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To share files on network using xp, but only allow certain users over the network from several computers to have acceess to certain files. looking for a user and password prompt to access certain shared files.

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Only the administrator has the access for sharing files on network if you are the administartor on the computer you will be able to share any files If you are working in a corporate enviornment you will have to seek permission to share files hope this solution helps you

Posted on Aug 14, 2008

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I am installing multiple worksations and need to know how to put them together. Is there a amnual?


There are networking books but networking is so complex that people specialize in just networking as a career.
If they are windows based machines all having thier own hard drive and Windows OS then the setup can be as simple or as complicated as you make it. I will give you basic instructions on how to do a basic easy network. First there are 2 kinds of networks you can build.

Static. Where you assign network addresses to each computer.
Dynamic (DHCP) where the network address is automatically assigned to each computer.

(An example of an address would be 192.168.1.1 this would normally be your routers address. You can have or change these numbers up to 255.255.255.255 but most people leave the numbers alone and dont mess with these settings in the router.)

For simplicity I will go with Dynamic. This allows you to let the computer do most of the work for you.
First get a router if you dont already have one. This device will assign network addresses to each computer on the system and also allow you to share the internet. If you are not using high speed internet you still use a router but you dont have to do the internet connection portion of the router setup.
Now all the computers on the system are on the same network as far as adresses are concearned. If you need to hook up more computers than you have ports on the router you can add in a switch. This is like a splitter for one of the connections on the router.
If you need all of the computers to talk to each other you will need to set up all the computers to be on the same Workgroup and allow file and printer sharing on each computer.
WIth XP you click start and then control panel. Look to the left of the window that pops up and make sure your on classic view. You should see see a network setup wizzard click that and follow through:
Using existing connection (normally)
CLick next
Create a computer name (I leave the description blank but you might put something in for easy Identification of each machine)
Click next
Create a workgroup name. (MSHOME is default in XP. Change it to something you will remember)
Click the Turn on File and Print Sharing dot.
Click next
Windows will probably show you what you did.
Click next
Windows will configure your computer for the new settings and then ask if you want to create a network setup disk. I normall just click the dot next to "Just finish wizzard". When you finish the wizzard you will need to restart your computer. As you do this each computer should end up with a shared documents folder that you can see by clicking on start and then computer. To see the other computers shared folders you will need to go to Network places. Place any files you want to share in the computers shared folder and the other computers will be able to see the file by browsing the appropriate computers shared folder.

If you are using Vista then you go to: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Join-or-create-a-workgroup

and follwo the instructions there. If you have Windows 7 the instructions are almost the exact same as Vista.

There is a special network setup feature built into Windows 7 called homegroup but unless all of your computers Are Windows 7 and at least one is Windows 7 Pro you will want to do the above setup I started you with.
Hope this helps... Dale

Apr 20, 2011 | PC Desktops

Tip

Network Windows 7 with Xp and Vista


Windows 7 includes a new way to share data between all computers in the house with the Residential Group. But only when computers running Windows 7 may join the Group residential and enjoy the new features of sharing, playing multimedia files remotely, etc.. If you have computers running Windows XP or Windows Vista networking with Windows 7, you can still share your files and printers in Windows 7 "old" by following the instructions in this case practice. Below are the steps to do the same.
Check the workgroup:

To be a network, your computers with XP, Vista and Windows 7 should be part of the same workgroup.
Click the Start button. Right-click Computer (My Computer in XP) and click Properties. 

In the Settings area of the computer name, verify the name of the working group. The default name is WORKGROUP but you can customize it by clicking the Change Settings button. 

Make sure it is the same on other machines on the network. Under XP, the information is in the Computer Name tab.

Enable Sharing:

To enable sharing in Windows 7, you must change the settings of the Network and Sharing Center.
Click Start, then Control Panel. 

Click Network and Internet and then click Network and Sharing Center. 

In the left column, click Change sharing settings advanced. 

Verify that the options Enable network discovery, Enable file sharing and printer sharing and Enable so that anyone with network access can read and write are checked. 

Click Save Changes.



on May 19, 2010 | PC Desktops

Tip

Set up and Use Internet Connection Sharing


Hi,

To enable Internet Connection Sharing on a network connection

You must be logged on to your computer with an owner account in order to complete this procedure.
Open Network Connections. (Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double–click Network Connections.)

