Question about Makita Tools 18V 1/2" Lxt Lithium - Ion Hammer Driver - Drill Kit - BHP451

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Problem charging makita batteries 18v li-ion - Makita Tools 18V 1/2" Lxt Lithium - Ion Hammer Driver - Drill Kit - BHP451

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  • Anonymous Sep 09, 2008

    Rechargable 18v Lithium Ion battery packs keep failing - or at least the charging base indicates they're bad and refuses to charge them. Have gone through 3 battery packs that have only taken maybe 10-20 charges before showing up on the charger as 'bad'.

  • Anonymous Oct 13, 2008

    I have the same problem the charger won't charge and states it's broken

  • fwcarpentry2 Oct 18, 2008

    i am also having the same problem. it will charge one battery but not the other. it is less than a year old.

  • Anonymous Jan 08, 2009

    I have the same problem. Batteries only charged a couple of times and then will not charge. Charger indicated battery is broken.

  • Anonymous Jan 16, 2009

    I have same problem. bl 1830 . wont charge.

  • Anonymous Feb 07, 2009

    lights on charger indicate battery failure, but battery has been tested and i was told had no problems.



  • iammine311 Mar 10, 2009

    yes yes yes... more than coincidence... less than 6 moths in... still charges one battery but not the second... indicates "broken" status.

  • Anonymous Mar 28, 2009

    I got my drill about a year ago. Both battery packs worked and recharged fine for about the first six months, then one of them stopped charging, even though the charger light indicates it is fully charged. Now, the other pack has stopped working as well.

  • bipd818 Mar 29, 2009

    I have the same problem.  I have two new 18v Li-ion 1.5 Ah batteries.  One charges just fine and the other won't charge.  The charger indicates the battery is "broken".  I understand there are three separate parameters the Makita charger uses to "evaluate" the battery before charging.  Is there a way to fool or override the charger's evaluation to force charging?

  • skipe Apr 14, 2009

    I have the same problem with my 18v lithium batteries, bought 6 new batteries exactly 1 year ago,(april 10th 2008) 1 refused to charge around 3 months ago, 3 have 'broken' within the last week. exactly 1 year to the day i started using them.

  • kevlar3344 May 06, 2009

    i had my drill for just 1 year, then guess what all three batteries stopped charging, the was only used as a screw gun, very light use only, i had a dewalt drill for 4 years & worked it like a sled dog & it still holds more charge than these makita, i tried to contact makita rep but no help

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Unfortunately, Makita’s li-ion battery packs have a design flaw. After having the same problem with my two batteries, I took it apart and saw the problem immediately. You see each battery pack has ten li-ion battery cells and a circuit board with a memory chip witch holds the charging history of the battery pack. But that memory chip constantly draws power from 2 of the 10 batteries. The current it draws is very small but if you consider it over 8 month or more, the power drain becomes very significant. You end up with a battery pack with 8 still fully charged battery cells and 2 drained battery cells. When you put this battery pack in the charger, it detects weak battery cells, assumes they are defective and refuses to charge. To avoid this problem you should charge your battery pack often, even if you haven't used it, every two months should be ok.
I suspect that Makita doesn’t make these battery packs, they make power tools, good ones too. Buy Makita should definitely have a few words with their supplier before they become a liability!

Posted on May 25, 2009

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Welcome to the trials and tribulations of cordless power tools. Essentially they're not meant for intermittent (ie handyman) use. Li-Ion batteries, unlike Nicads have no memory effect and can be regularly topped up, but are designed to run no less than 40% charged and hence the circuitry to prevent that. The reason for that 40% base charge is well appreciated by Toyota with its Prius hybrid, which allows their $4500 battery pack to last 10 years plus unlike a full plug-in which would see such a fully drained to fully charged battery last only around 3 years. With that 40% lower level threshold you can appreciate why cordless Li-Ion batteries need 3Ah ratings instead of commonly 2Ah for professional Nicads. The best bang for buck batteries are still Nicads PROVIDING they're charged and discharged fully on a regular rotation basis AND they are rejuvenated every 30-50 charges by a special forming charger to prevent crystallisation, which occurs rapidly if left in a discharged state. NiCad and NiMH batteries run down at 1% a day standing, so you can see the problem after say 3 months idle. That's why Sanyo developed their Eneloop pre-charged AA and AAA batteries that hold 90% of their charge after 6 months and 85% after 12 months. Ever reached for the digital camera after a few months with standard rechargeables and wondered why it won't go? Not a problem with those special lattice chemistry Eneloops, which makes you wonder if their technology will transfer to cordless power tools any time soon. My advice? Tradeys stick to Nicads with manual refresh chargers like Hilti has and Homies to power cords. If you use AAs and AAAs a lot, then Sanyo Eneloop it is, with a MAHA Powerex smart charger for the requisite 'rejuvenation' cycle periodically.(most chargers on the market are dumb chargers) Forget all the other ignorance and sales pitches out there with current battery technology. Oh and another tip for the Tradyeys. Stop mucking around with 18V cordless driver drill brands because you think 18V tools are for 'real men'. My research and site experience with many failing clutches shows they are often overpowered for their typical 35-45Nm clutches, whereas Hilti's range is rated at 70Nm. You wants to play you gots to pay!

Posted on Jul 03, 2009

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What is the battery or charger not doing correctly?

Posted on Aug 17, 2008

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Its definatly the battery. i just bought a new set because one of the batteries wouldn't charge-it was fine right up to the moment the charger refused. I plugged this into the brand new charger and it refuses to charge it as well. Do you think it has a memory and counts how many charges its has then stops when it thinks you've had enough use out of it or is out of date irregardless if it works or not (just like the hp inkjet cartridges)?

