Question about Polaroid Digital Cameras

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Anytime i take picture with my polaroid 500 it always turns out white. I have tried various things like adjusting white background to tungsten daylight auto etc but to no avail.I have also tried flash on off and auto but no change. please help.

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Hello!!

try resetting once!!!!! remove the battery and press the power button for few seconds and replace the batteries and try switching on!!!!

Posted on Aug 24, 2008

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IS THERE A WAY TO TURN UP BRIGHTNESS? I CAN HARDLY SEE WHAT I AM TRING TO TAKE A PHOTO OF.


Welcome to FixYa.

We have an option to change the White balance for pictures. In this option you can change it when shooting under these conditions:
* Automatic Djustment
* Outdoor daylight
* Cloudy
* Indoors. illuminated by tungsten lighting
* Indoors, illumunated by fluorescent lighting.

You just have to click here and refer to page 32 for the steps on how to chage the seetings.

Feel free to send us your feedback if this solution was helpful.

Thank you for using FixYa.

Apr 07, 2011 | Polaroid a300 Digital Camera

1 Answer

White balance on D50 set correctly?


Are you saying that you're using a white background but it doesn't appear white in the pictures? If so, then yes, you need to change the white balance to match the light. Probably "tungsten" but you could try different settings and pick the one you like best or you could use a white piece of paper and set a manual white balance.

Oct 24, 2009 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

White background on pictures taken from Canon PowerShot S1 IS


This sounds like it might be a defective CCD imager. If so, Canon should fix this for you for free, including free shipping both ways. This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please check the following two links for more info:

http://camerarepair.blogspot.com/2007/11/canon-digital-cameras-showing-black.html

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=PgComSmModDisplayAct&fcategoryid=225&modelid=13390&keycode=2112&id=29819

Applicable cameras include:
A40, A60, A70, A75, A80, A85, A95, A300, A310, S1 IS, S60, S200, S230, S330, S400, S410, S500, SD100, SD110, IXUS V2/300/400/430/500, IXY Digital 200a/300a/400/450/500

Feb 07, 2009 | Canon PowerShot S1 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have green shade in my pictures


kr77,
First you can adjust the images that have been taken in one of many software programs available and you may even have one if it came with your camera, if you have Photoshop Elements you can open the images and color correct them, if you or someone you know that has the Full version of Photoshop you can really make serious adjustments and corrections, providing of course how good a friend they are and if they are willing to help you out. Even if the card sat around for a couple of years it shouldn't affect the images. The green cast thing with the flash is really dependent on what type of camera you are using and if it's the built-in flash or an add-on flash unit on a DSLR camera, can you provide alittle more info so I can help you further?
randy320sgi

Jan 06, 2009 | Polaroid i835 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

SD450 all the taken pictures are bright white, but video mode still works


Sounds to me like your auto white balance is on the fritz.

First thing I would do is reset the camera. This is a fairly easy procedure which involves either going into your setup menu and choosing "reset," holding down the menu key for 5 seconds, or, removing the batteries for a few minutes. It may be that the firmware loading got corrupted and the camera just needs to be "rebooted," which is something that turning it on/off won't accomplish. But after which, you should have the camera reset to factory default settings.

Another tip is to go to Canon's website and look for firmware updates. Download and install them.

If that doesn't work, see what happens on the various other settings like cloudy, daylight, tungsten, etc. Then try setting a custom white balance.

If all else fails, you may be looking at a servicing/repair and with the average repair costing $180, if your warranty is expired it may cost more to repair than it's worth. The rule of thumb is that if the estimate for repair is north of 50% what you paid for it, you're better off taking that money and buying a newer and upgraded model.

JD
Digital-Camera HQ

Dec 01, 2007 | Canon Powershot SD450 / IXUS 55 Digital...

2 Answers

Green pictures panasonic fz7


Check the WHITE BALANCE settings and the COLOR EFFECTS settings (marked as W. BALANCE and COL. EFFECTS when MENU is pressed).

When you got to the MENU setting, press up or down arrow until you reached either selection, press the left arrow, and you'll see several options under the selected function. In WHITE BALANCE, there's an option whether you'll be shooting under sunny or cloudy skies, tungsten or flourescent lighting, and an option to select Auto or Manually set White Balance. This affects the over all color tone as it compensates the color correction depending on your shooting conditions. Fluorescent lighting for example exhibits blue spectrum, thus setting White Balance to FLUORESCENT will add warm or yellow tones to the photo. Tungsten lighting and sunny conditions exhibits yellow lighting, and setting to the White Balance on this mode will add cool or bluish tone to the picture.

Same with COLOR EFFECTS: settings include WARM, COOL, SEPIA or BLACK AND WHITE (gray scale).

Chances are, you have accidentally set the WHITE BALANCE or COLOR EFFECTS to any of these. To see if this is the problem, try shooting under SIMPLE MODE (Marked with a HEART icon at the rotary dial on top right of the DMC-FZ7). If the problem goes away, then it is with the WHITE BALANCE and the COLOR EFFECTS settings. Try setting the COLOR EFFECTS to "OFF", and the WHITE BALANCE to "AUTO".

If all else fails, then you got a problem with the image sensor of your Panasonic DMC-FZ7 Digicam


MANNY DE GUZMAN, JR.
SoundMagik Home Studio
Manila, Philippines
Site Creator, TEENMODELS2007
http://teenmodels2007.wetpaint.com/

Sep 27, 2007 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

White balance settings and color temperature


Canon has a chart of the approximate settings they use in their manual. it states.. daylight - 5200 shade - 7000 cloudy/twilight/sunset - 6000 tungsten - 3200 white flourescent - 4000 flash - 6000

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon PowerShot A70 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Color Problems


I know this contribution might be late, but try to avoid using the auto white balance. Use a tungsten mode and test each of its compensations until you get the desired result. I haven't had a similar problem on the 14n, but my D100 always places a magenta cast on white when shooting auto WB. I learned how to adapt the other WB modes to any situation.

Sep 13, 2005 | Kodak DCS 14n Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures reddish or orange


Although normal room lights (tungsten lights) appear white to our eyes, their light is actually much "warmer" than daylight, giving a reddish or orange color to pictures. This happens with digital and film cameras. To prevent or lessen this reddish or orange color: If your digital camera has a selectable White Balance mode (check your camera's User's Guide) and you are not using the camera or external flash, set the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" light. If your pictures are reddish even when you use the camera flash or external flash, the room lighting is overpowering the flash. Try setting the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" and continue to use the flash. If your camera does not have a selectable White Balance mode, use the camera flash or external flash when taking pictures in lighting that makes your pictures turn out reddish or orange. If you can, turn down or turn off one of the room lights (without making the room too dark), or move your subject so that it is not being hit directly by the room lights. If you can, when taking pictures in the daytime, try opening any drapes that might be covering windows. Letting in natural daylight improves the color quality of the lighting.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare One Digital Camera

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