Question about Acer Aspire L100 PC Desktop

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On my way to Radio Shack

Yes they are all the same manf. 1000uF 6.3 volts. I also looked at another ATX motherboard that was on it's way to recycling and it has a bulged 1000uF capacitor (different manf.). I think I'll buy a gross of these things.

I'll let you know the results.

-clw

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Excellent, would be good to hear if you get yours working

Regards

Nick

Posted on Aug 21, 2008

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2 Answers

Where do the p3,4,5and 6 go in the computer


If you go to the Dell support site you can download the manual.

Apr 09, 2013 | Dell OptiPlex GX520 PC Desktop

2 Answers

Scaleo T stops dead and shorts out house supply when plugged in.


check the board visually if you have some bulged capacitors near cpu or north bridge but in most cases also near sata controller.
if you have then replace the capacitors usually tyhey are designed for 6,3V 1000uF or same spec for 16V
all caps are 105C.
also you need to replace them in the power supply.
now days the factory giving low strenght psu to high spec computer.
get some corsair power supply between 800-1000W
i know that is to much but then you can do upgrade later on such as graphic or cpu or more ram.
finally test the voltages on mos fet transistors.
usually people asking why this happen
it happens because the main is not filtered and usually no many home user have upc backup with power filter and the seccond thing is
the fact when the board request more power from the psu then the psu drain more down and when the oscillator on the primary circuit start to catch up then the capacitors blow up by the time.
sometime the 5V goes up to 12-or 16
in this case most component suffer like sata controller or north bridge.

Mar 21, 2013 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have an Hp m260n. I just need to find out what type of case it has (ATX or uATX).


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00026876

Motherboard: ASUS P4SD Motherboard Specifications

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00022505&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en#c00022505_doc

Board Form Factor: uATX

uATX stands for Micro-ATX,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroATX

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor#Tabular_information

HOWEVER, the Power Supply is an ATX form factor,

http://www.911forpcs.com/hp-media-center-power-supply.html

,of a sort.

Form Factor related directly to desktop computer Motherboards.
Now has 'evolved' to relate to the computer case, and Power Supply.

When referring to a Power Supply, and the ATX form factor; you are not only referring to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case; but also the type of power cables used, and the technology used within.

Size and shape of an ATX power supply is approximately;

6 Inches Wide, 5.5 Inches Long, and 3.5 Inches in Height.
(152.39mm Wide, 139.69mm Long, and 88.89mm in Height)

Power cables included with Power Supply's nowadays, will include all the power cables you'll need, with probably some left over.

HOWEVER, looking at the 'ATX' form factor designated for your computer, to wit from the ad above, it does NOT fit the above size, and shape.

More like 6 Inches Wide, 4 Inches Long, and 3.5 Inches in Height.
Looks like they just crammed everything into one small box.

Remove motherboard, and all internal hardware, into a new computer case?
No prob!

Most Mid-Tower to Full Tower size computer cases, will have a Support Plate that accommodates a Micro-ATX form factor motherboard, OR an ATX form factor motherboard.

Just look at the Support Plate mounting holes.
Ones for a Micro-ATX (uATX) motherboard, will have uATX next to them, or MATX, or mATX.

Ones for an ATX motherboard, will have ATX next to them.

However check the computer case manufacturer info to be sure.

[ The motherboard mounts to a Support Plate.
The Support Plate can be an integral part of the metal frame, of the computer case; or a separate metal plate that attaches to the computer case metal frame ]

Not what you had in mind Joel? Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 17, 2013 | HP Media Center PC M260n (DF200A#ABA) PC...

1 Answer

T5274 power supply spec


That's easy Lou

Why?

Primer first before I give a recommendation. I ABHOR just posting,
"Oh, use this one".
I like to teach, so that you can use deductive reasoning based on intelligent thought.

Primer;
Because for one eMachines are a budget computer. As such they use low quality budget Power Supply's.

Probably a generic Bestec, Hi-Pro, or Delta, power supply.
250 to 300 Watt.

12 Volt power rail is probably 12 to 14 Amps.
Nothing to write home to Mom about. Just an internet, or office program computer, with compatible power supply.

