Question about Sony HDRCX110 Camcorder

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E:61:00 code blinking on screen; Focus is enlarging the view (microscope type) at a distance of about 20"; anything closer or farther away looks blurry

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5 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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sonyspares
  • 89 Answers

SOURCE: Error Code E:61:00

The lens assembly has to be replaced. Pl.find a camcorder service center near by. We can support for the service manuals and spares. Do write to us for any further requirement

Posted on Dec 09, 2006

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jackboy
  • 2985 Answers

SOURCE: Blurry Vision

What are you looking at on the screen? Before or after the shot? The this point the taking sequence-point camera at scene look in screen blurry image - half press the release - autofocus comes into play- press all the way picture takes.Sharp picture in the taken images what are you doing?

Posted on Sep 08, 2007

ctf1800
  • 4402 Answers

SOURCE: Е:61 :00 flashing on screen

www.fewin.com/sony/sony.htm
check out this site for the mavica FD73 solution.
The problem is the lense focus adjustment motor.
Better explained in the above web site.
The sudden impact of the camera frees up the
adjustment mechanisms. Thus the error: E:61:00
disappears. I just fixed my Sony Mavica MVC FD 73.

Posted on Jan 25, 2008

  • 11967 Answers

SOURCE: At a recent school event (well lighted

It may have seemed well-lit but, from the camera's viewpoint, it needed some help. You should have set the ISO to a higher number so that hand-held shots would not be blurry and dark.

Posted on Dec 16, 2010

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By adjusting the diopter on your camera effect the image quality? I guess what I'm trying to say is, will the diopter setting effect how your camera adjusts the focus in auto or manual?


Diopter is for your eye only and does not effect the focus of the camera. By using the 1/2 down method, by pressing the photo taking button half way down, you can set the cameras focus. on some cameras this is shown where it will focus by a red square. If you change the diopter this is like adding by focal lenses for reading a book. and setting the distance your particular eye needs for eye relief. On binoculars this is done with screwing the eyepiece closer or farther away from the other lens. check out online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyeglass_prescription this will give you more details of what a diopter is or does. Always know what setting your shooting at as well. for instance if you are on a flower setting or Macro then this is for up close work. But up close doesn't mean too close. Most cameras on Macro need to be 6 inches to 12 inches away. But if you are say 24 inches away it won't focus right so don't try to zoom in, use your optical instead of digital and simply move closer or change the settings on the camera to a different setting or it may be blurry.

Jul 24, 2011 | Cameras

Tip

Explaining Camera Focus


Camera: Focus We've seen that a real image is formed by light moving through a convex lens. The nature of this real image varies depending on how the light travels through the lens. This light path depends on two major factors:
  • The angle of the light beam's entry into the lens
  • The structure of the lens
The angle of light entry changes when you move the object closer or farther away from the lens. You can see this in the diagram below. The light beams from the pencil point enter the lens at a sharper angle when the pencil is closer to the lens and a more obtuse angle when the pencil is farther away. But overall, the lens only bends the light beam to a certain total degree, no matter how it enters. Consequently, light beams that enter at a sharper angle will exit at a more obtuse angle, and vice versa. The total "bending angle" at any particular point on the lens remains constant. camera-diagram3.gif
As you can see, light beams from a closer point converge farther away from the lens than light beams from a point that's farther away. In other words, the real image of a closer object forms farther away from the lens than the real image from a more distant object. You can observe this phenomenon with a simple experiment. Light a candle in the dark, and hold a magnifying glass between it and the wall. You will see an upside down image of the candle on the wall. If the real image of the candle does not fall directly on the wall, it will appear somewhat blurry. The light beams from a particular point don't quite converge at this point. To focus the image, move the magnifying glass closer or farther away from the candle. camera-diagram2.gif
This is what you're doing when you turn the lens of a camera to focus it -- you're moving it closer or farther away from the film surface. As you move the lens, you can line up the focused real image of an object so it falls directly on the film surface. You now know that at any one point, a lens bends light beams to a certain total degree, no matter the light beam's angle of entry. This total "bending angle" is determined by the structure of the lens.




courtesy of HowStuffWorks.com

on Mar 21, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A520 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

How do i get a close up


That depends on the type of camera.

Many compact cameras have a macro mode, which allows the lens to focus much closer than normal.

With an interchangeable lens camera, one usually uses a macro lens which is designed to focus closer than non-macro lenses. One can also use extension tubes or bellows to put the lens farther away from the camera (which brings the focal plane closer). Another technique that works for many lenses is to reverse it (putting the lens on backward), though this requires a reverse adapter.

To get even closer, many cameras can be mounted onto a microscope.

Dec 23, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

My SD550 will not focus. It appears to take good "macro" pictures, but anything farther away is blurry. The camera is set to auto.


If you have the camera set to "macro" it will not take normal distance pictures...you must get it out of the "macro" setting.

Nov 12, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SD550 / IXUS 750 Digital...

1 Answer

Digital Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera with EF-S 18-55mm Lens: my rebel xti won't shoot a macro shot. There's pl...


There is a minimal focusing distance for all lenses. If you move closer to the subject than that distance then the camera won't focus on it. Check you lens manual for minimal focusing distance. It is 11 inches for Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 USM, for example.

May 16, 2010 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

2 Answers

How do I enlarge my email screen


Place two of your fingers on the iPhone screen close together and enlarge your messages by sliding them away from each other. The farther you slide your fingers apart, the larger the letters/images will be.
You can also do this zoom-in motion while in Safari, Photo, or other apps.
To go back to normal size, just double-tap on the iPhone screen using any of your fingers.
Visit my blog for more iPhone / iPod touch tips. Also, view my other tips here in FixYa.

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Apr 29, 2010 | Apple iPhone 3G

1 Answer

Focus is not working well on distances far away -endless position


Sounds to me like a hardware problem. Pls send ur lens to Nikon to have it looked into

Sep 13, 2009 | Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR...

1 Answer

Double image


The distance between the centers of the eyepieces of your binocular must be the same as the distance between your pupils. This distance is adjusted as follows: 1. Focus on a distant object. 2. Pivot the two halves of your binocular farther or closer apart until you can see a single unobstructed, circular field of view. Make sure to focus on a distant object when you do this because when you focus on a close object you always see two slightly overlapping circular fields. Your binocular may have a scale on the top, between the eyepieces, to help you remember this setting.

Aug 03, 2007 | Bushnell 10 x 42mm Sportsman Binoculars

1 Answer

Double vision


The distance between the centers of the eyepieces of your binocular must be the same as the distance between your pupils. This distance is adjusted as follows: 1. Focus on a distant object. 2. Pivot the two halves of your binocular farther or closer apart until you can see a single unobstructed, circular field of view. Make sure to focus on a distant object when you do this because when you focus on a close object you always see two slightly overlapping circular fields. Your binocular may have a scale on the top, between the eyepieces, to help you remember this setting.

Jul 03, 2007 | Bushnell Powerview - Compact 10 x 25...

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