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When router is plugged into the system the other computer on the home network can not read the signal

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Posted on Aug 15, 2008

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How to turn on bluetooth radio


Which operating system ???...
There are a variety of ways to connect to the Internet or a home/business network using your Hewlett-Packard (HP) desktop computer---via a modem, Ethernet cable and even wirelessly.
A wireless connection works by sending a signal from your modem or router to your HP desktop's built-in wireless radio.
The radio receives and processes the signal so you can access the Internet or a home or business network.
In order for the signal to be received by your HP desktop, you must enable the wireless radio within the computer's configuration.

Click "Start," "Control Panel."
Double-click on the "HP Wireless Assistant" icon.
The HP Wireless Assistant dialog box will open.
Click the "Turn On" button next to the words "Wireless LAN."
Click "Close" to activate the wireless radio.
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&docname=c00045315&product=12455 - DeviceEnabled
Using Bluetooth Devices (Windows XP)

http://h20239.www2.hp.com/techcenter/wireless/wireless_TS.htm
Wireless networking center

Aug 30, 2013 | Packard Bell PC Desktops

Tip

Boost wi-fi signals!!!


It is true that a direct cabled connection is probably faster, but that doesn't mean you can't get great Internet connection speeds from a WiFi connection. WiFi is a signal, so it's simply a matter of boosting that signal to extend as far as you need it to, and doing it in a way so you'll still get the same amount of power. There are ways to extend your WiFi signal, and most of them won't cost a penny. Here are my ten ways to boost your wifi signal:
  1. Position The Router - Yes, where you place your router does matter. If your wireless desktop or laptop is in another room, the signal has to go through walls and other interference before it reaches you. You can change the positioning and give everyone equal access. For example, in an open office room setting, instead of placing the router in a corner, try putting it in the middle of the room. It might give better coverage to the entire office. The signal should extend out more evenly. If you're looking for optimal wireless coverage in various parts of your home, position the router in the middle of the house. Moving it up off the floor, to a bookcase or shelf, should also help. If you only have one wireless computer, and it's always in the same place (ie: your office, the kitchen, or the hammock) then it makes more sense to place the router closer to the computer, rather than in the center of the house. But experiment -- I've heard of cases where there was a very weak signal, and the problem was that the router was TOO close to the computer.

  2. Avoid Bad Neighbors - Remember, wifi is a radio signal, so the signals from microwave ovens, cordless phones and even your neighbor's wireless router may interfere. So try to steer clear of those as well.

  3. Extend the Antenna - There are some decent booster antennas out there that you can purchase in addition to your current router to help the signal extend out further. You just plug them directly into the router base and it can give you that boost in the signal that you need. Hawking makes several types of wireless antenna boosters.

  4. Repeaters - This little gizmo just takes in the wireless signal, boosts it up to full strength, and spits it back out again. Place the repeater within range of the router, and near the computer that needs a wireless signal. Linksys and D-link offer wireless repeaters, also called range extenders. If you have an Apple computer, look into the Airport Express as a signal repeater.

  5. Gettin' Geeky - Some DIY geeks have come up with interesting ways to extend or boost your Wi Fi signal. One example is the Pringle Cantenna method. This may seem like a hoax, but the technique appeared in an O'Reilly book titled Building Wireless Community Networks, Nov. 2001. Other techniques, such as the satellite dish using a cellphone are elaborate hoaxes, and I'll admit I fell for this one before a kind reader set me straight.

  6. Upgrade Your Router - If you've owned the same router for several years, it might be good to go pick up a new one if you want to expand your connection. Some of the latest models have a stronger signal. The newer 802.11n routers generally have a stronger broadcast signal, and they'll work even if you have an 802.11B or G adapter in your computer.

  7. Upgrade Your Software - One of the most basic things you can do is to make sure your router software is up to date. To do this, visit the website of the maker of your router, whether it is Linksys, D-Link, or some other brand. Check for your model number and make any updates necessary.

  8. Tweak Your Settings - Your software has special features that you may or may not want. Make sure you read the manual that comes with your router and tweak it to fit your needs. Most modern ones are "just plug it in" though there might be ways to boost signals or to make sure it is sending out signals that are optimized for your computer's wireless adapter. For example, most routers are set to broadcast on channel 6. Try switching the channel to 1 or 11 and see if it makes a difference.