The size, and shape of the power supply's case is an ATX.
Approximately 6 Inches Wide, by 5-1/2 inches Long (5.5), by 3-1/2 Inches Tall. (3.5 / Height)

ATX also refers to that is has a Soft Power On feature, plus refers to the power cables it uses.

The eMachines T5272 Desktop PC, came with an ECS 945GCT-M3 motherboard, according to my records,

http://www.ecs.com.tw/ECSWebSite/Product/Product_Detail.aspx?CategoryID=1&DetailID=719&DetailName=Feature&MenuID=1&LanID=0

To the right of the blurred motherboard photo, click on - More pictures.

1) Requires a 24-pin ATX main power cable.
Long blue connector on the right side of the motherboard, is for the IDE harddrive.
Above it the black long connector is for a Floppy Drive. To the left of the Floppy Drive connector, is the motherboard's 24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

Average example of a 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[Note* Color does NOT matter for any power cable connector, or it's matching connector on the motherboard ]

2) Requires a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
To the left side of the Processor socket are 6 polymer solid capacitors. To the left of them are three choke coils. Right below the last choke coil, is the motherboard 4-pin ATX +12 volt power cable connector.
An average example of a 4-pin +12 Volt power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This is power for the Processor.

3) Since there are four black SATA headers on the motherboard, I imagine you will be using a SATA harddrive. (Can also use a SATA optical drive too. {CD/DVD drive)

You will need a SATA power cable for each SATA device.
Average example of a SATA power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

[ Note*
IF, your SATA harddrive has a provision for a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable!!

Otherwise you will burn out the SATA harddrive! May not happen immediately, but I ASSURE you it will happen down the road.

Average example of a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,
(Erroneously referred to as a 'Molex' power cable. Name stuck, just like calling an adjustable open-end wrench, a Crescent wrench ),

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

[Also, it is a Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable. The one used for a Floppy Drive, is a Small Peripheral power cable. Now used for power to a Card Reader ]

D) Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable/s. May need for computer case fan/s, besides the one on the motherboard, or power to an IDE optical drive, or IDE harddrive.

Primer over.

Recommendation, and why;

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=4362114&CatId=1483

[NOT advertising for said website. You may find a better price from another reliable dealer. Do a search ]

1) 140Millimeter Fan.
A larger fan runs slower than a smaller fan, (80mm), and puts out more air. This makes it quieter, and has more efficient cooling.

UNLESS, of course you are gaming! Will put out more noise. But, let's be real here. If you're gaming, with the sound up, are you going to hear the fan? Lol!

2) It's SLI ready. Which means it's also CrossFire ready. Can run two graphics cards.

You can use the 6-pin PCI Express power cable for one graphics card, and use the 6-pin PCI Express power cable, from the 6-pin/8-pin PCI Express power cable, for the other graphics card.

3) There are TWO 12 Volt power rails. Yes, still actually comes from one main 12 volt power rail, but divided amperage between the two.

25 Amp's for EACH 12 volt power rail.
Yes, you can total that up to 50 Amps for 12 Volt power.

4) Has all the power cables you'll need now, and possibly for the future.

5) Is reliable. Has an 80 percent efficiency rating, but at a 480 Watt power load it is 83.5 to 86.6 percent efficient.
81.9 percent efficient at 600 Watts,

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/936

[Suggest read the entire article. This website is VERY proficient at testing power supply's. Does NOT care what the manufacturer thinks. They tell the Truth. They also are the only website to my knowledge, that has an EXPENSIVE power supply tester. Tests the LOAD, for one thing. They also 'dissect' the power supply, and look at all components inside ]

6) The price.
Do not have to 'Break the bank', to get more bang for your buck.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jun 15, 2012 | eMachines T5274 Desktop PC

1 Answer

SMPS CONNECTION DIAGRAM


Not a problem, but it would be handier to have the manufacturer Name, and Model Number.

(Back of computer on a sticker, next to the Windows product key, or up on the side of the computer tower )


SMPS = Switched-Mode Power Supply. The style used in personal computers now,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

A) Main power cable:
There are three styles;

1) The old AT style that has two separate connectors. The connectors BOTH connectors have BLACK wires towards one side.

