Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

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After taking pictures with bright colors, image in the viewer blink black/white over brightly lit objects...Help, it's making me crazy!

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You're seeing blown-out highlights. These are the portions of your picture that have been so overexposed that they've gone pure white, losing all detail. This is generally considered a bad thing so the camera is warning you about it. But the camera doesn't know what you're taking a picture of, things like the sun reflecting off polished chrome should go pure white, so it's just a warning.

Usually the proper fix is to reduce exposure, bringing back the lost details. This risks losing details in the shadows as they go pure black, but that's generally considered not as bad. After all, we don't expect to see things in the dark.

That was the long answer. The short answer is to press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your picture.

Posted on May 18, 2011

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My Coby LEDTV 1926 blinks red, green, blue, white, and black. Is there anyway to fix this?


Sorry I can't help, but mine does the same thing sometimes. It'll work fine for awhile, then no picture, but goes crazy and flashes one color at a time across the whole display, very brightly. I have it connected to RCA inputs, so I don't know if it would happen using the antenna input, but based on your experience, I suspect it would. I never got around to calling tech support, and my return period ends in two days, so it's going back to the store tomorrow.

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Pictures taken outside are white


Keep in mind and check some setting... ISO increases sensitivity to light. Increasing your ISO is a low light solution. For a brightly lit subject, you needn't go for high ISOs.

If this problem persists, could s
ound like a problem with the CCD Image sensor go to bad. In both cases this isn't a job that you could solve yourself; this wrong include distorted images or abnormal colors, scratchy purple lines, blank or black pictures, and/or black videos with good sound being recorded on the camera's flash card.

I suggest check THIS LINK for additional details in this previous solutions for an Defective CCD (Charge Coupled Device) and next contact your Canon service. I strongly suggest (taking into consideration the age of your camera) to evaluate the cost of repair versus the cost of a new camera with similar features, before making a final desicion.

Hope this helps
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Oct 16, 2011 | Casio Exilim EX-S500 Digital Camera

2 Answers

When shooting in bright light and high ISO most of the picture is coming out black.


Sound like a problem with the CCD Image sensor go to bad. In both cases this isn't a job that you could solve yourself; this wrong include distorted images or abnormal colors, scratchy purple lines, blank or black pictures, and/or black videos with good sound being recorded on the camera's flash card.

I suggest check THIS LINK for additional details in this previous solutions for an Defective CCD (Charge Coupled Device) and next contact your Canon service. I strongly suggest (taking into consideration the age of your camera) to evaluate the cost of repair versus the cost of a new camera with similar features, before making a final desicion.

Hope this helps
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Oct 02, 2011 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

I bought a Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W530 camera 4 weeks ago. About 2 weeks ago the screen developed a bright white spot along the one corner- the display would not show in that area. I didn't do anything...


If you turn off the LCD screen and use the viewfinder, same problem? Even with this wrong, are you try to take pics and see this in your pc? They are white or with some lines over image?

Two things there, first... could be a problem with the viewer screen, or, second choice could a problem CCD sensor go to bad; in both cases this isn't a job that you could solve yourself; this wrong include distorted images or abnormal colors, scratchy purple lines, blank or black pictures, and/or black videos with good sound being recorded on the camera's flash card.

I suggest check THIS LINK for additional details in this previous solutions for an Defective CCD (Charge Coupled Device) and next contact your Olympus service.
I strongly suggest (taking into consideration the age of your camera) to evaluate the cost of repair versus the cost of a new camera with similar features, before making a final desicion.

Keep in mind and check if even you are underwarranty, if yes, applied.

Hope this helps.

Jul 21, 2011 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W530 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to change the 'Contrast' and 'Brightness' on the monitor screen


Bootup your computer and display your Windows Desktop. Make sure yourmonitor stays on for at least half an hour before you begin, so that itis properly warmed up.


Seta pure black image on the monitor so you can adjust the brightness. Toget a pure black image, do the following: Choose Start, then ControlPanel, then Display. This will open the Display Properties dialog box.Click the down arrow next to the representation of the desktop color inthe Color field. Choose black from the color palette, then click OK.


Maximizethe Brightness control on your monitor, then slowly reduce it until theblack of the image perfectly matches the black at the edge of thephysical screen. This puts the brightness at the proper setting.


Open a screen with a plain white background soyou can adjust the contrast. One of the best ways to do this is to open aword-processing document without any text in it. Gradually reduce the contrastsetting of your monitor until the white area of the screen begins to lookslightly gray or off-white. Then gradually increase the contrast until thewhite area on your monitor is pure white. This will give you the proper whitebalance. Now you've got your monitor ready for peak performance.

