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Can I record a track from the CD to a tape (within the Tachnics)

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The technics system wont allow you to record from cd to tape

Posted on May 24, 2011

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How to tune a vcr


I assume you are talking about the tracking control. Older VCRs had a control that allowed you to make adjustments within a narrow range by turning a knob and newer machines have auto-tracking. The adjustment allows very limited adjustment of electronic centering of the read heads over the recorded video track on the tape. The mechanical and electronic alignment of tape head tracking is a precision process that requires specialized alignment tools and a "standard" pre-recorded test tape. These tapes are very expensive and not as precise as one would hope. In addition, like all magnetic tapes, they stretch and must be replaced. The theory is that if multiple VCRs are aligned on the these standard alignment tapes, all machines will then track and reproduce material alike. Unfortunately, there are so many standard tapes in the world with so much variation that things do not always work well. If you cannot get your machine to play a tape recorded on another machine to track correctly, you could take it to a repair man and have him align it, but it is no guarantee it will track all the time on all tapes. That is why the world has moved on to digital recording.

Jan 11, 2015 | Televison & Video

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How a VCR and Videotape Work and the Most Common Problems


A common complaint about videotape is that over time, playback becomes unstable and often deteriorates to the point that the tape becomes unplayable or that the tape works on one VCR, but not another. All of these problems can be traced to tape path alignment in the VCR and damage to the tape itself. I will address each issue separately.
First you need to understand a little about the tape media. When you record on VHS videotape, the recorder lays down three (four for stereo sound) magnetic tracks on the ½ inch wide tape. Analog audio is recorded along the top edge as a thin horizontal stripe (or parallel stripes for stereo) for the entire length of the recording. In the center of the tape, video is recorded as diagonal parallel stripes by two or four heads that rotate on a drum at 360 RPM. On the bottom edge (the most vulnerable place for damage to occur) there is another horizontal track that is critical to playback. It is the sync track and it's purpose is provide the VCR with the feedback it requires to maintain the tape speed within extremely tight parameters. If the tape does not move at a precise speed, the picture and sound can become unstable to the point that it will be unusable.
As you record, a fixed frequency sine wave is recorded on the sync track. If during recording, the tape speed increases or decreases, it will be reflected on the sync track. During playback, the VCR's circuitry senses the small millisecond-to-millisecond speed fluctuations of the tape movement over the heads and adjusts the speed so the tape speed always matches the speed at which it was recorded. If the sync track is ever damaged, your tape can become useless.
Unfortunately, videotape is a very delicate media. It is easily damaged and once damaged, it usually cannot be repaired. The most common failure is due to tape stretch. Videotape is not very elastic. Anything more then slight tension during use can stretch the tape to the point that it cannot rebound. If the sync track is stretched, the recorded frequency will change and the VCR will react accordingly by making incorrect speed corrections resulting in picture and sound disruptions. Your recorder has tensioning arms that control tape tension as it moves through the system. If the tension in the tape path is incorrectly adjusted, the tape will be damaged as it is recorded or played.
Improper storage is the other common cause of edge damage. If you lay your cassettes flat for prolonged periods, the weight of the tape above will press against the sync track and can damage it. Always store your tapes vertically. Extremes in temperature and humidity can cause stretch. Store tapes in a cool dry place. Also, periodically restack your tapes. To restack a tape, put it in your recorder and fast-forward it to the end and back to the beginning. That will redistribute the tension on the tape. After playing a tape, always restack it once or twice. I have a large collection; over 1,000 tapes. I cannot restack them all on a regular basis. But when I play them, I take that as an opportunity to restack them.
Now that you understand some basics about the media, I will now turn you attention to your VCR. As I hope you are starting to understand, proper playback requires precise alignment of many moving elements. The two broad categories are tape path alignment and head alignment. None of this is a do it yourself job. In addition to specialized electronic test equipment, VCR alignment requires specialized tools along with expensive custom made for the brand and model alignment jigs along with (again expensive) alignment tapes. The alignment tape is important beyond the obvious. In order for a tape recorded on one machine to play properly on another, the two machines must have matching alignment. VCR manufacturers record their own alignment tapes using precisely and frequently aligned recorders. The tapes are used to align a specified number of VCRs and then discarded because each time a tape is used it wares. Since there is a uniform standard for these tapes, a tape recorded on one brand of VCR should play on another. That is the theory.
Now for the real world; the consistent interchangeability we all wish for is hard to maintain. Consider this. The tolerances that must be maintained at every point in all of the processes relative to VCRs and tapes are very close to what is possible; little room for slight variations. Since the tolerance for one part of the process may accumulate with another part of the process either mathematically positively or negatively, it is often the case that each individual part of the chain is within tolerance, but the sum total is out of tolerance.
What in plane language does this all mean? Two alignment tapes made on the same machine will be different. Tapes from different manufactures will be different. The tape you local technician or factory service center uses will have inconsistencies. The net effect is that two seemingly properly aligned machines may not be able to properly play each other's tapes.
I do not mean to suggest that you should not have your VCR properly aligned and maintained by a professional. My point is that videotape is an old technology with flaws that could not fully be overcome in the time frame that it would have been profitable for manufacturers to do so. That is why we have moved on to digital technologies. My advice is to enjoy your videotapes while you can. They will not last forever. If you have important tapes, transfer them to digital media to protect your memories as soon as possible.

