Question about Canon PowerShot G5 Digital Camera

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Dark Pictures I have been trying to photograph nite shots of the exterior of my house with the landscape lighting on. I am trying to use slower shutter speeds with a tripod and timer but they still keep coming out dark. Any assistance on settings (shutter speed, aperature or other) would be greatly appreciated.

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Re: Dark Pictures

Registered: Aug 2004 Location: Posts: 14 Night Shots - G5 Hi For best results 1) Shoot in RAW mode (use the Menu settings) 2) Use the Timer for taking Snapshots. This will allow the tripod and camera to stop moving once u pressed the shutter button. OR Use the Remote control 3) F8 is a good aperture. I think the ideal Shutter speed would be around 6 seconds. Depends on the Artificial Lighting u have on your house. I hope this helps.

Posted on Aug 31, 2005

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Re: Dark Pictures

I suggest to try setting your camera to manual exposure mode then choose an aperture around f.8 then set your shutter speed at something like 2 seconds. Shoot and see if it's too dark. Still too dark, then add more seconds to the shutter speed. Hope this helps. PS don't forget your white balance settings.

Posted on Aug 31, 2005

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Re: Dark Pictures

I've tried some night shots, and I would either adj the exposer compensation level, or you can lower the ap value witch would increase the diaphragm opening. try this out and tell what you get. I believe you can adjust your iso settings, too much you might get some digital noise.

Posted on Aug 31, 2005

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