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To share files on network using xp, but only allow certain users over the network from several computers to have acceess to certain files. looking for a user and password prompt to access certain shared files.

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Only the administrator has the access for sharing files on network if you are the administartor on the computer you will be able to share any files If you are working in a corporate enviornment you will have to seek permission to share files hope this solution helps you

Posted on Aug 14, 2008

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How to use comupter as sever


Proxy server
Use a Computer as a Proxy Server
Small networks can still take advantage of a proxy server.
The Microsoft Windows operating system allows you to turn your computer into a proxy server.
A proxy server is a central computer on the network connected to the Internet.
Other computers on the network use the machine to connect to the Internet.
The Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) configurations on the machine allow you to turn your computer into a proxy server.

Click the Windows "Start" button and select "Control Panel."
Double-click "Network and Internet Connections."
Double-click "Network Connections" to view a list of network card settings.
Right-click your network card icon and select "Properties."
For most users, this icon is labeled "Local Network."
Click the "Advanced" tab.

Check the box named "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection" in the section labeled "Internet Connection Sharing."
A warning message pops up telling you that your IP is reset for the proxy computer.
Click "OK."

Reboot your computer for the settings to take effect.
You also need to reboot each client machine on the network to ensure they see the proxy server.
Turn a Computer Into a Server
When you have more than several computers and users who want to share files and resources, whether in your home or in a small office, you can convert a computer into a server.
Building a server out of a computer will allow users to access files whichever computer they use to access them.
An example of the resources that can be shared is a printer and shared folders such as photos and documents. Here's how to convert a computer into a server.

Prepare your computer.
Clean up the computer with unnecessary files to save on space.
If your computer is really old, install the latest operating software so that it is compatible with the rest of the computers that will share its resources.
For this example, we are installing Windows XP.
Check the hard drive space or capacity if you have enough.
You can do away with 256MB sized old computer, but you may want to think about adding more disk space for future needs.
You can easily buy extra internal or external hard drives to bump up your disk space to a capacity that you would desire.
Try purchasing a 10GB extra disk drive then insert it in computer or connect via a serial port or USB hub it if it is external drive.
To install the hard drive driver on XP, let the hardware wizard run you through the options.
You can install the driver with the installation CD software that your hard drive came with.
Follow the options during installation. ,


Check your computer if the network card (ethernet card) is functioning properly. if it does not, you would need to install a NIC or Network Interface Card.
Some old computers have 10 megabit cards, but if you want to have high network performance and better connectivity through your LAN (Local Area Network) then you would need to upgrade your NIC by installing a 100 megabit or 10 gigabit NIC.
Install your network card driver using the installation CD that came with it then follow the installation wizard.

Get a network router. Connect this router to your high speed connection.
The most common ones to use are Netgear, Linksys or DLink routers.
Choose a wireless router so that if you have wireless users they can connect easily (plus this will save you on trying to connect cables to the router all over the place).
Set up your network connections.
Click on "Start," "Control Panel and "Network and Internet Connections."
Pick a task from the options listed or pick a control panel icon, in this case "Network Connections."
If you are set up to pick up the IP Address of your computer automatically, one you have installed your NIC in Step 4 and rebooted, it will pick up the connections automatically whether plugs in using a LAN or network cable or using wireless card.

Rename your computer. Name it so that it can easily be identifiable in your network.
You can either name it simply "SERVER" to be easily recognized, but it is all up to you how you want to name your server.
To name your server if you are using Windows XP, you can right-click on "My Computer" then click on "Properties."
Go to "Computer Name" tab then click on "Change."
Other Windows operating systems or versions would have this feature located somewhere else. Read the owner's manual that your computer came with it.

Create a shared folder by going to "My Computer" and "C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents."
Create a new folder by right-clicking on the screen, then click on "New Folder."
Name the new folder "Shared Files" or anything that can easily be identifiable.
Take note that on Windows XP, any folder that you create and then dragged into the "Shared Documents" folder will be automatically shared by everyone.
You can restrict certain folders by dragging the folder out of the "Shared Documents" folder, then right-clicking on the file folder, clicking on "Properties," then the "Sharing" tab and finally "Make this Folder Private."
Create a shared resource by adding a printer or fax to use. Go to "Start."
Click on "Printers and Faxes" and "Add a Printer," then let the installation wizard that came with the printer or fax guide you.
Name your printer or fax (for example, "Shared Printer").
Then once the printer is installed, set it up so that you can share it by right-clicking on the "Shared Printer," then on "Properties," "Sharing" tab and finally on "Share this printer."
Connect any computer to your server.
Go to each computer and ensure they are connected on the same router.
Then go to "Start" and "Run," type in "EXPLORER," then on the menu click on "Tools" and "Map Network Drive."
A window will pop open where you will assign a "Drive" letter and a "Folder."
Choose any driver letter, for example "G" to denote "Group" drive or "S" to denote "Shared Drive," then type in the IP address of the server.
To do this, go to the server, then go to "Start" and "Run," type in "CMD" then type in "IPCONFIG." This will display your server's IP address.
Type the IP address on the "Folder" field on the computer.
You can also try if the computer will automatically find it by choosing the drive letter then clicking on the "Browse" button on the "Folder" field.
Start using the shared resources by going to the drive letter that has been assigned on your computer.