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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Do you have to charge the batterys over night before use?

Posted on Sep 20, 2012

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  • Makita Master
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Problems with long inactive batteries can *(sometimes) be safe analized by service who have
Battery Analyzers

Posted on Jul 01, 2016

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To fix "bad" Makita batteries that won't charge: Put them in the charger FIRST and then plug the charger in.

Posted on Mar 12, 2015

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Ite seems to be the batterys that dont come from makitta. dont buy the after market batterys, its so easy for the companys to blame you for there poor product..

Posted on Oct 01, 2012

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SOURCE: I have a li-ion Makita BL1830 18V 3.0Ah battery

Sorry Mate your battery is dead...
The makita lithium batterys dont like getting worked hard quickly.
There is a chip in them that recognice each battery to each specific charger. Try another charger. This has not worked for me. Try anyway

Posted on Nov 27, 2009

  • 14 Answers

SOURCE: Makita BR1815 li-ion batteries won't charge

your batteries are toast;must replace

Posted on Aug 02, 2009

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1 Answer

How can I reset chip on my Makita lithium ion 18v battery


Based on experience I can tell you that it is is generally the temperature/cutoff/individual cell monitoring sensor in charger that dont allow the batteries to take a charge. Once the same condition is detected 3 times by the same charger it considers the batteries to be bad and refuses to accept it. I have 2 batteries that wont charge on one charger but works perfectly fine when i charge it on my other Makita charger so basically there is no problem with my batteries.
I would suggest first you check the voltage of your drained battery by a test multimeter. For 18volt battery if it is close to 18volts 1-2 volts less is just fine! Then there is no issue with your battery. Makita chargers are very expensive hitech which is useless in my opinion the lipo chargers (used in rc hobby) example skyrc are better quality cheaper and does a better job and you can easily charge your makita battery with it as well but this is only recommended if you decide not to go with Makita charger any more. Some basic information about multi chargers for Li-ion battery to follow the safety is make sure you use the right connectors with correct polarity. For 18v volts max voltage should not exceed more than 20.50 and the allowable charge current is 2.7amps also ensuring that batteries dont heatup.

Oct 05, 2014 | Makita 2 Bl1830 18v Battery,dc18ra Charger...

1 Answer

Can you use 18v lithium battery in old 18v drill


Yes you can. On tools, 18 volts is 18 volts. Tools don't 'know' how the power is being created, either by Ni-Cad or Li-Ion means. Chargers are totally different. Most Li-Ion chargers can charge older Ni-Cad and some Ni-MH batteries but older Ni-Cad chargers will charge Li-Ion battery untill they overheat and sometimes start on fire because older chargers can't detect when the Li-Ion batteries are full.

Jan 14, 2013 | Black & Decker 18V Cordless Drill/Driver

1 Answer

Why will a makita Li-ion 1.3ah battery not fit in other makita tools?


Some of the Makita 18v LXT tools require the BL1830 3.0AH battery and are designed that the 1.5AH battery will not fit.

Jan 12, 2013 | Makita 18V LXT Lithium - Ion Cordless...

1 Answer

I have a makita 6391D cordless drill with 18v ni-cd 1.3ah batteries, just had one battery and charger stolen so have to buy replacements is there any way i can convert it now to lithium batteries if


I can't find a Makita model 6391D drill but they do have a model 6390D drill that takes the 18V Ni-Cd pod battery. The tools and radio don't care what type of battery you use, only that they are 18V. However, to date, Makita does not make a Li-Ion, pod battery. All of their Li-Ion batteries are the slide-on type. Your options for that 18V tool is the 2.6ah Ni-MH battery (PN 193159-1 for a single or 194158-6 for a twin pack), the 2.0ah (PN 192827-3) and 1.3ah (PN 194107-3) Ni-Cd batteries.

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1 Answer

Three makita batteries wont charge 18v li-on


I did get an educated electronics eng. tell me li ion batteries 4handtools,are manufactured to only be recharged a set number of times,to avoid tool damage.

Oct 13, 2011 | Makita Tools 18V 1/2" Lxt Lithium - Ion...

2 Answers

One question please, I have makita cordlless


according to the schematic I saw yes you can and I think that you will be pleased with its performance, their operator manual even lists the weight of tool with this battery. Makita has a 1 year limited warranty on the Li-Ion battery that you might want to consider if you have the receipt.

May 11, 2011 | Makita 18V LXT Lithium - Ion Cordless...

1 Answer

I have a li-ion Makita BL1830 18V 3.0Ah battery that can't be charged...when on the charger the bottom two lights flash red..it will charge my other battery, so it doesn't seem to be the charger


Sorry Mate your battery is dead...
The makita lithium batterys dont like getting worked hard quickly.
There is a chip in them that recognice each battery to each specific charger. Try another charger. This has not worked for me. Try anyway

Nov 01, 2009 | Makita Tools 18V 1/2" Lxt Lithium - Ion...

2 Answers

Makita dc1804f charger will not charge new i-mh 1834 18v battery


I think your tryiong to charge NIMH batteries oon a charger designed for Lithium Ion batteries. With all the new style batteries such as NICAD, NIMH and LI-ION, charging becomes difficult. Most chargers pre NIMH and LI-ion, were designed for NICAD's. The best advise, match your batteries with the correct charger

Feb 06, 2008 | Makita 18V LXT Lithium - Ion Cordless...

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