Hope this may help you solve your problem.























Nov 12, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Faded and bright


Dull Video...

Your set may have one or more of the following symptoms....

*Dull looking picture
*White looking picture
*Halos around objects
*Red/Orange looking picture

Convergence

* Screen Looks 3D, Warped, Distorted, etc
* Colors do not line up
* TV may shut off - and make a chirping sound.


bb0cf99.pngYou can see some more examples and find a fix using this link on Fixya http://www.fixya.com/support/r2861467-solution_video_looking_whiteish_dull

May 17, 2010 | Philips 60PP9352 60" Rear Projection...

2 Answers

In the past few day i've noticed the picture is


BRIGHTNESS. Your owner's manual probably says that the brightness setting is used to control "brightness" or "picture intensity" or something other fuzzy non-descript term. The truth is that brightness is used to set the BLACK level in the picture.
On most TVs and projectors in use today, brightness is set too high. That's because people think "a bright picture is good, so I will set it as bright as I can get." Well, that's nice in theory, but entirely wrong in practice. Setting the brightness level too high makes a black tuxedo look gray rather than black. It muddies up the shadow areas, and reduces the overall snap and crispness that the picture would have if properly calibrated.
To find the right setting for brightness, go to the image in your movie that has textured blacks and hopefully some shadow/low light areas in which there is detail. Then freeze on that frame. As you move the brightness control down, the intensity of the blacks will increase, and shadows will get darker. As you move the control all the way to zero, you will (hopefully) see that the low light shadow areas will also go to solid black and lose their detail.
The optimum setting for brightness is achieved at just the point where true black objects appear as black as your system will make them while retaining as much visible detail in the shadow areas. Above this point the blacks appear to go grayer. Below this point you lose detail in the shadows. On many video systems, this optimum point is toward the lower end of the brightness scale. But find the point that looks correct to you regardless of where it is on the scale.
CONTRAST. The contrast control is similarly confusing. It is also often set too high on the theory that contrast is good, and therefore we might as well get the most we can out of our set by turning it all the way up. In fact, the contrast setting is used to control the intensity of the brightest highlights in the picture, so it is (oddly enough) the opposite of brightness control.
First, find your test scene in which you find textured whites in bright light, and freeze that frame. You are looking for the brightest elements in the picture in which you want to retain visible detail.
Let's assume you have a whitewashed fence in sunlight. If you start with the contrast set low, the fence will appear light gray rather than white. As you move the contrast control up, the fence will get whiter. Eventually details in the texture of the fence will begin to disappear.
If you continue to push contrast past the optimum point, the wood-grain texture of the fence will go solid white and all visible detail will be obliterated. Push contrast up even a little further, and our fenceposts might actually appear to expand very slightly due to a glow around the edges. This phenomenon, called "blooming" is a definite sign that your contrast setting is overcooking the image (and maybe your picture tube as well—don't ever leave the contrast control set this high!!!)
Find the point at which whites look white while retaining as much texture detail as possible. This is your optimum contrast setting. On most video systems, this setting is toward the higher end of the scale, but it can be anywhere. Find the point that looks correct to you. (By the way, unlike TV's, digital projectors will not bloom)
Now…note the following: brightness and contrast can be to some degree interactive. Your new contrast setting may have affected your brightness. So return to the brightness scene and verify that your blacks are still black, and you still have maximum detail in the shadows. Adjust it if necessary, then return and adjust the contrast setting once again if necessary. (You can see that this is much easier if the black and white elements you are testing all appear in the same image!)
COLOR. The color control on your set determines the level of color intensity in the image. One of the most common errors people make in calibrating their video systems is overdriving the color. That's what makes Larry King look reddish-orange on the TV at the gym. Overdriving color is common because once again, people naturally think, "I want to get as much color as I can out of this color TV, so I will crank it up some to make sure I get the most out of it!" No. Bad mistake.
If you move the color setting down to zero you will notice that your picture will turn into a black and white image. The optimum setting for color is achieved by increasing the setting just to the point where colors look natural and not a bit more! Flesh tones should look natural and without any hint of an unnatural glow. Grass should look naturally green rather than screaming spray-paint green.
When adjusting color, make sure that your test image has relatively unsaturated colors. Flesh tones or natural landscapes are ideal. It is impossible to set color properly if you are using a brilliant red Ferrari as your test subject.
On the large majority of video systems, the optimum setting for color is somewhere near the middle of the scale. However, trust your eyes for the optimum setting and think "what looks like the most natural, accurate reproduction of reality?" Any overdriving of color will make the image look artificial.
TINT or HUE. The tint control adjusts color balance rather than color intensity. It is an easy control to set properly, but for some reason many people don't get it right. When flesh tones look either too green or too magenta, a phenomenon you see with amazing frequency, it is because the tint control is not set properly.
Find a human face and freeze-frame it. (In choosing your test subject, note that lighter skin tones will show errors in tint more readily than darker skin tones). As you move the tint control to one end of the spectrum, the face turns green; as you move it to the other extreme, the face turns magenta (red+blue).
The correct setting for tint is the point near the middle of the scale at which you can detect no hint of either green or magenta. It is the most neutral point between the two extremes. The flesh tone looks the most natural at this point.
SHARPNESS or DETAIL. The final setting is sharpness or detail. Now, pray tell, who in their right mind wouldn't want the sharpest, most detailed picture they could get? And since there is a control that lets you turn it up, why not turn it up? That's what many folks do, and of course it's exactly the wrong thing to do.
The sharpness control adds processed information to the picture that is NOT part of the original video signal. It adds artificially highlighted edges, and makes the picture look less natural than it otherwise would. This is most evident along the continuous edge of a dark object against a middle-toned background. When sharpness is overdriven the dark edge will be outlined by a white ringing effect that increases contrast just along the edge of your dark object. That edge "highlighting" effect is created by the sharpness control. It is an artificial manipulation of the image. It wasn't in the original scene, and it shouldn't be on your screen either.
On most televisions, the optimum setting for sharpness is zero. On many digital projectors, the optimum setting is either in the low or middle part of the scale. Picture tube televisions and digital projectors behave differently in this regard; on a digital projector it is often possible to fuzz the image by setting sharpness too low.
Now look at your picture with the sharpness turned down or off depending on what works best on your system. You will see a smoother, more natural image. It might take some getting used to, since you may be accustomed to viewing video with all the artificial edge enhancements that create the illusion of added sharpness.
However, when the interference and noise from the artificial sharpness enhancer is removed, you are seeing the most genuine reproduction of the video signal that your projector or TV is capable of. And if you view it for a while, you will gain an appreciation for just how smooth, natural, and satisfying the picture can really look.

