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Freon not flowing back to condenser - American Standard Heating & Cooling

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Http://www.air-conditioning-and-refrigeration-guide.com/central-air-conditioning-condenser-problem.html

Posted on May 26, 2011

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The coils jeep freezing up I have cleaned the filter


usually means Freon charge is low, you might have a leak..... also, filters don't catch everything. over time what gets past the filter can be trapped in underside of the evaporative coil on top of your furnace..... outside condenser coils may be caked with debris, improper air flow threw coils can produce liquid Freon back to evaporative coil causing it to freeze..
hosing the condenser down will resolve freezing up too

Oct 04, 2015 | Filter Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

The outside of the freezer is extremely HOT..It is cooling inside. It is in our garage and we have had 39 days of over 100 degree weather. Should we be concerned with this?


Normally when the cabinet is extremely hot it is an indication that the condenser grill is not getting enough airflow accross it to cool down the freon. Then could be because the condenser fan is not operating or the condenser grill is dirty or there is no front to back air flow.

So first thing you need to do is check and make sure the condenser fan is working (the one under your unit). If it isn't then replace the fan motor. If it is functional, then clean the condenser grill (the one underneath the unit) and if that is not the problem, then I would suggest you raise your frigerater up (put on a 2x4 or 4x4 (front to back) to increase air flow.

I have a refrigerator is my garage also, and was having similar issues until I raised my unit up, which also helped with keeping the condenser grill clean.

Jul 14, 2011 | Frigidaire Freezers

1 Answer

Air conditioning not too cold ??


Hello,
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Let me explain in layman's terms how the air conditioning (AC) system works and what could be happening to your car.

Like your body, the air conditioning compressor is the heart of the AC system, and Freon is the blood. The compressor pumps Freon throughout the AC system, either the older type R12 which costs as much as gold it seems these days, or the new environmentally-friendly R134A Freon. This Freon is a gas and liquid combination that is compressed and circulated throughout the air conditioning system. The compressed Freon is pushed through the system under pressure and is passed through different sized metal and rubber hoses and a special valve called an expansion valve that cause the gas to expand and contract.

This expansion and contraction makes the Freon gas very cold. This cold gas makes its way via metal lines into the dash area of your vehicle to the evaporator core. This evaporator core is like a small radiator, except it has cold Freon circulating inside and not hot antifreeze. A small fan (the AC blower fan which you control from the control panel on the dash) sits in front of the evaporator core and blows air across this cold evaporator and then through the vents inside your vehicle.

The other objective of the air conditioning system is to remove the heat from inside the cab of the vehicle. This heat is removed by the Freon with the help of the AC condenser located at the front of the car (usually in front of the radiator). The Freon coming back from the evaporator carries the heat from the cab to the condenser via rubber and metal hoses. Just like your radiator, the condenser is lightweight aluminum with many internal winding coils.
The Freon travels through these coils, and in between these coils are small slits or fins that the Freon is forced through. The condenser will have an electric cooling fan mounted in front or behind it to push or pull air through these fins to remove the heat from the Freon. Some vehicles still use the old fashioned fan blade driven by the engine to pull air across the radiator and the condenser.
Now I know that is just a tidbit of information on how the air conditioning system works, and it is very general, but I wanted you to know what to look for to give you insight as to what might be happening with your vehicle.
A few causes of low cooling efficiency or no cooling at all at idle are:

Lack of air flow across the condenser. Make sure the electric cooling fan motor near the condenser is coming on, or in models that are equipped with a fan blade make sure this fan is turning and is turning very fast.

Low Freon levels. Freon level and pressure should be checked by your certified air conditioning mechanic.

Overheating. If the engine is running hot or overheating, it can have a noticeable negative affect on the air conditioning system. Some cars have two electric cooling fans, one for the air conditioning condenser and the other for the radiator. Make sure they are both working properly. Usually at idle on a hot day with the AC on both fans will be on.

When the vehicle is traveling at freeway speeds, the compressor is pumping the Freon throughout the system much faster and harder than at idle. There is a dramatic increase in air flow across the condenser due to 55 mph winds, and the engine is usually operating at a cooler, more efficient temperature as well, thus allowing the air conditioning system to operate efficiently.
Note: An air conditioning system that is somewhat low on Freon can still feel comfortable at freeway speeds due to the added air flow across the condenser which can overcome the ill effects of slightly low Freon. Periodic air conditioning performance checks by your mechanic are the best way to keep the system in great shape.

Hope this helps.

