Question about Olympus Camedia D-380 Digital Camera

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F8 aperture

The D-380 specifications indicate that there is an F8 aperture available. How would I be able to shoot with the D-380 at F8?

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You are able to shoot at F8 by opening the lens barrier and sliding the macro switch to the Macro mode. This provides a mechanical aperture of F8. We recommend the use of this setting either when shooting close up images or when shooting images in a very brightly lit scene. Unfortunately, because the aperture is mechanical, the EXIF information is not recorded. Therefore, you can not see whether you photographed an image in the Macro mode or if the aperture has been changed. However, you can physically see the aperture close down by looking at the lens with a magnifying glass or loupe when turning the sliding the macro switch to the Macro mode.

Posted on Aug 31, 2005

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Can I shoot .380+P in my 1911-380 Black Label Medallion Pro Compact gun ???


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Tip

How does aperture setting affect a photograph?


The aperture is the opening in the lens through which light passes to the image sensor. Changing the aperture setting allows you to control the depth of field of a photograph. When the aperture is opened to a widersetting, (indicated by a lower f-stop number) more light is passed to the imagesensor, creating more shallow depth of field. Closing the aperture (indicatedby a higher f-stop number) allows less light to pass to the image sensor,creating wider depth of field.

NOTE: The aperture setting is one of three primary settings usedto control the overall exposure of a photograph. The other two primary settingsare ISO and shutter speed. Because the three settings work together to produce the overall exposure for a photograph, changingthe aperture setting will require complimentary changes to either the ISO or shutter speed to produce a properly exposed photograph. These changes will bemade automatically by the camera in the Auto, Program, Aperture-priority andShutter-priority modes.

There are two ways tocontrol the aperture setting on the camera:
  • Aperture-priority mode (A) - When shooting in Aperture priority mode (A), you set the aperture value and the camera automatically sets the optimum shutter speed for you.
  • Manual mode (M) - When shooting in Manual mode (M), you control both aperture and shutter speed, which gives you maximum creative control to achieve the exact results you want.

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1 Answer

Shoot pictures of the moon best setting for that


Hi. I would recommend first you use a tripod or some stable support, second the best settings would be Aperture priority and use something in the region of f56-f8 or Manual and set f5.6-f8 and use the exposure indicator to adjust the shutter speed, use the spot meter function on the camera if you have it and vary the exposure by shooting at the recommended exposure and also by shooting overexposed and underexposed. Trial and error is really the only way to go.Set the ISO to 100 or 200 to get the best resolution as you will probably have to zoom it up to 200% on your computer screen to have a good image.

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Why does my brand new Canon 6D freeze when shooting in RAW


The question in the title and the first sentence imply to me that you have confused manual mode and RAW format.

Title: "Why does my brand new Canon 6D freeze when shooting in RAWD freeze when shooting in RAW"

First sentence: "My brand new Canon 6D freezes when I try to shoot in manual."

Manual mode means you are responsible for all of the settings related to exposure (aperture, ISO, and shutterspeed). RAW is a specific file format to save the photo. They are independent of each other.

My guess is that in manual mode you have the shutterspeed set to the maximum of 30 seconds. The camera isn't going to automatically adjust it for you in manual mode. If you're new to DSLRs, start with Ae (Aperture priority) or Tv (Shutter priority). In Ae mode, you control the aperture and the camera will select the shutterspeed. In Tv mode, you select the shutterspeed and the camera selects the aperture for you. Start off with Auto ISO. This will help you learn what combinations of settings work well together.

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1 Answer

I did not get any instructions with my Opteka. Have tried to take photos with it. But they came out all blank. I used a tripod. Would like to know where I can down load instructions. Certainly not as good...


You did not provide enough information to determine what your problem is. For example, were the pictures all light or all dark. Knowing this lens, I will assume that they were all dark. So...

1) This is a very, very slow manual-focus lens. It will not auto focus. It must be manually focused very precisely because it has virtually no depth of field.
2) Depending on your camera, your internal light meter may not work. On my camera (Nikon D-90), it does. If it does not on yours and I suspect that may be your problem, you're going to have to shoot everything manually, i.e. setting the shutter speed and lens opening yourself. You can use your internal light meter to help you get started by taking your light reading before you install the lens...preferably using the aperture only setting where you set the aperture at f8 which I think is the speed of the Opteka and let the camera set the shutter speed. Make a note of the shutter speed then attach the Opteka to the camera and mount the lens on a tripod with the camera attached.
Then set your camera mode to manual and set the aperture to match the lens (f8, I think). Set the shutter speed at the speed you noted earlier. Shoot a picture using a remote shutter release or the self timer. This lens is so slow that unless you're in exceptionally bright conditions you will get fuzzy pictures due to camera movement at full zoom of 1200m and above if you're using the 2X doubler. I would start shooting at minimum zoom of 650 without the 2X doubler. Shoot a picture. and check the result.

You should have an image but it may be too light or too dark.