Click the dial–up, local area network, PPPoE, or VPN connection you want to share, and then, under Network Tasks, click Change settings of this connection.

On the Advanced tab, select the Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection check box.
If you want this connection to dial automatically when another computer on your home or small office network attempts to access external resources, select the Establish a dial–up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access the Internet check box.

If you want other network users to enable or disable the shared Internet connection, select the Allow other network users to control or disable the shared Internet connection check box.

Under Internet Connection Sharing, in Home networking connection, select any adapter that connects the computer sharing its Internet connection to the other computers on your network. The Home networking connection is only present when two or more network adapters are installed on the computer.


To configure Internet options on your client computers for Internet Connection Sharing

Open Internet Explorer. Click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Internet Explorer.)

On the Tools menu, click Internet Options.

On the Connections tab, click Never dial a connection, and then click LAN Settings.

In Automatic configuration, clear the Automatically detect settings and Use automatic configuration script check boxes.

In Proxy Server, clear the Use a proxy server check box.


Good luck!

Bhautesh.

on Feb 24, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How to network connect and activate windows 2007 & MAC X


Set up user accounts

Users connecting to Windows Sharing must have user accounts on the Mac OS X computer that is sharing. There is no guest access. Any person who already has an account on the Mac OS X computer can use his existing account. You must log in to the Mac OS X computer with an administrator account to set this up. The steps differ for new and existing users.

For new users
  1. From the Apple menu, choose System Preferences.
  2. From the View menu, choose Accounts.
  3. Click New User (10.2) or the "+" button (10.3 or later).
  4. Enter the Name and Short Name for the user who will log in from Windows.

    The user's short name is exactly how the user will enter their name when they log in to Windows Sharing. The short name is always lowercase.

    For users of Windows 98: If you log in to Windows 98 with a username, make sure it matches your Mac OS X account's short name. If you do not log in to Windows 98 with a username, you will need to create a new Windows 98 username that matches the account short name in Mac OS X. For more information on using Windows operating systems, please see Microsoft documentation or contact Microsoft for further assistance.
  5. Enter the user's password.
  6. 10.2 only: Click the checkbox for "Allow user to log in from Windows".
  7. 10.2 only: Click OK.
  8. Quit System Preferences.

If your Windows PC has is equipped with an Ethernet port, you can connect your PC and Macintosh using an Ethernet cable. By doing this, you are creating a small local network, consisting of just the two computers. Set up your Windows PC by turning on File Sharing. Refer to the instructions that came with your Windows PC if you're not sure how to do this.

To locate and connect to the Windows computer, you can use the sidebar in a Finder window. You need to know the workgroup name for the computer and the network name (called the "computer name") for the computer. To connect to the computer, you also need a user name and password and the name of the shared folder you want to access. If you don't have this information, contact the person who owns the computer or your network administrator.

If you cannot locate the Windows computer in the Network browser, you may be able to connect to it using the Connect To Server dialog in the Finder.

Make sure the Internet Connection Firewall is turned off, or if it's on make sure TCP port 445 is open to allow sharing connections.
To connect you Mac and Windows computers: step_1.gif

In the Finder, choose Go > "Connect to Server."
step_2.gif

Type the network address for the computer in the Server Address text box using one of these formats:

smb://DNSname/sharename smb://IPaddress/sharename
step_3.gif

Follow the onscreen instructions to type the workgroup name and a user name and password, and choose the shared folder you want to access.

Feb 23, 2011 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

How to share a desktop


If you need to sharedesktop inside lan means you can use vnc viewer,tight vnc viewer
If you need to share the desktop through internet you can use teamviewer,logmein
You can also share the desktop by using chat software in some chat clients you can see share my desktop option

Mar 04, 2010 | Dell Dimension 1100 PC Desktop

Tip

Sharing Your Own Computer's Stuff with the Network


To share a file or folder with your fellow computer users, move the file into your Shared Documents folder, which lives in your My Computer window. (You must move or copy a file into the Shared Documents folder; shortcuts don't always work.)

After you place your file or folder into your Shared Documents folder, it appears in the Shared Documents folder of everybody else using your computer.