Goodluck

Oct 08, 2010 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Cool air but not cold


Check compressor. You must be able to hold your hand on it without getting burned if it is too hot then the condenser stopped up
which affects freon flow
I would condemm it if thats the case.
Check Condensor air flow and temp out back.
Both coils may need cleaning.

If this was helpful please rate me.
Leo Ponder Appliance-Tyler,Texas
imufo2@sbcglobal.net

Aug 07, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

The compressor suddenly trip off and it runs and after few minutes it trip off again


Compressor tipping is typically due to overheating. A single bimetal disc thermostat (e.g. Klixon brand device) in located within the motor windings within hermetically sealed compressors which will cut off motor current after the local windings have sufficiently overheated.

Unfortunately, by the time this limiter has activated, the compressor motor and pump has typically already suffered mild to major damage.

Compressor overheating is typically a result of low freon. The freon, besides cooling the compressor, also carries the lubricant, so low freon results in a hot compressor with poor lubrication, with some degree of permanent damage by the time the internal limiter has activated.

There are a few other possibilities, depending on system design, but some version of the above scenario is typical.

When the compressor runs hot, this also initiates chemical changes in the freon and oil resulting in acids with further attack both the compressor pump, motor windings and motor bearings, a viscous circle.

Compressor overheating can also be a result of contaminants circulating within the freon or evolving mechanical failure problems within the compressor pump or motor.

Better systems (very few high end residential central AC systems) include OEM or field installed high freon pressure and low freon pressure cut out switches connected to circuits which stop the compressor and keep it off when pressure are well beyond desired.
These are far more effective in protecting the compressor and preventing permanent damage.

Additional protection options are a compressor discharge temperature limit switch (shuts off the compressor if the outlet freon goes well above desirable outlet temps), and a flow switch which sense adequate condenser fan air flow and only allows the compressor to run when adequate air flow is present (a second or so after the condenser fan has started). (Since condenser air flow is what removes all the system and interior heat, the compressor should not run unless airflow is appropriate.)

While all the above 4 safety device strategies are relatively inexpensive, they are not present in the vast majority of residential AC systems sold in the US.

Jan 06, 2010 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

4 Answers

A/C Cold while driving, gets warms at stop light?


It causes the discharge pressure to rise very rapidly because it's not being cooled to condense the hot freon when it flows through the coil. By the time the hot freon comes back around to the oraface, it's already in it's gas form and there is no evaporation process or expansion. In essence it causes the system to run at it's least efficiency. Hope this answers your question, good luck!

Sep 02, 2009 | 1993 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

2 Answers

2004 SATURN VUE HAS PROBLEM BLOWING COLD AIR WHEN SITTING IDLE. IT WILL COOL IF I AM DRIVING AND GIVING IT GAS CONTINUOUSLY. FREON OK. CHECKED OUT BY MECHANIC WHO REPLACED THE "EXPANSION VALVE". STILL...


did you check if the cooling fans are working? this is very important, because they lower the pressure of the freon before passing throughout the expansion valve and getting into the evaporator,more pressure means highter temperature, , of course when you are driving the air flow throughout out the condenser lowering the freon temperature in the condenser and lowering the freon pressure at the high side, tha's way the temperature inside the car is lower ... you can have a similar problem if the condenser is partially plugged..hope this was very helpful...

Aug 05, 2009 | Saturn Vue Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The front A/C blows cold but the back A/C is not. the condenser is not even getting cold


The rear ac has an orifice tube. This restricts the flow of freon.if orifice tube is blown through or the little screen is plugged with compressor debris it will not work correctly. Some ac systems use a expansion valve same purpose but the little valve can get stuck open and just allow freon to flow through.

Jul 23, 2009 | 1997 GMC Safari

1 Answer

Vacuum condenser is flashing


this means your condensor on the back of the unit that pumps the freon needs to be vacuumed. It may be dusty or not getting air flow to cool it off. Also vacuum all your coils on back of unit

Jul 11, 2009 | Sub-Zero 650 / O Bottom Freezer...

1 Answer

Amana window air conditioner unit keeps freezing.


There are 2 causes for freezing. Lack of air flow or shortage of Freon. After defrosting, start the machine and look for an even pattern of water condensing on all the coils. If the cooling is even and complete on all the coils, see if the coil is so dirty that it restricts the air flow. The fan blade can build up dirt and need to be cleaned, too. If the cooling (condensation) is not complete, you have a Freon problem. Some of it could have leaked out or the metering tubes could be partially pllugged up (on the inside of them).

Jul 22, 2008 | Amana Heating & Cooling

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