If its too light you'll need to increase the shutter speed or stop down the aperture to, say, f11...or both. Make the adjustment and shoot another picture. Remember that if you increase the aperture, you increase your depth of field, making focus less critical. If you increase the shutter speed you make camera or subject movement less critical.

If it's too dark, you can only increase the shutter speed because you can't open the lens any wider than f8. Make the adjustment and shoot the picture.

Keep doing this until the pictures are the way you want them.

This is a decent lens for the price and worth the little money they cost if you can't afford $10,000 plus for a high quality telephoto lens of this size. I would forget about the 2X doubler because as others have said, it further reduces the speed of an already very slow lens with such a high rate of magnification that a knat landing on the lens could cause the picture to blur from movement.

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1 Answer

I would just like to find out how to set aperture when shooting in manual mode


The REBEL is Either aperture or shutter priority.

You can set this up via the menu

There is a rule of thumb and it also depends on the ISO ( ASA or film speed) iF IN LOW LIGHT USE A HIGHER ISO say 200-1000

and an aperture set from ap ring on lens a good all round setting is F8

the rule for Apertures is smaller the number larger the aperture ( lets more light in, but in high iso settings you really dont need to change this unless its really dark,

Larger the number smaller the aperture used for very bright light conditions, where over exposure is likely to occur ( even in flash )

Flash automatically uses F8 but this is not always ideal as when shooting in some lights at a white object ( wedding) the pic will be overexposed , sometimes its better to use F11 with a flash and an ISO of 100. Perhaps you need to get an easy photo guide book Digital Photogreaphy for Dummies ( no insult intended) It has a lot of these little tips in it and will improve your pics beyond "Happy Snaps"

Changing the exposure is to use the aperture ring on the lense most are from F2-F22 depending on the focal length of the lens say 50 mm 150mm - 200mm for each size lens one would increase the F stop by 1 or add and EV point (+01) to compensate for the length.

Hope that is helpful for you

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1 Answer

Can not take a picture, setting are not correct


Digital cameras allow you to take pictures at different quality setting. The higher the setting the better the photo quality. Higher settings use more memory then lower settings. If you intend to make prints, always use a medium or high setting. The low setting should only be used when all you want to do is view the pictures on your computer or send them by email or over the Internet.

Recommended camera settings for portraits:
Focal length: 100 mm
Aperture: F2.8 (as large a f/stop as is available for proper exposure)
Exposure / Shooting Mode: Aperture Priority / Portrait
Flash: Fill-in, if face is in shadow

Recommended camera settings for landscapes:
Focal length: 38 mm
Aperture: F16 (as small a f/stop as is available for proper exposure)
Exposure / Shooting Mode: Aperture Priority / Landscape
Tripod: Yes, for long exposures

Digital Camera Tutorial - Better Photo Taking - Taking Digital ...Jus check this site for more details

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1 Answer

Aperture Priority Mode - an undocumented feature


In addition to the "quirks" of the Landscape and Aperture Priority Modes (neither mode works as documented!)..... The camera also behaves differently in full Manual Mode (it changes the settings, whether you want it to or not to compensate for available light)... At lower Zoom Levels, the camera will adjust the Shutter Speed Only, to try and compensate for available light... For example: with the Camera preset to F5.6 Aperture, and 1/48 sec. shutter speed, the camera will adjust the shutter speed between a range of 1/30 to 1/291 sec, to try and "auto expose" the shot for lower or higher light levels, even though you're in manual mode. At an Aperture Setting of 2.8 and 1/48 of a second, the number of internal steps in shutter speed the camera is willing to take, increases dramatially - for example: shutter speeds up to 1/600 of a second, even though you have the shutter set to 1/48 in manual mode. The camera WILL NOT attempt to adjust the Aperture to compensate for proper exposure in available light (OR WILL IT??).... It depends on your Zoom settings! It won't if your're near to full wide angle, but IT WILL if you are using the Zoom. Once you cross some unknown zoom threshold (it doesn't have to be at full zoom), then the camera begins to change both the Aperture and Shutter speed to compensate for available light, even though you are in "Full Manual", versus Auto Exposure Mode. In Manual Mode, (as in Aperture Priority Mode), the amount of change the camera is willing to make to your settings, appears to be related to a preset number of internal steps, with the number of steps dependent on both Aperture and Zoom Settings, before it gives an EV Warning for Over or Under Exposure conditions.... The type (shutter speed only for wide angle, shutter and aperture for zoom) and amount (number of internal "steps" it takes to increase/decrease shutter speed and increase or decrease aperture), is dependent on the amount of zoom you are using for the current shot.

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1 Answer

F8 aperture


You are able to shoot at F8 by opening the lens barrier and sliding the macro switch to the Macro mode. This provides a mechanical aperture of F8. We recommend the use of this setting either when shooting close up images or when shooting images in a very brightly lit scene. Unfortunately, because the aperture is mechanical, the EXIF information is not recorded. Therefore, you can not see whether you photographed an image in the Macro mode or if the aperture has been changed. However, you can physically see the aperture close down by looking at the lens with a magnifying glass or loupe when turning the sliding the macro switch to the Macro mode.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-370 Digital Camera

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