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My telephone connector is downstairs, and I want to have my PC upstairs - but I do not want to run wires around the house. Is there any way I can connect my computer wirelessly. i.e router downstairs, computer upstairs?

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Yes, a wireless router should work fine.
You'll need a wireless-adapter (either internal PCI add-in card, or external USB stick) in your computer, if it does not have built-in wireless capability.

Posted on May 22, 2011

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Internet has become ridiculously slow over wifi


Unfortunately so many things can interfere with wireless technology - Microwaves, Electricity Cords, Computers, Etc. Unfortunately wireless also struggles to travel through floors and certain types of walls etc.

It may be the floor, combined with the distance from the router, as well as the electrostatic field that the electricity wiring in your house may start up.

Best thing to do would be to wire up an extender upstairs and you should be out to extend your wireless signal, and get a good download speed.

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I have netgear wgr614 upstairs my laptop downstairs loads pages VERY slowly what can I do


Verify that it is indeed a wifi signal problem by moving the laptop upstairs temporarily.

If this fixes the problem, you're getting poor wifi signal downstairs. Not much you can do with the elements at hand. So try adding another element: install a wifi signal repeater (around US$ 25) somewhere in the middle. Or you can run a cable (or use Powerline Ethernet - around US$ 100) to downstairs, and there install a wifi access point (US$ 30-60). Or directly connect the laptop to the newly installed network wire.

If the problem isn't fixed, you have some other problem on the laptop: most likely a faulty network configuration. Verify against whatever PC you have upstairs; they should have identical configurations except their IP address (if fixed instead of DHCP).

Just to be on the safe side verify the laptop is properly operating and immune from virus and malware. Not all slowdowns are the system's fault.

Happy navigation!

Jan 03, 2010 | NetGear WGR614 Wireless Router

1 Answer

Hi, I have a digital tv plugged into an extension cable in an upstairs (Toshiba) bedroom; it works perfectly - receiving all channels. I have a digital tv downstairs (Samsung) where it seems the wall...


Hi Fiona
Somewhere along the line from the aerial there must be a signal splitter that feeds the upstair and downstair terminals.
Try to find that splitter and switch the output to see if the problem goes from up to downstair.
If it does switch then you know the problem is with the splitter block, and if it stays the same then the problem is with the cable and/or the connectors that run downstairs.
Also the reason you get a pixellated(snowy) picture is because of signal loss during the length of the cable you ran downstair.
If running a cable downstair becomes the best option to fix your problem , then you could buy a cheap 10db signal booster/r.f amplifier to correct the signal loss and a cable splitter to feed both tv`s
That booster would be installed upstair in your case(near the source of the signal to be amplified).
I could send you a small diagram if need be. Hope this will help and Merry Chrismas

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1 Answer

Trying to connect a wired network wirelessly to a router


No. You'll need to run a "cross-over" Ethernet cable from one of the "LAN" ports on the "downstairs" router, connecting to the "WAN" port on another router that you will need to buy, and place "upstairs", and connect the 4 devices to the 4 "LAN" ports.

Or, run a long "straight-through" Ethernet cable from your DSL-modem (or cable-modem) that is "downstairs", and move your wireless router "upstairs", and connect the 4 devices to the router's "LAN" ports.
Your laptop "downstairs" should still be able to connect (wirelessly) to the wireless-router that is "upstairs".

Sep 16, 2009 | Gateway Belkin 54g Wireless DSL/Cable...

1 Answer

Weak signal 60 feet away at neigbhoor's


Some routers just don't put out strong signals. The problems could be wiring in/around/at your house or neighbors....causing weak signal. Are the signal strengths strong in your house?

We have super signal strength on ours upstairs (we have a bi-level house) but downstairs the signal is very low. All the wiring in the house and anything electronic or otherwise can block it.

Hope this helps at least some. Good luck!

Jul 30, 2009 | D-Link DIR-625 (790069292637) Wireless...

1 Answer

Heating blowing coo air downstairs and warm upstairs?


Some of this depends on where the air handler/furnace is located. Most often in two story houses, it's in the attic upstairs, or in a closet upstairs. A duct routes air from the furnace to the downstairs supply duct, so it is a distance from the air handler.
When the unit first initiates a heating cycle, that duct is going to be full of cool air, and the duct itself will be cool. So the furnace has to run long enough to push the cool air out, as well as warm the duct up, before your going to feel warm air at the registers downstairs.

Keep in mind, heat rises. And, your thermostat only monitors the immediate area where it's located. In your case, upstairs.
Two story houses are problematic because of this. And one way around it is to have a damper system installed that distributes the air upstairs or downstairs based on a thermostat located in those spaces. There would be 2 dampers, and 2 thermostats (one upstairs, one downstairs). Each stat would control a damper, and the call for heat or cooling.

Let me know if you would like to consider a system like this, and I can point you to components to use. I've put several system like this in.

Jan 26, 2009 | Kitchen Appliances - Others

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Problem connecting to my network


What I would do is replace the wireless router with a 4 or 5 port switch to control computers (devices) downstairs. Or, if you need wireless access, purchase only an access point to cover downstairs.

This way the wire from upstairs goes directly into the access point and you have wireless access downstairs.

And yet another way would be to purchase Airlink 101 PowerEthernet boxes ($54.99 each) and use those to connect an access point anywhere in your home that has an outlet.

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Slow connection


Your slow connection could be affected by poor location wireless router (therefore poor signal strength), electrical interference, or even someone else with a wireless router transmitting on the same channel as your wireless router.
Try relocating your router away from solid walls, and/or move your computer or router to another location.
If your connection speed varies, could be electrical interference with appliance/s in your house, turn off all appliances, test your internet speed connecting then turn on one appliance at a time to determine which appliance is at fault (could have a faulty capacitor in the appliance)

Jul 24, 2008 | NetGear MR814 Wireless Router

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