Sep 24, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

HP1020 problem with a livebox and WIN7 configuration


I found it somewhat difficult to completely Unshare files and folders on my HomeGroup Network and still allow Printer sharing in Windows 7 (Home Premium).

Initial UnSharing still allowed files like those below to be viewed on other home network computers:

C:/Users/

{user x} (folder)

AppData (folder)

Default (folder

Public (folder)

desktop.ini (file)

Other computers on the home network could step through many levels of hiarchy in the AppData folder and appeared to have "Delete" access!!

To completely decouple the computers, I had to go through the following several different Sharing/Unsharing assignment locations, till I could completely break the linkage.

I would appreciate any clarifications or simplifications.

File UnShare Confusion on HomeGroup Network

There are several different Network Sharing/Protection assignment locations in Windows 7.

To prevent all sharing between computers on the Homegroup Network, but allow Printer Sharing:

1) Start->Control Panel ->Network and Sharing Center->Choose Homegroup and sharing options.

Uncheck sharing boxes that you don't want to share. Save changes.

2) Start->Control Panel ->Network and Sharing Center->Choose Homegroup and sharing options->Change advanced sharing settings.

Click "Turn off Public folder sharing (people logged on to this computer can still access these folders)".

3) Start->Control Panel ->Network and Sharing Center->Choose Homegroup and sharing options->Change advanced sharing settings.

Choose Media streaming options.

Click "Block All" button. Turn off. Click OK.

Anomaly Note: You have to close Control Panel and repeat all step 3 again for the change to take effect.

4) Open Windows Explorer.

a) Select "C:/", select "Users" folder with single click, then click "Share with" in toolbar.

b) Select Advanced sharing.

Under Sharing tab, select Advanced Sharing. Uncheck box labeled "Share this folder". Apply and close.

5) Open Windows Explorer.

Select "C:/Users/", select all folders and files under "Users", then click "Share with" in toolbar, then click "Nobody".

6) Verify success by going to other home network computer(s) and trying to access your files and folders. You should only be able to see there is a computer and not be able to see any folders of files.

smooth printer service

Dec 16, 2012 | HP LaserJet 1020 Printer

1 Answer

Hi, I have two pc running with windows xp operating system. From User 1 i need to access user 2 windows folder and program files folder otherway around also but I can't how? Even if I shared windows folder...


First thing Windows XP Home Edition will give you numerous problems when sharing files, you should consider using windows XP Pro for that sort of operations.

Assuming you have Windows XP Pro installed in both computers:

1 - Create the same user on both computers ( same account name, same password ) blank passwords are not allow between file sharing as per windows xp group policy.

2 - Create a resource to share ( example: C:\)

3 - Disable simple file sharing

* go to control panel
* click on folder options
* click the VIEW tab
* unckeck the use sharing wizard

4 - Make sure that the user that will be used for authenticating between computers have the proper NTFS permissions and the proper access to the shared sources.

5 - Try to connect to the shared sources when asked for username and password type the credentials of the newly created user.

Now you should be able to connect to the shared sources both ways.

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Oct 18, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How can i set up network file sharing


First step is to check if the file sharing option is checked in my computer folder options.

Start- My computer- TOOLS - FOLDER OPTIONS- and click on the second tab VIEW- scroll down to the last option which will show as USE SIMPLE FILE SHARING.

Level 1: My Documents (Private) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder has read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. All subfolders that are contained in a folder that is marked as private remain private unless you change the parent folder permissions.

If you are a Computer Administrator and create a user password for your account by using the User Accounts Control Panel tool, you are prompted to make your files and folder private.

Note The option to make a folder private (Level 1) is available only to a user account in its own My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 1, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Select the Make this Folder Private check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 2 (Default): My Documents (Default) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder and local Computer Administrators have read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. This is the default setting for all the folders and files in each user's My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 2, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Make sure that both the Make this Folder Private and the Share this folder on the network check boxes are cleared, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 3: Files in shared documents available to local users loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared with users who log on to the computer locally. Local Computer Administrators can read, write, and delete the files in the Shared Documents folder. Restricted Users can only read the files in the Shared Documents folder. In Windows XP Professional, Power Users may also read, write, or delete any files in the Shared Documents Folder. The Power Users group is available only in Windows XP Professional. