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Should the custom white balance feature be used with or without a flash?

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Re: Should the custom white balance feature be used with...

You can use customer white balance with or without a flash. If you use a flash to do a custom WB, you must adjust the F-stop and make it narrower. If you do not do so, the custom WB will over expose every time when using a white card. White balance is used to measure the Kelvin temperature that the light source is outputting so that the camera can set itself to that specific reading.

Posted on Aug 29, 2005

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Sony a550 white balance


Do you try to set the white balance, wheel the camera is still in an automatic mode or in a scene mode?, because that won't work. If you keep having problems while in a manual mode, let us know, so I can look again to this problem.

Mar 19, 2014 | Sony DSLR-A550 Digital Camera

2 Answers

How do you find the white balance on this camera?


This camera does not have a customizable white balance. It does have some presets -- they are:

  • Auto (default)-automatically corrects white
balance. Ideal for general picture taking.

  • Daylight-for pictures in natural lighting.
  • Tungsten-corrects the orange cast of household
light bulbs. Ideal for indoor pictures under tungsten or
halogen lighting without flash.

  • Fluorescent-corrects the green cast of fluorescent
lighting. Ideal for indoor pictures under fluorescent
lighting without flash.

To access them, press the [Menu] button and look for White Balance -- the icon is a Sun and Light Bulb symbol.

Oct 28, 2013 | Kodak EasyShare Z760 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I need a manual for vivtiar 3188


Product MPN MPN: 80640 Key Features Features: Red-eye Correction Camera Type: Compact Resolution: 3.1 Megapixel LCD Screen Size: 1.5 in. Optical Zoom: Without Optical Zoom Digital Zoom: 4x Lens Interchangeable Lens: Not Interchangeable Lenses Optical Zoom: Without Optical Zoom Focus Type: Autofocus Macro Focus Range: 7.87 - 11.81 in. (w) Focal Length: 6.1 - 18.3 mm Image Quality Image Sensor Type: CMOS Camera Resolution: 3.1 Megapixel Image Resolutions: 2560 x 1920 · 2048 x 1536 · 1600 x 1200 Video Video Resolutions: 640 x 480 (VGA) Video Speed: 15 fps Video Format: AVI Exposure Control Aperture Range: f2.8/f4.8 (w/t) White Balance: Auto · Daylight / Sunny (Preset) · Cloudy (Preset) · Fluorescent (Preset) · Tungsten (Preset) Storage Memory Type: Built-in · SD Card Built-in Memory Size: 16 MB Compression Type: JPEG Flash Flash Type: Built-In Flash Functions: Flash Off · Auto Flash · Forced On Viewfinder / Display LCD Protected Position: Without LCD Protected Position Interfaces Interface Type: USB 1.1 Video Interface: Video Out Power Supply Battery Type: 2 x AAA Batteries Included Features Built-in Microphone: With Built-in Microphone System Requirements Operating System: Microsoft Windows 2000 · Microsoft Windows 98SE · Microsoft Windows ME · Microsoft Windows XP Dimensions Width: 3.5 in. Depth: 0.8 in. Height: 2.44 in. Miscellaneous Family Line: Vivitar ViviCam UPC: 19643806405 Product ID: 44609540 Return to top

Aug 30, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Best setting for indoor


There are three possible solutions for you:

1. Just use the Daylight (direct sun) white balance setting. Electronic flash is typically close to the direct sunlight setting for white balance. Advantages: it is simple. Disadvantages: if you are balancing electronic flash with ambient light, you are likely to have an odd mixture of lighting, with the ambient lighting tending toward red (if incandescent) or green (if flourescent).

2. Get a Wratten 85 color correction gel that you can cover your flash's head with, and use the Tungsten white balance setting. This will bring your flash output into line with existing incandescent light sources. Advantages: almost as simple as (1), and allows you to come close to matching a common indoor lighting situation. This will produce more natural-looking environmental shots if you balance the flash and incandescent ambient light contributions to the exposure. Disadvantages: large gel filters get expensive. You may be able to obtain something close to the Wratten 85 color correction filter from a theater supply house more cheaply. Roscolux #3408 is slightly weaker and #3411 is slightly stronger than the Wratten 85. If you have to balance flash with flourescent light sources, try a Roscolux in the cyan series leading to #4360. Some experimentation is likely to be required. The place I looked online offered the Roscolux in 20x24" sheets for about $7 per sheet, a bargain compared to the optical-grade Wratten filters.