  9. Is Your Wireless Router Secured? - Make sure your neighbor isn't hogging all the juice from YOUR wireless router. Get your network secured only you are using the signal. Tap into your security features and make sure you use secure passwords. See wireless security for help with this.

  10. Find Alternative Firmware - While your router's original software (aka firmware) should be all you need, some routers do not output the signal at the maximum possible strength. You might want to check into alternative firmware, like OpenWRT. But be careful with firmware updates -- if you load the wrong code for your router, you can foul it up with no recourse.

on Jul 20, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

My wireless network connection (Realtek RTL8188CU Wireless LAN)(dd-wrt-688), the signal is not stable, how can i make it stable, since my router is working in my other computer.


Stability could be caused by other electro magnetic signals in your home or office such as cordless phones, microwaves, security systems or other wireless devices that operate within the same frequency. try turning off any of these devices and see if your wireless quality improves.

Aug 30, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How do i connect a netgear wireless router to comcast modem


Unplug your Comcast modem from your electrical outlet. Connect the Ethernet cord from the back of your Comcast modem into the Ethernet port labeled "Internet" on your new router. Connect an available Ethernet port from the back of the new router to the Ethernet port on the back of your computer.


Plug your cable modem into an electrical outlet. Plug your new router in an electrical outlet.


Reboot your computer. Click on "Start," then "Control panel." Click "Network and sharing." Select "Set up a new home network."

Click on the option for a router or cable modem when prompted by Windows to select your hardware. Your computer will attempt to access your new router. When the brand name for your router is listed, double-click it so your computer can configure itself to the new router.


Create a new name for your home network and create a unique password to prevent unauthorized users on your network. Your computer may reset your Comcast modem and router so your new changes can take effect.

Nov 04, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Can the HP Pavilion 763n PC Desktop use a wireless router?


Your computer has a "built-in" 10/100BT network connection integrated on the motherboard but to go wireless you'll have to add either a PCI (internal) or USB (external) wireless network adapter to transmit/receive the signal from your wireless router. Think "walkie-talkie" here with the wireless router installed AFTER the modem (phone line outlet needed) located in a central area of your home and transmitting/receiving to the individual wireless network adapters that must be separately installed in each computer.

Oct 19, 2010 | HP Pavilion 763n PC Desktop

1 Answer

How to connect wireless router, Netgear WGR614, to my computer?


4 steps to set up your home wireless network
1.
Choose your wireless equipment
The first step is to make sure that you have the equipment you need. As you're looking for products in stores or on the Internet, you might notice that you can choose equipment that supports three different wireless networking technologies: 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g. We recommend 802.11g, because it offers excellent performance and is compatible with almost everything.
Shopping list
• Broadband Internet connection
• Wireless router
• A computer with built-in wireless networking support or a wireless network adapter

A wireless router
The router converts the signals coming across your Internet connection into a wireless broadcast, sort of like a cordless phone base station. Be sure to get a wireless router, and not a wireless access point.
A wireless network adapter
Network adapters wirelessly connect your computer to your wireless router. If you have a newer computer you may already have wireless capabilities built in. If this is the case, then you will not need a wireless network adapter. If you need to purchase an adapter for a desktop computer, buy a USB wireless network adapter. If you have a laptop, buy a PC card-based network adapter. Make sure that you have one adapter for every computer on your network.
Note: To make setup easy, choose a network adapter made by the same vendor that made your wireless router. For example, if you find a good price on a Linksys router, choose a Linksys network adapter to go with it. To make shopping even easier, buy a bundle, such as those available from D-Link, Netgear, Linksys, Microsoft, and Buffalo. If you have a desktop computer, make sure that you have an available USB port to plug the wireless network adapter into. If you don't have any open USB ports, buy a hub to add additional ports.
2.
Connect your wireless router
Since you'll be temporarily disconnected from the Internet, print these instructions before you go any further.
First, locate your cable modem or DSL modem and unplug it to turn it off.
Next, connect your wireless router to your modem. Your modem should stay connected directly to the Internet. Later, after you've hooked everything up, your computer will wirelessly connect to your router, and the router will send communications through your modem to the Internet.
wireless_chart.jpg Next, connect your router to your modem:

Oct 29, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have recently moved house from a virgin broadband connection taking my router and lap top with me. My new home has existing virgin broadband. Having plugged everything in as should be my laptop finds the...


Try reseating te broadband connection to the router.