Administrators can share folders without having to move them into the Shared Documents folder. The trick is to follow these steps:

1. Right-click on a folder you'd like to share and choose Sharing and Security from the pop-up menu.

Open My Computer and right-click on the folder you'd like to share. When the menu appears, select Sharing and Security. A window appears, showing the Properties for that folder. It opens to the Sharing tab.

Right-click on a folder and choose Sharing and Security to share the folder on the network.

2. Click the box marked Share This Folder on the Network.

A check mark in that box lets everybody peek at, grab, steal, change, or delete any of the files in that folder. To let visitors look inside the files but not change them, remove the check mark from the box marked Allow Network Users to Change My Files.

3. Click OK.

Now that particular folder and all its contents are available for everybody on the network to share.

Sharing a lot of folders isn't a good idea because it gives network visitors too much control over your computer. Even if you trust people, they might accidentally mess something up. To be safe, only share files by placing them in the Shared Document folder.

Inside Shared Documents live two more folders, Shared Music and Shared Pictures. Those two folders are also available to any user. So, if you want to share documents with any user of your computer, store them in the Shared Documents folder. When you make MP3s from your CDs, store them in the Shared Music folder, too, so that everybody can enjoy them.

on Dec 01, 2009 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Transfer all files from my old desktop to new laptop


you can do that by following the steps below;
Instructions
  1. Step 1 Connect your laptop to your desktop through a home network connection. If you have a home network, you can hook up your laptop to it via an Ethernet cable or a wireless network card. Then, you can set a folder on your desktop computer to be shared across the network. To set a folder as shared in Windows, simply right click on it, select "Sharing and security," select the "Share" tab and check the box labeled "Share this folder on the network." You will then be able to access this folder from your laptop and transfer files to your.hard drive.
  2. Step 2 Purchase a USB jump drive. These handy devices are the size of a key but can store five gigabytes of files or even more, depending on the type of USB jump drive you buy. Insert the USB jump drive into your USB port and your operating system should find it as new hardware. If a window doesn't automatically come up, you can find in your drives under "My Computer." Then, you can click and drag files into it, remove the drive and take it to your desktop computer and access the files there.
  3. Step 3 Put your files onto another external storage device, such a CD, floppy disk or external hard drive. Files are transferable between any computers as long as you can store them on something external, then use that external device to move them to the other computer.
  4. Step 4 Email files to yourself. If you only have a few files that you would like to transfer and don't have any of the equipment used in Steps 1 through 3, send yourself an email with the files attached, access your email from the other computer and download the files to your hard drive.

Sep 10, 2009 | Dell PC Desktops

1 Answer

Vista and xp network


  1. All computers should have installed and enabled file and printer sharing, which you can see and change in the properties of the network connection.
  2. All computers should have enabled file and printer sharing as an exception for the Windows firewall.
  3. Sometimes you need to install the IPX protocol on the network connection.

May 05, 2009 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I am trying to set a network using a wired desktop and a wireless laptop (desktop using XP and laptop using Vista)I am using a Linksys WRT160N, I can get on the internet with no issues at all but when...


in the router's lan (not wan) configuration - set the dhcp server (gateway address) to be 10.1.10.1. Then set the addresses of the clients (connected to the router) to be assigned addresses from 10.1.10.10 - 10.1.10.20. Set the desktop's TCP/IP address to be 10.1.10.11 (static) with a subnet of 255.255.255.0, and a gateway address of 10.1.10.1. Set the laptop's wireless connection (TCP/IP adapter) to have a static 10.1.10.12 address with same subnet mask and gateway address of desktop. Change the workgroup on both computers to be of the same name (case sensitive here) to a name such as HOMENETWORK. Then on each computer, open up "My Computer" and right click on folders, files or printers that you want to share on your network!

Sep 26, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Computer sharing


Hi,

Initially, I would suggest that you:
1. Make both members of the same workgroup;
2. verify that the Subnet Mask are identical to both PCs in their networking configuration; and
3. verify that the Folder or files are shared by viewing the folder or files properties making making sure that there is a check mark on "Share this folder on the network and/or "Allow network users to change my files".

Should the above be not corrective of your concern, pls post back.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back as requested, how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards.

Thank you for using FixYa.

Apr 09, 2008 | PC Desktops

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