Question about Canon EOS Rebel X 35mm SLR Camera

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Blue photos?? after developing my pictures at cvs the result was an entire pack of blued out photos?? what camera setting pertains to this result? what happened??

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No filter on lens,right? heat damage to the film,or the film was not processed correctly, or outdated.
way over exposure is also apossibility. take your new exposed film to a different processor.

Posted on Dec 15, 2008

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Why is the white background not white?


This is a common problem. The metering and light balance are the reasons that you are having problems achieving good results with your photos.

All cameras on the auto cycle are calibrated for 18% gray. Another words a photo of all white results in 18% gray. A photo of black results in 18% gray. The camera adjusts the shutter speed and aperture to achieve an average light level of 18%. That is why photos of snow always appear gray. To compensate for this characteristic of the cameras an 18 % gray panel is held in front of the camera and than the settings are set.manually. The metering in the camera is now locked and using the same light levels objects will be in their natural level.

A second problem is the white balance. Using flash avoids some of these problems. Adjusting the camera for source lighting type will help the most. The light balance is the cause of discoloration of the objects in the photo. Usually the camera white balance can be set for auto, incandescent, fluorescent, outdoor or flash,

Use a manual setting if it is available on you camera, You need to adjust the settings until you get acceptable results. If the photo is dark add light by reducing the aperture number to a lower number allowing more light. After the aperture is open wide(lowest number) increase the exposure to longer time. With very low light levels a tripod may be necessary.. After doing this once record the numbers for next time.

Nov 15, 2015 | Nikon COOLPIX L100 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I put a fresh new pack of film into my Fuji film instax 210 camera but only used it to take two pictures. The next day when I tried to take a picture, it came out completely white. Why is that? It is very...


Completely white photos on an Instax, or any instant camera means the film has been exposed somehow. Check to be sure the film door is completely closed, and latched properly. If it is, it's possible, though unlikely, that your camera's shutter is stuck open. It'd be easy to check, simply look at the front of your camera into the lens, and see if you see any mechanical bits, now take a picture and see if you see any of them move - movement means working, no movement means not. If the entire camera back opens (I'm not sure if it does) you can also open it and do the same thing, looking to see if you see light through the camera when you're looking through the lens but not taking a picture - if you do the lense is stuck open. This, however, would require removing and wasting whatever film is remaining in it right now.

Aug 30, 2011 | FUJIFILM Instax 210 Film Camera

1 Answer

Take a phot and the phot dosent come out?. Yes there is a new film in the camera


Unless you bought the photo pack recently from The Impossible Project, then it's not new at all and is long past it's use by date.

Polaroid photo packs have the camera battery built into them, and by now every single one will either be stone cold dead or with only just about enough power to eject the cover slide and power the shutter. Even if the battery did work, you'd find the photo chemicals have also gone stale, producing odd colour casts, uneven contrast and usually the camera eject rollers fail to squeeze the chemicals right across the photo fully into the far corners. If the photo pack has been stored refrigerated the whole time before use then the chemistry may be good but the battery will definitely be as dead as a dodo as cold kills batteries.

You only have two fixes:-

1. Remove the current photo pack in total darkness and store it in a light-proof bag, and then modify the camera to take an externally switched 6V dc power supply (it only really needs 4.5V, but 6V is fine and easier/cheaper to get batteries/transformers for). Then replace your photo pack, it will wastefully self-eject the top photo as if it was a cover slide. As the camera was never designed to be dismantled this often results in a broken camera, but they are ten a penny at thrift shops and charity stores and easily available for free via FreeCycle/Freegle.

2. Remove and discard the current photo pack and replace it with a new one from The Impossible Project. Note that they are not the same as the original material: there's only 8 shots instead of 10 and the results are less predictable and far more prone to fading, so scan photos after taking them to preserve the images. The material is aimed far more at artistic users who wish to manipulate the images during development.

Feb 28, 2011 | Polaroid One600 Pro Instant Camera

1 Answer

Picture does not eject


Polaroid photo packs have the camera battery built into them, and by now every single one will either be stone cold dead or with only just about enough power to eject the cover slide and power the shutter. Even if the battery did work, you'd find the photo chemicals have also gone stale, producing odd colour casts, uneven contrast and usually the camera eject rollers fail to squeeze the chemicals right across the photo fully into the far corners. If the photo pack has been stored refrigerated the whole time before use then the chemistry may be good but the battery will definitely be as dead as a dodo as cold kills batteries.