Dec 12, 2009 | Sony Grand WEGA KDF-55XS955 55" Rear...

1 Answer

When ever there is a picture taken there is a flicker when i view the picture in my camera it happens only on the bright spots ...ehy is it


It's normal.

The Nikon dSLRs have various LCD display modes, and one of them is called "highlight clipping warning display". Basically, when you set your LCD display to "highlight clipping warning display"(it's the mode right before the "histogram display"), it blinks white/black wherever your picture has blown highlights (i.e. where your picture is overexposed)

A histogram display is very helpful in telling whether you've got the exposure right, but to it isn't adequate by itself. With digital cameras, it's very important not to blow-out the highlights in a picture (they're similar to color positive film in that respect), since once you hit the maximum brightness, the image just saturates, and any highlight detail will be lost. A histogram display does a pretty good job of telling you how the image as a whole is doing, but what if there are just a few critical areas that you're worried about for the highlights? If only a small percentage of the total frame is involved, it won't account for many pixels. That means any peak at the "white" end of the histogram graph would be pretty small, and easy to miss (or just plain invisible). What to do? The folks at Nikon recognized this problem some time ago, and so have provided another special display mode on the D60 (as on most of their dSLRs) that they simply call "highlights," accessible via the Playback settings menu, under "Display Mode." This mode blinks any highlights that are saturated in any of the color channels. It does this by taking the nearly-white areas on the LCD and toggling them between white and black.

Aug 03, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon d1(I know its an oldie) screen is CRAZY!


Yes, the blinking is normal. read here for more info on what the display screen is telling you, plus a bunch more on your new camera: Nikon D1

Mar 26, 2008 | Nikon D1H Set Digital Camera

1 Answer

Medion 9700 digital camera


The problem seems to be in the part of the process of taking picture when the camera scans the scene for brightness, to correct exposure. Bright regions turn greeny blue when taken. Low light images are usually unaffected. The problem can be testes by waving a dark object in front of the camera just before shooting. This implies that the good image result (if over exposed) is not a faulty CCD. It seems that the camera has trouble determining the colour balance or white brightness and tries to compensate by post processing.

I will look for a further solution.

Dec 26, 2006 | Medion 9653 Digital Camera

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