The connectors also have ONLY one way, (Direction), they can be plugged onto the motherboard.
This is due to the Lock, and Locating Tab on the motherboard connector/s, and the main power cables connector/s.

When you can plug the connectors on the motherboard, with both connector's BLACK wires facing each other, (They will be in the middle), you have them installed correctly,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#oldpc

2) The newer ATX style. Uses one power cable, and connector.
First style to come out was the 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, has a LOCK on one side.
This Lock locks over a Locating Tab, on the female motherboard connector.

To remove this power cable you squeeze in on the Top of the Lock.
The Lock operates like a see-saw on a playground. When you squeeze the top in, you remove it's hooked end away, from the Locating Tab of the motherboard connector.

To be ensured that this cable is plugged in tightly, and correctly, the Lock's hooked end will be over the Locating Tab, on the motherboard connector.

3) The newest style is the 24-pin ATX main power cable.
As computer hardware evolved, and became better, it demanded more power.
The extra 4 pins of the 24-pin ATX main power cable provided this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[ Aftermarket power supply manufacturers, provide power supply's with a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable, usually.
You can use it as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or use the additional 4 pin cable, and use it as a 24-pin ATX main power cable ]

4) Motherboard didn't provide enough power for newer Processors.
The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was brought out.
(Has Lock with Locating Tab on the motherboard connector, also)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

5) Motherboard didn't provide enough power for high-end graphics card.
4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable didn't help.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

Plugs into a graphics card.

[ Note*
In all power cables, Red wires are 5 Volts. Yellow wires are 12 Volts. ALL Black wires are Ground wires ]

Next in line was two versions of the 8-pin power cable.

A) 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
Originally brought out for server computers, that has multiple Processors.
Plugs into the motherboard.

B) 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
Brought out for more power, than a 6-pin PCI Express power cable could put out.
Plugs into a graphics card.

(6-pin PCI Express power cable is capable of handling 75 Watts.
8-pin PCI Express power cable will handle 150 Watts )

If you have an IDE (PATA) harddrive, a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable is what you need. ('Molex' is the slang term for it's connector)

If you have a SATA harddrive you need a 15-pin SATA power cable.

NOTE*
IF, your SATA harddrive has a provision for a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, AND a SATA power cable;

ONLY USE the SATA power cable!

If you use both you will burn out the harddrive. Maybe not immediately, but I assure you down the road you will.
(Do not use just a single 4-pin standard peripheral power cable, either)

Optical drive/s use a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, if they are IDE (PATA) units.
If they are SATA units they use a SATA power cable.

The old Floppy Drives use a 4-pin small Peripheral power cable.
Same cable plugs into a Card Reader, also.

The plastic front of your computer is the Front Panel.

The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the cables, (Wires), from the Front Panel go to, is the Front Panel header.

Sometimes abbreviated on the motherboard as;
F_PANEL 1, or FP1, etc.

I will need to know the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number, (HP = Product Number, or P/N), or the manufacturer name, and Model Number of the motherboard, to TRY to provide this information.

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 12, 2012 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

My computer will not turn on and i was told something is wrong with the motherboard. How do i fix this?


Your computer, Dell Dimension E521 Desktop PC, will not turn on, and someone told you the problem is the motherboard?

Unless you stated to this entity, that you spotted leaking Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard, how can they assume this?

I believe you should check whether the problem is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply.

1) The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button. It is an ATX power on switch. (The Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch )

This is an example of an ATX power on switch, that I have found fits many desktop computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

The test to perform bypasses the Power On switch. It does NOT involve the Power On switch itself, however.

Bypassing the Power On switch turns the computer (Power Supply) on?
Problem is the Power On switch.

Bypassing the Power On switch does NOT turn the computer (Power Supply) on?
The problem is the Power Supply.

A) Computer on a table, computer unplugged from power, computer case open.
I would then lay the computer on it's side, on a towel, on the table, computer case opening UP.
Watch the cables attached to the computer.

This is so you can access the components inside of the computer more easily. This will become apparent in a moment.
Now follow Anti-Static Precautions.