You only have two fixes:-

1. Remove the current photo pack in total darkness and store it in a light-proof bag, and then modify the camera to take an externally switched 6V dc power supply (it only really needs 4.5V, but 6V is fine and easier/cheaper to get batteries/transformers for). Then replace your photo pack, it will wastefully self-eject the top photo as if it was a cover slide. As the camera was never designed to be dismantled this often results in a broken camera, but they are ten a penny at thrift shops and charity stores and easily available for free via FreeCycle/Freegle.

2. Remove and discard the current photo pack and replace it with a new one from The Impossible Project. Note that they are not the same as the original material: there's only 8 shots instead of 10 and the results are less predictable and far more prone to fading, so scan photos after taking them to preserve the images. The material is aimed far more at artistic users who wish to manipulate the images during development.

Feb 21, 2011 | Polaroid Spectra AF Instant Camera

1 Answer

How many photos do you get from a film? how many photos do you get out of the battery?


On the only photo packs now available you get 8 shots per pack. The battery is built into the photo pack and is replaced every time you replace the photo pack, so you only get eight shots from it.

Original photo packs are all now long out of date and are mostly useless as the batteries have all gone so flat that they won't last an entire photo pack. The chemicals inside the photos are also usually stale and so produce odd results if you use the photo packs on a camera modified to take an external power supply.

New photo packs are now available from The Impossible Project.

Feb 21, 2011 | Polaroid 600 Business Edition Instant...

1 Answer

Pictures are not developping


That will be because the photo pack is stale. The chemicals it uses do not last forever, there is no fix for this.

Many will be, given that they're all past their expiry date and none have been manufactured for two and a half years. Usually the main problem is that the battery built in to the photo pack is either flat or only has insufficient power to get through all ten photos.

As a rule, packs kept in the fridge will have freshest chemistry but almost always a dead battery, and those kept in warm conditions will have stale chemicals and maybe a battery which will last the entire pack. Not much use though...

Feb 05, 2010 | Polaroid One600 Pro Instant Camera

1 Answer

2 rolls out of a 3-pack ruined.


I would suggest you buy an off-brand roll of 12 or 24 exposures. Run it through the camera taking snaps of anything -- but make sure you vary the lighting, ISO, shutter speed, aperture, etc. as you snap the pics. Don't worry too much about composition. This roll is a quick test, NOT for photos to keep.

Have the film developed and then follow-up with comments on the results. I'll gladly assist you further at that time.
Char1ieJ

Nov 11, 2008 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shooting modes


The Shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM (P)/AUTO Modes Used for general photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. In PROGRAM (P) the brightness (exposure compensation) can be adjusted. In AUTO mode you cannot use exposure compensation or panorama features. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Sports Suitable for capturing fast moving action without blurring. Even a fast moving object will appear to be stationary. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Nightscene + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of your subject in the evening or at night. This setting employs a slow shutter speed, the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Landscape + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the landscape. This setting allows for both the foreground subject and background landscape to be in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is locked to wide-angle and cannot be changed. Indoor Optimum settings for taking pictures of family gatherings and groups of friends. This mode reproduces the background clearly capturing the atmosphere. Beach Suitable for taking photos at the beach under a bright blue sky. Colors of the sky, the beach and people are reproduced vividly. Snow Optimun settings for taking pictures where backgrounds are snow fields. Settings are similar to Beach settings and colors of the sky, the greenery and people are reproduced vividly. Fireworks Optimum settings for capturing fireworks in the night sky. Since this setting employs a slow shutter speed , the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Sunset Optimum settings for capturing pictures of the setting sun. This mode reproduces reds and yellows vibrantly. Again, this setting employs a slow shutter speed , the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus D-595 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shooting modes


The Shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM (P)/AUTO Modes Used for general photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. In PROGRAM (P) the brightness (exposure compensation) can be adjusted. In AUTO mode you cannot use exposure compensation or panorama features. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Sports Suitable for capturing fast moving action without blurring. Even a fast moving object will appear to be stationary. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Nightscene + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of your subject in the evening or at night. This setting employs a slow shutter speed, the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Landscape + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the landscape This setting allows for both the foreground subject and background landscape to be in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is locked to wide-angle and cannot be changed. Indoor Optimum settings for taking pictures of family gatherings and groups of friends. This mode reproduces the background clearly capturing the atmosphere. Beach Suitable for taking photos at the beach under a bright blue sky. Colors of the sky, the beach and people are reproduced vividly. Snow Optimun settings for taking pictures where backgrounds are snow fields. Settings are similar to Beach settings and colors of the sky, the greenery and people are reproduced vividly. Fireworks Optimum settings for capturing fireworks in the night sky. Since this setting employs a slow shutter speed , the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Sunset Optimum settings for capturing pictures of the setting sun. This mode reproduces reds and yellows vibrantly. Again, this setting employs a slow shutter speed, the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus D-545 Zoom Digital Camera

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