just.

As a rule you want to fill the frame. So to work out what focal length you need you need to work out the size of the image in the camera. This is not difficult to work out, as the magnification is only the ratio of the subject to lens distance to the (Thoeretical) film/sensor to lens distance. (Most long lenses are physically shorter than their theoretical focal length. That's the true origin of the word 'telephoto', the lens is optically 'telescoped' into a shorter package.)

In reality this varies a little as the lens moves in and out to focus it, but in practice you just use the focal length of the lens. So for out Heron which is about 10,000mm away with a 400mm lens the magnification is 400/10,000 = 4/100 =.04. A heron is about .5m tall (18inches roughly), and 500mm x 0.05 = 20mm. The hieght of a digital sensor is about 16mm, so that's full height, but a heron is a tall bird, so portrait mode might be better, and that will be closer to 24mm.

So in our example, a 400mm lens will do but only for an animal half a meter in size, if you can get thirty feet away. And that's pushing your luck. (The nearest I ever got to a heron without sitting all day in a hide hoping for it to show was twice that distance!)

Most subjects will be smaller, or further away. Getting within 150ft of a deer in clear view is quite a challenge even for an expert stalker. At 1.5m tall with a 400mm lens, the image will be 12mm high. If the subject is a grizzly bear, then I doubt you would want to be that close.

Of course if you are wanting to photograph smaller animals, then the problem is compounded. Especially if they are easily spooked.

In essence you want as long a lens as you can manage, so you can photograph from a comfortable (for the amimal) and safe (grizzly bear) distance. However, as in many instances you won't be able to control that, and the range of animals you want to photograph will vary in size, you really want either more than one lens, or a really good zoom.

Really good zooms of long focal length are very expensive, so two lenses might be a better option, or a long lens with a factory matched multiplier would be almost as good. (Zoom lenses cannot perform at optimum over all the focal lengths available, so really good ones are difficult to design and make.)

So you first need to decide what focal lengths you need.

Then you have to consider camera shake. As a rule of thumb you need an absolute minumum shutter speed of 1/(focal length in mm) for hand-held shots. As you will be using long lenses, with small apertures, you won't be able to take shots hand held.

One (partial) solution is to use an image stabilized or shake reduced system.

Image stabilization is built into the lens, and works by moving optical elements to compensate for vibrations. This makes the lenses much more expensive, and will eat batteries. This has the advantage that it is always optimal for the lens.

Shake reduction moves the sensor in the camera, to achieve the same effect. It makes the camera a little more expensive, but the lenses are a lot cheaper, and that's where most of your money will go!

(Note, that digital image shake compensation is not the same thing, and reduces the image sharpness.)

Of course the traditional solution is a really sturdy tripod. Most tripods are simply not up to the job, so you need to check out as many reviews as you can. But be aware a really good tripod will not be cheap.

The camera mount must be really rigid if the camera is not to move during exposure (A camera with a mirror-up function can help. The mirror is the Major source of vibration in a camera, this allows the mirror to flip well before the shutter fires allowing time for vibration to die away.) and the tripod itself must not flex or twist.

A tripod with the means of suspending a weight underneath is useful, extra weight will make sure the tripod feet are firmly placed and help pre-stress the tripod so any residual 'slack' is taken up. (A simple hook that you can hang a kit-bag on will suffice!)

A good tripod and head could cost £200 or more alone!

As for selecting the lenses....

Canon do some very long focal length lenses but they are also very expensive (£2000+) These include a zoom with image stabilization, and a dedicated multiplier to double the range. A good used example will cost over £1000.

However, you should be aware that Canon are generally quite expensive, and other manufacturers produce similar systems, at various prices. I would look at Nikon, and Pentax, these brands are still well regarded.

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