3. Set a custom white balance. This is not too difficult, and it will definitely provide the best approximation to your desired white balance that you will obtain in the field. Advantages: this will allow you to reproduce white accurately even with mixed lighting sources. Combine with gel over flash of (2) for the very best approach to balanced flash/incandescent lighting situations. Disadvantages: requires a "white" target (can be a neutral gray photo card, for example) and some additional time before a photo session.

You can obtain some striking effects by purposely mixing color temperature light sources. But day in and day out, getting a balanced shot is a skill that it pays to cultivate.

Feb 03, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S2 Pro Digital Camera

1 Answer

Photos coming out with too much yellow


You're shooting under incandescent light, and the camera doesn't manage to set the white balance entirely automatically. You can try to explicitly set the white balance to incandescent, or you may be able to create a custom white balance (I'm not sure whether Nikon bodies offer that feature), or you can adjust the white balance during processing (in which case it's better to shoot raw).

Sep 14, 2005 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Photos coming out with too much yellow


You're shooting under incandescent light, and the camera doesn't manage to set the white balance entirely automatically. You can try to explicitly set the white balance to incandescent, or you may be able to create a custom white balance (I'm not sure whether Nikon bodies offer that feature), or you can adjust the white balance during processing (in which case it's better to shoot raw).

Sep 14, 2005 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera with 19-35mm Lens

2 Answers

Photos coming out with too much yellow


You're shooting under incandescent light, and the camera doesn't manage to set the white balance entirely automatically. You can try to explicitly set the white balance to incandescent, or you may be able to create a custom white balance (I'm not sure whether Nikon bodies offer that feature), or you can adjust the white balance during processing (in which case it's better to shoot raw).

Sep 14, 2005 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera with 18-70mm Lens

1 Answer

Photos coming out with too much yellow


You're shooting under incandescent light, and the camera doesn't manage to set the white balance entirely automatically. You can try to explicitly set the white balance to incandescent, or you may be able to create a custom white balance (I'm not sure whether Nikon bodies offer that feature), or you can adjust the white balance during processing (in which case it's better to shoot raw).

Sep 14, 2005 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera with 18-50mm Lens

1 Answer

White balance metering


Cameras need a white reference for that measurement, they don't get it from the meter. On your camera (which I think works pretty much like my 10D) you can take a picture of a white card (white reference); the camera would use that frame to set its WB in AUTO mode (AWB). You can also safely guesstimate the K value with a little practice for cases in which a white card is not available or no other white objects are at hand. White Balance measures the light K value which illuminates a scene it doesn't measure the objects in an image. Further, in some cases you may have mixed lighting which makes matters slightly more complex. For example: if you are shooting under tungsten ambient light and want to use flash as a main or fill light you'll have to use a gel on the flash to match the ambient light and set the camera to that K value. This will give uniform light cast (color). However, for creative purposes, it's desirable occasionally to let one of the two light sources "shift". In the example just given, if you set the camera to a K value of 5600-5800 (around a typical flash K value) and use the flash without gels then, the tungsten ambient light would appear as shifted (redish, the typical tungsten colorcast when used with daylight film/wb) while the flash light would be balanced and not shifted. This difference (shift) would give the picture a different feeling.

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon PowerShot EOS D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures reddish or orange


Although normal room lights (tungsten lights) appear white to our eyes, their light is actually much "warmer" than daylight, giving a reddish or orange color to pictures. This happens with digital and film cameras. To prevent or lessen this reddish or orange color: If your digital camera has a selectable White Balance mode (check your camera's User's Guide) and you are not using the camera or external flash, set the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" light. If your pictures are reddish even when you use the camera flash or external flash, the room lighting is overpowering the flash. Try setting the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" and continue to use the flash. If your camera does not have a selectable White Balance mode, use the camera flash or external flash when taking pictures in lighting that makes your pictures turn out reddish or orange. If you can, turn down or turn off one of the room lights (without making the room too dark), or move your subject so that it is not being hit directly by the room lights. If you can, when taking pictures in the daytime, try opening any drapes that might be covering windows. Letting in natural daylight improves the color quality of the lighting.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare One Digital Camera

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