Anti-Static Precautions:
Your body carries Static electricity. Static WILL fry out (Short Circuit) the delicate hardware components inside a computer.
Relieve your body of Static BEFORE reaching inside the computer.

(Have to restate) Computer on a table, computer unplugged from power, computer case open.
TOUCH an unpainted surface, of the metal frame of the open computer case.
This action will relieve your body of Static.

Should you leave your computer in the middle of working on it, (For ANY reason), be SURE to touch the metal frame again upon your return.

Now you are safe, and the computer is safe. Let's begin;

Inside your computer there is a power cable coming from the Power Supply, that plugs into the motherboard. This power cable I'm referring to is the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

This is an example of a 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Female connector on motherboard shown in the Left photo.
Power cable connector shown in the middle photo.

The photo to the right shows the ATX main power cable plugged into the motherboard.
This is how it needs to be for the test. It also shows the color of the various wires going into it.
We only need to be concerned with Two wires.

The Green wire, and ANY Black wire.

The Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. It is also abbreviated as PS_ON.
ANY Black wire you see is a Ground wire.

A jumper wire is used to BRIEFLY connect the Green wire, to ANY Black wire.
(Again, the Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch)

The jumper wire preferred to use is a paper clip. The paper clip is straightened out, then bent into a U-shape.
Look at the U-shape upside down. The top/middle is wrapped a few times with black plastic electrical tape. This is for your fingers, and thumb to hold onto.

The 'legs' of the U-shape go down into the Back of the ATX main power cable's connector.
(I shortened 24-pin ATX main power cable to ATX main power cable)

Look at the photo to the right. See how the Green wire goes down into a squarish socket hole?
Look at the photo in the middle. See the metal tube shapes at the Front of the connector?
Brass looking, slightly square?

These are metal terminals. There is a metal terminal for every wire, going down into the ATX main power cable connector.

The 'leg' of the U-shape jumper wire goes down into the Back of the connector (ATX main power cable connector), RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wire that is in the socket hole.

It has to go down into the squarish socket hole far enough, to pass by the insulation of the wire, and Touch the metal terminal.

Example:
One leg of the U-shape goes down into the socket hole of the Green wire, right next to the Green wire, and touches the metal terminal.

The other leg of the U-shape goes down into a socket hole, with ANY Black wire, and touches the metal terminal pin.

The leg MUST touch the metal terminal pin.

The contact made is brief. No more than 2 seconds. (1001,..1002)

Shock warning. None.
The Soft Power On wire (Green wire) has 5 Volts DC going through it.
In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.

HOWEVER, there may be a spark, as both legs of the U-shape jumper wire touch their respective metal terminals. Warning you in advance.

You are also holding onto the black plastic electrical tape. (One wrap of black plastic electrical tape will insulate you from 600 Volts DC)

IF, the jumper wire turns the computer on, (Power Supply actually), the problem is a bad Power On switch.

IF, the jumper wire does Not turn the computer on, the problem is a bad Power Supply.

The Power Supply used in a Dell Dimension E521 Desktop PC, is an ATX (Form Factor) power supply.

The form factor ATX for a Power Supply refers to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case, and the power cables provided with the Power Supply.

The size, and shape of the ATX power supply case is approximately 6 inches Wide (Width), 5-1/2 inches Long (Length), and 3-1/2 inches Tall. (Height)

With the power cables offered with today's offering of ATX power supply's, there is no need to be concerned if the ATX power supply in question, has the needed power cables.

ATX power supply's sold now, have the correct power cables you'll need, and the correct amount of power cables.

This is just one example of an ATX power supply that will work,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1389575&CatId=1078

Scroll down to the bold heading - Detailed Features
Look at the chart under the subheading - Connectors

Note the first connector shown. This is a 20-pin plus a 4-pin main power cable.
Both power cables are used for your 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on your motherboard.

This gives a little more information on a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

Note the photo to the right. This particular motherboard has a 20-pin ATX main power cable connector. It does not require the additional 4-pin power cable.
Yours does.