on Jul 03, 2015 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Recorded album and first track is cut at beginning everytime


you are going from a record(vinyl) to what before you are doing the ipod? a cd or a tape..when recording the tape..remember theres 30 seconds of plastic leader on those reels..need to forward the tape past that leader to the actual tape before the recording begins..the only other thing is that some recordings that are protected will automatically screw up your recording so as to stop copyright infringement..it may be sending a purposely blank signal for a brief period..and thats encoded into the original recording..

Mar 15, 2014 | Sony Sound Forge Audio Studio 9

1 Answer

How to burn a Cd


The Sony MHC-BX2 can record from a CD to a cassette tape. This model doesn't have a CD burner. The manual for the MHC-BX2 is available from Sony support: http://esupport.sony.com/US/p/model-home.pl?mdl=MHCBX2&template_id=1&region_id=1&tab=manuals#/manualsTab . See page 12 of the PDF.

If your unit is a different model, please post a comment with that model number. I wish that I had better news for you.

Cindy Wells
(on those shelf systems that can burn a CD, place a blank CD-R or CD-RW (if supported) in the disc tray. Use the function button to set the recording source (Phono with the Croseley units). Place the tape to record in the tape deck and press play reach a point a bit before the desired point to start the recording. (Some also will record from the radio, turntable, or other device. Again start the source playing.) Then press CD Record. Press Stop when you want the recording to stop or when one side of the tape/LP is finished. (Some have a Split Track button if you want to identify every track. Press this during the silent period between songs.) Otherwise, you will get one track per side with tapes/LPs.)

Jul 10, 2012 | Sony Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How can i select auto pause on my player model je510 thanks


Inserting blank spaces while recording to tape (Auto Space)
The Auto Space Function inserts a 3-second blank space between each track while recording from MDs to tapes, allowing you to use the AMS function during later playback.
Press A.SPACE repeatedly until “A.SPACE” appears in
the display.
To cancel Auto Space
Press A.SPACE repeatedly until “A.SPACE” disappears.
Note
If the Auto Space Function is on while recording a selection containing multiple track numbers, (for example, a medley or symphony), blank spaces will be inserted within the selection whenever the track number changes.

See Page 21 of your User Manual

May 23, 2010 | Sony MDS-JE480 Mini Disc Player

1 Answer

Fostex e 16 tape warping


I can't speak to the specifics of the machine's mechanics but I have been into audio (hobby) and and a Service Engineer on data tape storage (from 7- and 9-track 1/2" open reel running at 200 inches per second and capable of start/stopping in .6" to 100-plus track 1/2" digital data cartridge tape) for over 32 years so I know a few things about tape media handling.

