Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

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Instruction manual need instruction manual for paasonic DMC-F27 I get my camera to take shots with the subject in focus and the background blurred / not focussed. Is this possible with this camera. If so what settings do you need to do it?

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Hi,

I have an FZ7K, here’s what I do:

#1. Set the mode dial on top of the camera to “A”.
#2. Set the aperture to the smallest f/number possible, f/2.8, f/3.2, f/3.3.
#3. Now take pictures standing as close to the subject as possible, (or zoom the lens).

For even better results, have the background farther away from your subject.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

Hi,

I have an FZ7K, here’s what I do:

#1. Set the mode dial on top of the camera to “A”.
#2. Set the aperture to the smallest f/number possible, f/2.8, f/3.2, f/3.3.
#3. Now take pictures standing as close to the subject as possible, (or zoom the lens).

For even better results, have the background farther away from your subject.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

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I shot close to the things that often have blur problem, so I think is the focus problem, i dunno how to adjust, it always have some part which is blur.


The closer you are to the subject, the less will be in focus. This can be a good thing as it can be used to separate the subject from the background. Also, when you get super close, you may need to set the camera in "macro" mode.

Sep 15, 2010 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

PORTRAIT SETTING ON Canon Powershot A710 IS GIVES EXACTLY SAME PHOTO AS ON AUTOMATIC. NEED I ACTIVATE SOMETHING ELSE TO GET A BLURRED BACKGROUND?


Portrait provides extra sharp focus on the subject. It also opens the aperture some, and may in SOME cases give you a blurred backbround depending on the distance of the subject and background to the camera.

If outdoors, consider setting the camera to manual flash so that it will lighten the subject. If indoors, consider turning off the flash. You may need to provide better external lighting on the subject, or use a tripod and ask the subject to hold still during the picture.

Try increasing the zoom (best is to set it to maximum), and then adjust your distance from the subject to get as close as possible. Note that you still might be standing relatively far away because of the zoom.

Another way to experiment further with focus and blurred backgrounds is to use aperture priority (Av) mode on your dial. Use the right/left button to set the lowest "f-number" on your screen. The lower the number, the greater the aperture. All other functions of your camera will automatically compensate. Again, use max zoom in taking closeups with low "f-numbers". Also experiment with the manual focus to pay particular attention to achieving sharp focus on your subjects eyes.

You have a very capable camera. It can do what you're thinking of. You just need to practice with it. It's digital, experiment with the above techniques. Throw away the bad pics and keep the good, noting which technique worked best for the lighting and situation.

Dec 28, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A710 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

When I take a video, it blurs in and out every 2-3 seconds while I'm recording.


It is probably auto focussing on a moving subject or you are moving the camera making it focus more often.

Oct 25, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-N2 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focus problems with Nikon D700


use center fous mode dont keep multi focusing mode

Jun 17, 2009 | Nikon D700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon rebel xsi trying to focus on subject and distort the background


If you want the background to be blurred in a shot, you will need to move closer to the subject, recompose the image, and shoot. Since you're shooting digital, I strongly recommend a lot of practicing shooting at different distances and F-stops to determine what you're looking for.

Pls rate if helpful.
Thanks!

Sep 17, 2008 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Digital slr camera


You'll need to use your camera in manual mode.

If you want the subject sharp, but the background blurred, use a large aperture and high speed exposure. This will reduce the focal length.

Remember that a large apertures are often used for night shots because they allow more light through the lense. A fast exposure will prevent the shot from being over exposed if you are taking it in daylight.

Flash photography is not recommended for the effect you are after.

Mar 24, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Slight blur shooting variety of subjects


It is just a possibility but you may have overrode the auto focus. If you accidentally move the focussing ring it disables the auto focus.

Mar 17, 2008 | Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR...

6 Answers

Instruction manual


When I put in a memory card with pictures that someone else took with their camera nothing shows up. Actually it seems like my camera freezes. Please help.

Dec 28, 2007 | Largan Chameleon XP Digital Camera

2 Answers

Blurred background


In general, a digicam like the fz15 uses such small lenses (true focal length, not 35mm equivalent) and sensors that they have greater depth of field than a DSLR will have. The only way to really reduce it is to use f/2.8 and full zoom. Also it's reduced the closer the subject is to the lens.

Sep 07, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ15 Digital Camera

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