It soundslike your router works if it connects to your laptop with a great signal. But its not sending any information through.

Try reseating. if it does not work. you might need to do a fresh reinstall of the router. Usually the broadband connections attach itself to a mac address of a network card. If you recently put a new router the network cards MAC address is different and it might not send signals through. like for me for cable i have the same issue.

Try this let me know how it does. If any problems please let me know.

I hope this helps
Please Rate.

Sep 18, 2008 | Belkin PC Desktops

1 Answer

My friend's asus A6000 has problems connecting to the wireless network. We have broadband at home, but his asus can only access it if it's physically plugged into the router. How can he get his asus to...


A couple of steps, not sure if you have tried them already

1) Ensure that his wireless is turned ON, it also need to be compliant with the router signal, normall b or g, it probably will be

2) In the system tray double click the wireless icon and make sure your network shows up. You may need to refresh. Then click the network and connect, you may need your password.

As i said, not sure what you have tried already, if this doesn't work or you need help with these write back.

Cheers

May 06, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Hi my router wont connect to comp.need help making connection between router and computer


Here's How:
  1. Choose a convenient location to begin installing your router such as an open floor space or table. This does not need to be the permanent location of the device. Particularly for wireless routers, you may find it necessary to re-position the unit after installing it as the cables / signals may not reach all areas needed. At the beginning, its better to choose a location where it's easiest to work with the router and worry about final placement later.

  2. Plug in the router's electrical power source, then turn on the router by pushing the power button.

  3. (Optional) Connect your Internet modem to the router. Most network modems connect via an Ethernet cable but USB connections are becoming increasingly common. The cable plugs into the router jack named "WAN" or "uplink" or "Internet." After connecting the cable, be sure to power cycle (turn off and turn back on) the modem to ensure the router recognizes it.

  4. Connect one computer to the router. Even if the router is a wireless model, connect this first computer to the router via a network cable. Using a cable during router installation ensures the maximum reliability of the equipment. Once a wireless router installation is complete, the computer can be changed over to a wireless connection if desired.

  5. Open the router's administration tool. From the computer connected to the router, first open your Web browser. Then enter the router's address for network administration in the Web address field and hit return to reach the router's home page.

    Many routers are reached by either the Web address "http://192.168.1.1" or "http://192.168.0.1" Consult your router's documentation to determine the exact address for your model. Note that you do not need a working Internet connection for this step.

  6. Log in to the router. The router's home page will ask you for a username and password. Both are provided in the router's documentation. You should change the router's password for security reasons, but do this after the installation is complete to avoid unnecessary complications during the basic setup.

  7. If you want your router to connect to the Internet, you must enter Internet connection information into that section of the router's configuration (exact location varies). If using DSL Internet, you may need to enter the PPPoE username and password. Likewise, if you have been issued a static IP address by your provider (you would need to have requested it), the static IP fields (including network mask and gateway) given to you by the provider must also must be set in the router.

  8. If you were using a primary computer or an older network router to connect to the Internet, your provider may require you to update the MAC address of the router with the MAC address of the device you were using previously. Read How to Change a MAC Address for a detailed description of this process.

  9. If this is a wireless router, change the network name (often called SSID). While the router comes to you with a network name set at the factory, you will never want to use this name on your network. Read How to Change the Router SSID for detailed instructions.

  10. Verify the network connection is working between your one computer and the router. To do this, you must confirmed that the computer has received IP address information from the router. See How to Find IP Addresses for a description of this process.

  11. (If applicable) Verify your one computer can connect to the Internet properly. Open your Web browser and visit a few Internet sites such as http://compnetworking.about.com/.

  12. Connect additional computers to the router as needed. If connecting wirelessly, ensure the network name (SSID) of each is computer matches that of the router.

  13. Finally, configure additional network security features as desired to guard your systems against Internet attackers. These WiFi Home Network Security Tips offer a good checklist to follow.
Tips:
  1. When connecting devices with network cables, be sure each end of the cable connects tightly. Loose cables are one of the most common sources of network setup problems.
What You Need:
  • A network router (wireless or wired)
  • Network adapters installed on all devices to be connected to the router
  • A working Internet modem (optional)
  • A Web browser installed at least one computer in the network

Please let me know if you need any further help and I would be glad to assist.

Thank you for using Fixya and Good Luck

Apr 19, 2008 | PC Desktops

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