Question about Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

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Mutiple images Focused on one bright star, I'm getting three images. The central one is brighter but there is one above & one below. Treied it withanother bright star with same result. Can this be corrected?

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The problem could be a vitreal spartion in your eye. Whe looing at a bright star does the images appaer to remain in place when you twist your head around the eyepiece. Do others see the same thing???

If they do then it sounds like a cracked element. This can occur in the eyepiece if the scope has ever been turned to the sun.

Change the eyepiece and see if the problem goes away. If it doesn't then a chipped or cracked primary or secondary is suspect.
Good Luck

Posted on Aug 22, 2008

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Am I supposed to see the cross in the centre of image on celestron 76eq


You will see diffrection spikes when focused on a very bright object

http://www.goldastro.com/images/newtonian.jpg

and this can also appear around a bright planet. However it is very irritating, and to minimise it, make sure your scope is well collimated (optically aligned).

There is too much to collimation to include here, but there are many guides on the Net

http://www.cloudynights.com/documents/primer.pdf

http://www.atmsite.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/

Feb 22, 2012 | Celestron FirstScope 76EQ (180 x 76mm)...

Tip

So you bought a COMPUTER GOTO Telescope!


First the good news. Personally I believe a computer GOTO scope or a Dobsonian telescope with PUSHTO makes a great telescope for a beginner.

Why? Because you can use the hand controller to help you find those dim sky objects that are almost invisible from a typical suburban observing site with lots of light pollution.

Also if you pay attention you will learn many of the brighter stars in the sky, the Constellations, and the location of many of the brighter sky objects.

Now for the bad news. There are many cheap goto telescope systems being sold that do not work as advertised, and you still need APERTURE to see many of the dimmer sky objects. So a goto with a little 70mm refractor mounted on it will frustrate you!

Right off the bat let me list a few links to the better goto and pushto telescopes. See these web sites:

http://www.telescope.com/control/product/~category_id=intelliscopedobs/~pcategory=dobsonians/~product_id=27183

http://www.meade.com/lx90/index.html

http://www.celestron.com/c3/product.php?CatID=9&ProdID=33

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0023RRD9Y/ref=asc_df_B0023RRD9Y994674?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=googlecom09c9-20&linkCode=asn&creative=380341&creativeASIN=B0023RRD9Y
This is just the mount, you need to also buy the telescope tube. I would suggest a 6 inch Celestron SCT Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), and also what is called a "dovetail" metal bar to mount the scope tube onto the side of this goto mount.

http://www.celestron.com/c3/product.php?CatID=8&ProdID=31

http://www.celestron.com/c3/product.php?CatID=11&ProdID=392 This is a computerized equitorial mount. It works differently than the scopes listed above.

http://www.celestron.com/c3/product.php?CatID=13&ProdID=415

That should be enough to get you thinking! All of the ones listed above will have good goto performance IF:

You read the manual TWICE!

Test the scope out INSIDE in the light before you take it out at night and learn how to operate the hand controller.

Follow all the instructions in the manual about training the drives and or calibrating motors.

Accurately center BOTH alignment stars. Yes you will need to learn the names of a few stars in the sky.

AND NEVER plug or unplug the hand controller while the scope is turned on! This can burn out the circuits in the scope!

I would suggest that your first goto telescope be like the very first link above; a Dobsonian with a PUSHTO hand controller. This is the cheapest and best entry point to own a computer telescope. Yes, the prices are a little higher and old timers will tell you you do not need the computer goto to find objects in the sky.

I disagree! Beginners get very frustrated with the hobby when they cannot find anything other than the moon or several bright planets; or search for several hours to find one other dim sky object. Also most of us live in light polluted cities, and hopping around from star to star to find something is not really possible.

Add eye problems like cataracts and you will only see 6 or 7 stars in the sky, not enough to use to find other sky objects.

If you decide to buy a GOTO scope, please attend several star parties at your local Astronomy club. Many of the members will have this kind of telescope. You can ask questions, and they may even let you DRIVE the telescope!

Remember, READ the manual, train the drives, and do all the other initial setup that the manual recommends. Yes, you will need to know the names of a few bright stars in the sky! Your new computer telescope is not as smart as 3CPO in Star Wars!

Clear Skies!
Joe Lalumia



on Dec 31, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

The images of deep sky objects (such as M31 M8 ...) I get with my LXD75 (SN 8") are faint. The images of the solar system (Moon, Jupiter...) are decent. Should I proceed to a collimation ?


NO- the objects are much dimmer than the planets and your camera must take a LONGER exposure to get an image.

Collimation makes stars and planets "sharper" but NOT BRIGHTER.

Many deep sky objects require 10-15 minute exposures!

Aug 08, 2010 | Meade LXD75 8.0"/203mm f/4.0 Telescope OTA...

1 Answer

Having a clear sky last night i took my new scope out and started to view the night sky, but focusing on a star ! i found that when viewing it at magnification a could clearly see the the area infront of...


Stars are ALWAYS pinpoints of light when the scope is focused no matter how much magnification is applied.

You are NOT focused properly -- when you are you cannot see the secondary mirror or the "spider" bracket that holds the mirror.

You will NEVER see a star as a disk, only as a pinpoint light. If you are seeing what looks like a donut with a dark center you are not focused.

May 07, 2010 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Why is the cap at the end smaller thna the


Yes, that's the point of it.

Remove the entire (full diameter) cap for stellar and planetary viewing, or just the smaller diameter central cap for viewing the Moon which is far brighter and is too bright without either adding a neutral density filter or by partially masking the optical tube assembly.

Feb 24, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

I bought a skyquest xt10i telescope and am trying


A star is always just a point of light no matter what magnification you use! If you are seeing a "disk" when you focus on a star you are NOT focused! Make it a tiny dot.

Why not try focusing on the moon or Mars and Saturn. You will always need to re=focus slightly when you move to another sky object.

Feb 22, 2010 | Orion SkyQuest XT10 (600 x 254mm)...

1 Answer

Start Align with NexStar 4SE


Did you enter the correct TIME, DATE, and LOCATION? and yes you may have aligned on to the wrong stars -- they need to be "near" the center.

Feb 04, 2009 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

Obscured view through telescope


You can slow down dew forming on the mirror by NOT pointing the telescope toward the sky during cool-down-- just leave it parallel to the ground. Same goes for your eyepieces -- leave them covered, or inside a case.

Dec 26, 2008 | Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Telescope

2 Answers

Fuzzy bright stars with my Celestron CPC 1100 XLT


The image shows that the optics are not centered properly. The secondary may be tilted slightly to the 2 o'clock position. When not centered, a focused star will have an astigmatic shape, and not come to a full focus. Also check the mirror and corrector plate for dewing, that will also affect the views.

Nov 02, 2008 | Optics

4 Answers

Tasco Space Station 800 x 70 Telescope


You are only going to be able to see the moon and several of the brighter planets-- and maybe a few bright star clusters -- like M44.

Practice focusing during the daytime on a distant object-- and only use the eyepiece with the LARGEST number written on it-- try to locate a local Astronomy club and attend one of their free star parties.

Mar 03, 2008 | Optics

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