Do Not confuse the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, with the 4-pin power cable that comes with a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

The 4-pin power cable you need is in the harness of wires, for the 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

There WILL be a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, however. This is an example of a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

(Color of the connectors for any power cable, does Not matter. They can be any color)

Dell Support > Dimension E521 Desktop PC > Service Manual,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dime521/en/SM_EN/index.htm

In the list click on - Technical Overview
Now click on - System Board Components

22 is where the 24-pin ATX main power cable plugs in.

(NOTE*
The 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, and the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable connector, have a Lock on the side. The plastic rectangle on the side of the connector/s.
This Lock has a hook on the bottom end. The end that faces the motherboard.
The hook goes over a Tab on the female connector, on the motherboard.

The Lock acts like a see-saw on a playground. The top of the Lock is squeezed in. This action brings the hooked end away, from the Tab on the motherboard female connector.
Then the power cable CONNECTOR is wiggled, and removed from the female motherboard connector.

{ ONLY use the Connector when removing it. DO NOT pull on the wires)

2 points to where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in.
That's it for the Power Supply power cables.

1 points to where the Processor Fan plugs into.
5 and 6, point to where the Data cables from the SATA harddrive, and SATA optical drives, plug into.
(This is if the Dimension E521 has SATA optical drives, and not IDE { PATA} optical drives)

[ The SATA data cable connector has 7 contact pins in it. It is the shorter connector.
The SATA power cable has 15 pins in it. It is the longer connector.

IF, the SATA harddrive has a provision for using a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin Peripheral power cable (Mislabeled as Molex), ONLY use just the SATA power cable. Otherwise the SATA harddrive will burn out. Sometimes not right away, but eventually it does ]

Going back to the main page for the Service Manual, click on -
Removing and Installing Parts.

Removing the Computer Cover is listed, as well as Power Supply.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 03, 2011 | Dell Dimension E521 PC Desktop

1 Answer

I am looking at a Dell Dimension 4550 PC for a friend and it won't boot up...i push the power button on and there is an almost orange/greenish light on the power button... no beeps no diagnostic lights are...


Bad Power Supply. Weak voltage power rail.

[There are three main voltages produced by the Dimension 4550's Power Supply.
1) 3.3 Volts
2) 5 Volts
3) 12 Volts ]

The Power On button LED functions as a diagnostic light also.

Dell Support > Dimension 4550 > Service Manual,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4550/

Left-click on Solving Problems, then click on Power Problems

The Power Supply is just an ATX form factor version. The common Power Supply form factor used in MANY desktop computers.
(ATX form factor for a Power Supply refers to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case.
Approximately 6 inches Wide, 5.5 inches Long, and 3-1/2 inches Tall)

HOWEVER, (Not shouting), there is an area of concern, should you try a Power Supply you may have available for a test, or purchase one.

It involves the wiring of the 20-pin ATX main power cable. More specifically the power cable's connector.

To explain view the standard wiring, set for a 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Looking at the photo to the far right, observe the color code of the wires, going down into the socket holes of the connector.

Look at the Lock tab on the side of the connector. This will help you orient the color code of the wires, and their placement in the socket holes, to the chart below the photos.

The connector on the end of the 20-pin ATX main power cable, is a Male connector.
Where the wires go into the connector, is the Back of the connector.
In the middle photo you can see the Front of the connector.

The wires going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, end in a female metal terminal.
The connector on the motherboard, (Shown in the photo to the Left), has Pins.
The metal female terminals go over the Pins.

The pins are numbered. The color code of the wires match up to the pins.
This is shown in the chart.

Now look at Dell Support > Dimension 4550 > Technical Overview > DC Power Connectors >
DC Power Connector P1

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4550/techov.htm#1101897

The illustration may not be accurate. You'll have to compare since you have the computer, and Power Supply in front of you.

For a time period Dell was a Proprietary manufacturer.
Meaning they wanted THEIR parts used on THEIR computers, and ONLY THEIR parts.
They had the motherboard manufacturers make motherboards according to their specs.

One of the specifications was that the pins would be CHANGED around, in the motherboard connector for the ATX main power cable.

They also had Power Supply manufacturers make the ATX power cable to their specifications.

This means if a user bought an aftermarket Power Supply, the color code of the wires in the ATX main power cable would Not match.

Many users did buy an aftermarket Power Supply, and installed it.
Burnt motherboards, fried Processors, and graphics cards, resulted.

Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
Black wires are Ground wires.

Guess what happens when you plug a 12 Volt wire into where a 3.3 Volt, or 5 Volt, or Ground wire is supposed to Be?
POOF!

My suggestion would be to look for a Power Supply that is an ATX form factor, is KNOWN to be good, and is compatible, for a test unit.
You, or someone you know may have upgraded to a better computer, and you may be able to borrow the Power Supply for a test unit.

Compatible:
Has the Correct power cables.
1) 20-pin ATX main power cable, OR a 20/24-pin ATX main power cable.
(20-pin connector that has an additional connector with 4 pins. Just use the 20-pin)

2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. (Also referred to as P4 MB, and P4 ATX 12V)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

(Power for the Processor)

3) Enough standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables.
(Misnomered as Molex)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

(Power for the IDE Harddrive, and Optical drive/s)

Also:
You can change the power wires around in the ATX main power cable's connector.
Change them around, in an aftermarket Power Supply's ATX main power cable's connector.

Want to know how post in a Comment.

Oct 09, 2010 | Dell Dimension 4550 PC Desktop

1 Answer

My computer just stoped working. It wont power on and when I hold the power button there is just a blue flashing light


Bad Power Supply.
Weak Voltage power rail.

The Pavilion a6000n desktop computer uses an ATX style of power supply, and is rated at 300 Watts.
(Probably made by Delta Electronics)

The ATX style of Power Supply is used in over 85 percent of PC's. Very common unit.

[Case size is approximately 6 inches Long, 6 inches Wide, and 3-1/2 inches Tall ]

What you are looking for is an ATX power supply with at Least 300 Watts, and the correct power cables.

Note that a computer only uses the power it needs, and No more.

Wouldn't matter if you had a 10,000 Watt Power Supply, (Exaggeration), and the computer only needed 100 Watts, it will only use 100 Watts.

(Surfing the internet typically uses 100 Watts.
Computer. Monitor uses it's own power, and is separate from this figure)

This is HP Support > Pavilion a6000n desktop computer > Specifications,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00873231&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3377269&lang=en

This is HP Support > Pavilion a6000 desktop computer > Motherboard Specifications,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00906129&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3377269&lang=en

1) Scrolling down the page, and looking at the photo of the motherboard, you can tell the Power Supply must have a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

To the right of the Blue, and Black ram memory slots is the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on the motherboard.

It is White in color, and consists of 2 rows of 12 socket holes.
24 total.

On the illustration it is marked as - ATXPOWER.

This is a closer look at a typical 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Note the Lock on the side of the connector. The Lock is hinged in the middle, (Plastic), and operates like a see-saw on a playground.

Squeeze the top of the Lock in to remove the 24-pin ATX main power cable.
ONLY gently pull up on the connector, and NOT the wires.

[This action brings the hooked end of the Lock away from a 'Bump', or protrusion, that is present on the female connector, on the motherboard ]

2) The Power Supply must also have a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

On the illustration where it states Socket AM2 is the Processor socket.

To the left, and down a little of the Processor socket, is a blank square.
The writing under it is illegible.

This is where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in.

On the motherboard photo it is to the left of the white Processor socket, and is square in shape, with four socket holes.

This is a better look at a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Color of the plastic used in the connectors, does not matter.

3) Looking at the Specifications page, you will see that the Power Supply must have at least 1 SATA power cable.
It's used for the 250GB SATA harddrive.

Closer look at a SATA power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

NOTE*
If the SATA harddrive in your computer has a place for a SATA power cable, and a 4-pin Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable.
DO NOT use both.

4) Again looking at the Specifications page, the Power Supply must have at least two, 4-pin Peripheral power cables.
Used for the optical drives.
(DVD drives)

A closer look at a 4-pin Peripheral power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

There may be more 4-pin Peripheral power cables needed, to run any computer case fans.

[The Processor fan plugs into the motherboard ]

An example of an ATX power supply that is 500 Watt rated, and has the correct amount of power cables, plus the correct type of power cables,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3255392&sku=ULT-LS500



Jun 21, 2010 | HP Pavilion a6000n (882780985018) PC...

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