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Probably too simple to be true .. but I have a 'record player' in an old car, and the small motor that drives the turntable is running in reverse (incorrect) direction. Is thi simple a matter of 'polarizing' or some such thing. Probably simple to you , but well .. I need some advice and would appreciate it. Remember this is a tiny motor .. 12V , 1 1/2 " dia ... Thanks for you help Ed 313 399-5110

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Hi,

I agree, it is old. None the less, yes on reversing the wiring of the motor. All DC motors are polarity affected.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards. Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Aug 19, 2008

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