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7/50 Magnification binoculare

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Hold binos up to your eyes.....open and close to fit your eye span.......adjust left eye with center wheel ...then adjust right eye with right eyepiece ...www.reichinstruments.com

Posted on Aug 18, 2008

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

Whats the major problem with supergiants


They're big, heavy and awkward to use, and the image is over-magnified for the size of the objective giving less than ideal image quality and brightness. A general rule (especially if using for astronomy) is that the objective divided by the magnification should never be less than 5. With 20x80's it's a less than ideal 4 so you'll miss out on many fainter objects completely. They can be excellent for lunar observation though as the Moon is so bright.

The high magnification also makes them almost impossible to hand hold steadily enough unless a tripod (or monopod) is used, adding more bulk and awkwardness.

Sep 28, 2010 | Zhumell SuperGiant Astronomical Binocular

1 Answer

Why are my pics so blurry?


Because of the magnification any unsteadiness in your hands is multiplied. Try to brace your elbows or put the camera on something steady. About 1/2 second after you click the button is when you hear a little beep. That's the moment you ahve to hold the camera very still.

Also, I wear glasses with a strong correction, I get better pictures when I take them off to focus the binoculars.

Oct 14, 2009 | Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular

1 Answer

I am trying to find out what is 6x20


Binoculars are often refered to as "N x NN" which typically refers to the magnification and the size in millimeters of the front lenses (called the "objective" lenses). 6x20 refers to 20mm front lenses (about 3/4 inch) with 6x magnification. These would be useful as opera glasses, or for spotting birds in a small backyard.

The "N x NN" designation doesn't say anything about the quality of the binoculars - just the physical size and magnification.

Oct 06, 2009 | HiStar 6x20 Sportbinox

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Is my bushnell insta vision 7x35 or 10x50- how do I tell ?


The first number is the magnification the second number is the size in millimeters of the objective (large lens) So if you measure the diameter of the front large lens that will give you the size. So a 10x50 means a magnifyng power of 10 and an objective of 50mm.
Now to find out the magnification if you don't know what it is. Measure the front lens. Then if you look through the eyepiece lens while holding it away from you you will see that there is in each a small circle of light. That it what is known as the exit pupil. It lines up with the pupil of your eyes when you have the binoculars pressed up against your eyes. Now measure the diameter of the exit pupil in millimeters. It will only be a small number.

To work out the magnification use this formula. Magnification = Objective size divided by the exit pupil.
So a 10x50 will look like this M = 50 divided by 5....therefore M =10 which is the magnification.

Both the 7x35 and 10x50 will have an exit pupil of 5mm. So if yours is one of these then all you need is the objective (large) lens size.

Aug 04, 2009 | Bushnell InstaVision Binocular Binocular

1 Answer

I bought these for my husband. In trying them


Difficult to answer specifically without knowing the model. But binoculars are designed to view objects in the distance. They all have a limit as to how close they will focus based on the magnification and design. Objective lenses that are far apart such as on a porro prism binocular will not focus very close. The nature of the design of having the objectives further apart than the eyepieces doesn't allow it. When trying to focus too close the image will appear blurred and double. That is the nature of the design. 9 feet or 3 metres is considered quite close to focus a binocular and is usually for a model designed to do this such as a roof prism where the objective lens and the eye lenses are inline. A specialty binocular such as the Pentax Papilo will close focus to 50 centimeters. It has been designed so that the objective (large lenses) lenses converge.

Take into account when focusing that binoculars are also designed to compensate for differences in each eye. One of the eyepieces either right or left will adjust seperately. For binoculars with a center focus ring. First focus using the center ring with one eye covered. The eye that should be covered is the one that doesn't have the adjusting eyepiece. When the image is clear close the eye you have just used and leave the center focus alone. Focusing on the same spot look through the eyepiece that adjusts and turn the eyepiece ring until the image is clear. Now all you have to do is focus using the center ring only as the binoculars are adjusted for each eye.

Some binoculars do not have a center focus and each eye will adjust seperately.

Jul 29, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

My Nikon Action 16 X 50--4.1 --serial number 715480BJ


id take thm back then the prisems may be out of line

Jan 29, 2008 | Nikon Action Binoculars

1 Answer

Double vision


The distance between the centers of the eyepieces of your binocular must be the same as the distance between your pupils. This distance is adjusted as follows: 1. Focus on a distant object. 2. Pivot the two halves of your binocular farther or closer apart until you can see a single unobstructed, circular field of view. Make sure to focus on a distant object when you do this because when you focus on a close object you always see two slightly overlapping circular fields. Your binocular may have a scale on the top, between the eyepieces, to help you remember this setting.

Jul 03, 2007 | Bushnell Powerview - Compact 10 x 25...

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