Question about Sigma AF 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 DL Macro Super Lens for Canon-EOS

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Just bought this lens and the MACRO button doesn't move. is there something I have to do in order to switch it?

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  • John Strucke Jul 11, 2011

    Thanks, Mike. It took me a few times looking it over but I did eventually figure it out.. Thanks for your concern. This is really a nice lens; I've been quite surprised.

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You need to zoom past 200mm and then switch it to the macro setting. You will see a mark on the focus ring that you must put the ring past on coming out of macro

Posted on Jul 10, 2011

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2 Answers

How do i get the flashed turned on


First, check to make sure you're not in the macro mode. There's a slide switch on the end of the camera, near the SD card slot. Slide the switch away from the flower toward the mountain to take it out of macro mode. The flash won't fire in macro mode.

Then, if the flash still doesn't fire, take a look at the flash mode. Press the up-arrow button to bring up the flash menu. If it's currently set in the lightning-bolt-in-a-circle-with-a-slash-through-it symbol, you've got the flash turned off. Set it to the lightning-bolt-and-"A" for automatic flash or the lightning-bolt for forced flash.

If the flash still doesn't fire, then it's broken.

Sep 10, 2011 | Vivitar ViviCam 5024 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a trouble with my digital camera. When I put a lens on the camera I cannot get the shutter to open. I am using some older lens that I had for my manual pentax. Could this be the problem. When I have...


Hi Noodle
One of Pentax's strengths is that that you can use lenses from the late 1960s on them (via an adaptor). However, I'm assuming that you have a bayonet fitting lens - but as you say 'my manual pentax' could it be that they are not autofocus lenses?
If autofocus is switched on and you have a manual focus lens, you have to have something in focus in order for the shutter to fire. (with no lens fitted it doesn't seem to matter). Switch the camera to manual focus (where you can shoot out-of-focus stuff) and see if the problem is still there.
If it is then it spounds as though there is something amiss with the camera to lens coupling.

Jul 07, 2011 | Pentax *ist DL Digital Camera

1 Answer

Macro-normal button will not move


Glad to hear you're up and shooting again.

Feb 23, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Zuiko 70-300mm lens focusing problem


Haha!!
Maybe its something you're not doing, LOL.
Look on the side of the lens. Most of the 70-300 macros have a slide switch. My Tamron, for instance, needs to be zoomed out to 300, then slide the switch to Macro and its ok. Look for the slide switch. You might also notice lines of a different color to denote Macro.
Some days it too tough to be smarter than the lens,
LOL.

Dec 31, 2009 | Olympus Zuiko 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Digital ED...

1 Answer

I can't get the macro adapter to work ?


Put the macro adapter on the camera and move the camera in and out from an object to try to focus the object in the display. Remember, macro is very small, very close and very small field-of-focus. I hope this helps.

May 28, 2009 | Vivitar Telephoto 100mm f/3.5 Macro Manual...

1 Answer

Nikon D40 I bought a set of macro lenses that said they were compatible for the d40 but i cannot figure out how to fit them. They are 52mm lenses - should i have bought an adaptor or something? where...


Macro lenses are mounted to your camera body in place of the lens you currently have mounted on the camera. If you bought the camera with the lens already mounted you may not have realized that the camera and lens are 2 separate objects. To remove your lens see page 8 in your user manual for instructions and an illustration. If you don't have your user manual handy, you can download a PDF file from NikonUSA Here.

If what you bought are macro rings, they go on the camera, then your regular lens mounts onto the ring. You can use one or more of the rings between the lens and camera to produce different macro settings.

If what you bought are macro filters, they screw on to the front of your lens. If you have a UV filter on your lens you need to remove that before you attach another filter.

Dec 22, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

I think I messed something up on my lens.


You are correct that the switch locks the aperture. In order for your camera to function correctly in the auto-focus mode you must lock the aperture to the smallest opening (largest number such as f22). The switch has two positions. The position where the switch is lined up with the orange line is the locked position. When the lens functions properly and on the camera, the lens aperture is forced wide open by a pin on the camera body pushing a lever on the lens that opens the aperture. As part of the sequence when you push the shutter button, the camera releases its pressure on the spring-loaded lever on the lens, allowing the aperture to close to the setting that the "computer" has determined as correct. You will find this lever on the outside of the black ring that surrounds the rear lens element. With the lens removed, find the lever and make sure that with the lens set to the f22, sliding the lever counter-clockwise against the slight spring tension, the aperture opens wide and returns to f22 when released. If this is not the case, the problem is in the lens. If this works, then the problem is either in your camera body or in the alignment between the body and lens. If this does not get you on the right track, let me know what you find and we will proceed from there.

Nov 23, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

How do you go from zoom to macro?


From my experience, many zoom lenses that have a macro feature simply kicks into macro mode when the lens is in fully zoomed position. Remember, macro is used to take pictures of something (usually like a flower, insect, etc.) and to magnify it several or many times larger than it really it is. And as a result the subject is huge and sharply focused with a very blurry background. Another thing to keep in mind is that there is usually a focusing limit for the lens in terms of how close one can focus a subject in MACRO zoom mode. In other words, you (the lens) may have to be at least a foot or more away from the subject in order to automatically focus sharply. On this note, if you have manual focusing capability, you should be able to take pictures in macro zoom mode from even shorter distance from the subject, resulting in more larger than life pictures!

Good luck!

I Can Fix it

Sep 03, 2008 | Tamron 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 LD Lens for...

2 Answers

Canon Powershot S2 IS Super Macro mode


Make sure your camera isn't zoomed in (full telephoto) The camera can't handle both full zoom AND super macro. Don't forget super macro goes from Zero to 20cm from the lens. Zoom completely out and you should be able to see something within that range. The biggest complaint I've heard about the S2 IS is if you take closeups of bugs the chances of the bug crawling onto your lens is pretty good.:-) Be very carefull of blocking light with the lens at extreme closeup too. Although the flash squelches well to allow for closeups it can leave a nasty shadow. If you're really serious about macro you'll find a ring flash would come in handy. BMW

Jul 13, 2006 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

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