Squeezing 16 audio tracks into 1/2" of media doesn't leave much room for error in the analog world. The manual I found at retrevo.com discusses making electrical Play and Record level adjustments using a calibrated Magnetic Reference Tape BUT they don't discuss head azimuth setting or adjustment which could affect high frequency response and crosstalk between adjacent channels.

You could check for audible crosstalk by recording alternate (even or odd) tracks at a fairly high level and then playing back only the others. The crosstalk spec is only 50dB at 1kHz so you can't expect total silence but it should be on par with the residual noise of the tape without Noise Reduction engaged and should be fairly uniform across the tape.

Physical deformation of the tape will also plague any machine with narrow tracks. If the edges flutter you are definitely losing amplitude on the outer tracks. The tape itself could also be experiencing stresses due to uneven rewind tension that would result in an uneven 'pack' within the reel. If the appearance of the tape within the reel flanges after play or rewind is NOT uniform there may be a physical reasons for it. If any of the tape wrap is exposing edges of the tape you have to be extra careful to handle the reel without compressing the flanges. A perfectly wound tape would have a uniform wrap appearance and when viewed on edge there would be clearance between the tape and both flanges. Any contact with the flanges will wear or deform that edge of the tape.

If the reel flange is warped sufficiently it will contact the tape every revolution, too, and during high speed transport you'll see and hear it.

Physical Tracking within the tape path must be perfect. With a high powered lamp and no tape loaded examine the heads. There should be no visibly worn grooves in their surfaces that would alter the way the tape passes over them. Then load a new blank tape and view how the tape passes over the heads, looking for any deviation from perfect flat alignment within the tape path. It may help to place a piece of white paper behind the area so you can see the reflection of the light off the tape. Any variation indicates less-than-perfect tape-to-head contact which would result in loss of treble, crosstalk or dropouts. Repeat this with a previously recorded tape. If it's different then we need to suspect machine-induced tape problems.

Proper tensioning of the tape during both play and rewind is key as you mentioned.

Head wear is also a possibility.

One thing that many people overlook is the storage of their media to ensure longevity. A reasonably constant temperature and humidity is essential as is sufficient distance from magnetic fields. Though not very convenient, storing any tape (open reel, audio cassette, video) in a 'played' state produces the most uniform tensions and pack wrap so it's the best way to avoid problems that varying temperature might cause.

If you can identify or eliminate any of these problems and add that information to this post I'm sure someone out there might be able to assist with the next steps.

Apr 22, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Converting Audio Cassettes to CDs


First off I assume you have the manual for you're 5700. if not a PDF copy is here
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/media/i3d/01/A/man-migrate/MANUAL000027911.pdf

Assuming you have a standalone tape deck that has phono inputs and outputs connection and recording recording should be easily achieved.
Forget the coaxial unless of course your tape deck has digital outputs.
Assuming it hasn't just connect the two output sockets from the tape dec which may be labelled REC out left and REC out right to the Line in (L) and Line (R) of the CD recorder.
The physical setup is now complete.
The increment level they refer to in the manual offers you a choice of 3 final decibel output levels in other words how loud it will be when it is finally recorded onto the disc.

the last paragraph on page 16 is relevant to the setup described above.

Page 15 of your manual is all you need to achieve tape transfer to CD.
follow the steps below and choose ANALOG the source to be played is your tape deck so once the process has begun press the play button on your tape deck and you should get a decent recording. Leave everything else at their default settings until you get a better understanding of how to tweak your recordings.
Personally I transfer audio tapes directly to my PC and Audio edit them until they are perfect but I've been doing this for years.

