Question about Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why do two pictures of the same scene, taken at about the same time have different exposures?

Posted by Anonymous on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 114 Answers
Re: Why do two pictures of the same scene, taken at about...

Your camera light meter uses the concept of multi-spot exposure metering, which is sensitive to subtle differences in scene composition. To determine the overall shutter speed for a scene, the meter takes readings from three zones within the frame. With Portrait orientations, the zones remain in the same place (vertical) on the CCD imager. With landscape orientations, however, the zones are more spread out (horizontal) and the dominant (2 dark and 1 light or 2 light and 1 dark) zones determine the shutter speed. This may cause some areas of the picture to be overexposed or underexposed.

Posted on Aug 29, 2005

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...
3 Points

Related Questions:

2 Answers

How to shoot dhr with sony dsc-w570?


I don't know your specific camera, but the answer is pretty universal. HDR is High Dynamic Range. Few cameras can do it themselves. You will need a tripod. Take a series of pictures at different exposures, 1 stop apart. You can do that with the exposure adjust +- control. Take one shot each at normal, +1, +2, -1, and -2. Then you will need HDR software to assemble the pictures. There are many programs, some free, some not.

Dec 29, 2011 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W570 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What should exposure compensation be set on


That depends on what you're taking a picture of. Normally, you'd want it on zero.

Use it if the exposure meter produces an exposure too light or too dark for the subject. The camera's meter is designed to render all scenes as a medium gray. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to render the scene as a medium gray. In this situation you want to use positive exposure compensation to render the scene brighter.

Conversely, if take a picture of a black cat sunning itself on a black car, the camera will again try to render the scene as a medium gray. In this case you want negative exposure compensation to darken the scene.

Jul 09, 2011 | Kodak EasyShare C143 Digital Camera

1 Answer

CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN TO TO ME WHAT IS EV COMPENSATION AND HOW DOES IT WORK


EV compensation is "Exposure Value compensation". The camera contains an exposure meter which determines how much light is on the scene and sets the exposure appropriately. However, this meter does not know WHAT you're taking a picture of, nor does it know what effect you're going for. The best it can do is to assume you're taking a picture of an "average" scene and want it to be of "average" brightness. It does this by assuming the scene is "middle gray," halfway between black and white. Most of the time this works fine, because most scenes are, well, average.
However, this is not always the case. Suppose you're taking a picture of a white dog playing in the snow. Almost everything in the scene is bright white, but the camera doesn't know that. It tries to make the scene middle gray, and the result is that you get a gray dog playing in gray snow.
On the other hand, suppose you're taking a picture of a black cat sleeping on the hood of a black car. Here everything is black, but the camera doesn't know it. It tries to make an average scene, resulting in a gray cat sleeping on a gray car.
EV compensation allows you to override the camera's exposure setting. In the first example, you'd want to add two or three stops (positive EV compensation) to force the camera to render the dog and snow as white instead of gray. In the second example, you'd want to subtract a stop or two (negative EV compensation) to render the cat black instead of gray.
How much EV compensation is correct? Well, that depends on the scene. With a digital camera, you can look at the picture and see whether the dog looks white or the cat looks black. Film photographers take lots of shot, using various levels of EV compensation, so that one of them would come out right.

Mar 19, 2011 | DXG Technology DXG-505V Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hello, I would like my pictures to have a white background. When I take the picture on a white background the background ends up looking gray. I am taking pictures of baby clothing and I want the clothing...


Exposure meters are designed on the premise that the scene is an average, middle gray, in brightness. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray dog playing in gray snow). If you take a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray cat sitting on gray ground).

If the white background is dominating the scene, the camera will reduce exposure to try to make the entire scene come out middle gray. The solution is to meter on something else. Move in close and fill the frame with the subject, press the AE-LOCK button, then move back, compose the picture, and take the shot. For full details, refer to the "Shooting with the exposure locked --- AE-LOCK" section in the manual (page 52 in my copy).

If you're taking a lot of pictures, you might want to switch to Manual mode and set the exposure accordingly.

Dec 29, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F717 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Does camera have timer


Putting Yourself in the Picture The Self Timer creates a 10-second delay between the time you press the Shutter button and the time the picture is taken. 1 Place the camera on a flat surface or use a tripod. 2 In any Still mode, press the Self Timer button. The Self Timer icon appears in the status area. 3 Compose the scene. Then press the Shutter button half-way and hold to set the exposure and focus, then press the rest of the way down. Move so that you are in the scene. The Self Timer light blinks slowly for 8 seconds (then quickly for 2 seconds) before the picture is taken. The camera "clicks" when the picture is captured. To turn off the shutter sound, see page 64. The Self Timer turns off after you take the picture or if you change modes. To cancel the Self Timer before the picture is taken, press the Self Timer button. (The Self Timer setting remains active.) To turn off the Self Timer, press the Self Timer button twice.

Jan 09, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare DX6340 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Developed Pictures


I didn't think double exposures were possible with digital cameras! You learn something new every day! BUT--to find out if it is the camera or some doofus who is sloppy making prints for you, download a whole bunch to your (or anyone's) computer, and see if there are any double exposures. I think whoever developed your pictures must have had one hell of a hangover. COMPLAIN. I bet they will send you redone and complete new copies.

Feb 04, 2007 | Fuji FinePix E550 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure control options


The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are four scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Exposure control options


The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are five scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: - Landscape + Portrait: Suitable for taking photos of both you subject and background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. - Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. - Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. - Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. - Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5060 Wide Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera Logo

Related Topics:

61 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Kodak Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

92757 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2598 Answers

Are you a Kodak Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...