Good luck


here's a snippet

To record from an external source:
1. Turn power ON.
2. Place a recordable audio disc (CD-R or CD-RW) label side up
in TRAY II.
3. Close TRAY II. (When a blank disc is placed in TRAY II, the display
will show BLANK.)
4. Press INPUT until the source you want to record is selected.
DIGITAL OPTICAL:
record a source connected to the DIGITAL IN (OPTICAL) terminal.
DIGITAL COAXIAL:
record a source connected to the DIGITAL IN (COAXIAL) terminal.
ANALOG:
record a source connected to the analog LINE IN jacks.
5. Select the desired mode of track division (track number
assignment) by pressing the MANUAL/AUTO button (see the
ADVANCED RECORDING section for more information).
6. Press the RECORD button.
The unit enters record pause mode.
The PAUSE [ ] icon and REC blink on the display.
7. Press the PLAY (ENTER) [ ] button of TRAY II to start recording.
8. Play the source to be recorded.
• During digital recording, if the input signal stops for 5 seconds,
recording will stop.
• During analog recording, if the input signal stops for 20 seconds,
recording will stop.
• If the unit detects copy-prohibit signals during recording,
CAN’T COPY appears on the display and recording is stopped.
To stop recording: Press the STOP [] button
To temporarily pause recording: Press the PAUSE [ ] button.
Remember that every time recording is paused or stopped,
a new track number will be assigned.

Jan 11, 2009 | TDK DA-5700 CD Player

3 Answers

Recording Speed


the tascam 414 is a 4 track recording studio which uses standard cassette tapes- meaning they only play in one direction, because the tape is full. The 414 records at double speed so that recording fidelity is increased. When you have made a recording you want to mix you then dub your recording though the outputs into another standard tape recorder or whatever you have available, be it a cd recorder or your PC. So, when you listened to your recording on a standard tape player, you were not only hearing it at half speed but you were only listening to 2 of the 4 tracks. The other tracks would only be heard if you flipped the tape over, and they would be heard running backward. I would have though the 414 had a swich to allow it to also record at standard speed to but I guest it does not.

Jan 10, 2009 | Tascam Starter Pack for 4-Track Cassette...

1 Answer

Need user manual


I have the CDR-200 and did not have the manual either. However, I did discover the same problem and found the solution. There is a "confirm" button on the front of the unit under the display area. After you press the record button "Record" will begin to flash in the display area and then you press "Confirm". It should start recording. Note however the following:

BURNING FROM EXTERNAL CASSETTE OR PHONO
Before starting this procedure make sure you have an AUDIO recording CD in the RECORDER tray of the CDR-200. A regular CD-R type of disc for computers is not going to work and may cause an annoying message on the display which does not go away until you put the right type of recording CD in the unit. It must be either an AUDIO CD-R or an AUDIO CD/RW.

1. When copying from an external cassette deck, you should set the source (press source button) until the setting is "Analog".

2. The "Dual" button should not be in effect. In the lower right portion of the screen you should only see a small number "1" with a circle around it. This indicates the CDs currently being used by the burner. In "dual" mode you can copy from the Playback CD of the CDR-200 to the Recorder CD. In dual mode you see "1" and "2" with circles around them. The active CD tray will flash on the display.

3. When copying from an external cassette unit, you use the "Record" button to start the recording. At the end of the cassette track you MUST press the STOP button by the CD Recorder tray. After you press STOP the unit will say "Update" which indicates it is closing out the track on the CD-R. You can continue to write tracks by pressing RECORD again, then CONFIRM when the tape is positioned at the right PLAYBACK track. It is usually helpful to have a few seconds of blank tape at the start of the PLAYBACK track before pressing RECORD. Press play on the cassette deck, then RECORD followed by CONFIRM on the CD burner.

4. When the track has finished burning you must press STOP to close the track on the CD-R. After you press STOP, the unit will display "Update" to indicate it is updating or closing the track. When the process completes, the unit will display the tracks it has written to the CD-R and will be ready for you to copy another track or FINALIZE the CD-R. When the unit is waiting after the STOP, you can change the cassette tape, reposition to a playback track and ready the playback tape for more recording. When the PLAYBACK tape is ready repeat STEP 3. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until you have about 14 or 15 tracks on the CD-R.

5. When you have finished recording about 14 or 15 tracks onto the CD-R, you will want to finalize the CD-R. Press the FINALIZE button, and then press the CONFIRM button. You will see the the unit start to display the progress of the finalize by advancing the level meters of the left and right channels in the display. When the unit is finished finalizing it will return to the number of tracks display for the CD-R. After finalizing the CD-R you can play it back to make sure the burn was successful. Be sure to wait for the tracks display before removing or playing the CD-R after the finalize is done. Removing before the finalize is done may damage the unit and may render the CD-R bad.

BURNING FROM THE PLAYBACK CD
Before starting this procedure make sure you have an AUDIO recording CD in the RECORDER tray of the CDR-200. A regular CD-R type of disc for computers is not going to work and may cause an annoying message on the display which does not go away until you put the right type of recording CD in the unit. It must be either an AUDIO CD-R or an AUDIO CD/RW.

1. Set the unit to "Dual" mode. As described above, you will see "1" and "2" with small circles in the lower right portion of the display.

2. Make sure the "Source" mode is set to "Analog" by repeatedly pressing the SOURCE button until it shows "Analog".
3. When copying from the PLAYBACK CD tray you will not use the RECORD button by the CD Burner tray. You will use the 'DUB" button just to the right of the display.

4. Put an audio CD in the PLAYBACK CD tray and press the skip track button ">>" until you arrive at the track you wish to record from. If the track you want to start at is track 1, then you don't need to skip tracks.

5. When positioned at the correct playback track, press the DUB button. The unit will show "CDR" and then "DUB" on the display. When it says "DUB" press the CONFIRM button. The unit will start recording. You can adjust the record level during the first few seconds to make sure you don't have the recording volume level set too high.

6. When the track is finished, you should see the unit indicate on the display "Update". This indicates it is closing the track and it should do this automatically. If it does not do this you may have to press STOP near the RECORDER Tray to force closing of the track. Usually the unit indicates "AUTO" in the display area and I believe that is what controls the automatic track numbering feature. I am not sure how the AUTO feature is turned on. I noticed on the CDR-200 it is on by default.

7. After the UPDATE is complete, the unit will display the number of tracks it has written to the CD-R. You can at this point change the PLAYBACK CD to another one or advance to another track for continued recording. When at the correct track simply go back to step 5 and continue.

8. When you are all done copying tracks from one or more CDs, and you wish to finalize the CD press FINALIZE and then press CONFIRM to start the finalize process. I noticed on the CDR-200 if you wait too long after recording a track the unit may start the finalize process automatically. This happened after at least 5 minutes. It is best to try and stay with the copy process to monitor what is happening. The finalize can also start if you have written to many tracks to the CD-R and it runs out of space. Typically, your safe if you burn about 14 to 15 tracks to a CD-R at a time. You might be able to fit more if the tracks are very short (2-3 minutes each).

One last note about the connections on the back of the unit. Read the labels of the connections on the back very carefully. The CDR-200 and probably the 201 have separate outputs for the PLAYBACK CD (CD) and BURNER CD (CDR). You will want to connect these to seperate inputs on your audio amplifier. Or you might also wish to merge them using adapters into one input on your audio amplifier. If you keep them separate you will need to change sources on the audio amplifier to hear each tray. For example, you might need to switch to "CD/TAPE" for the CD, and "AUX" for the CDR. It is probably easier to merge the two using audio adapters which can be readily obtained from RadioShack.

I hope this helps!

May 08, 2008 | Classic Electronics CDR201 CD Recorder

2 Answers

Uploading audio instumentals into the Tascam 2488 II


You can get to the quick start guide here.

www.tascamgiga.com/i-738-232-128-0-BBDFF677.pdf

There is quite a bit to learn to get to the proficient point with this unit. Most of it involves the operator learning the software

Feb 11, 2008 | Tascam 2488 Portastudio Multitrack...

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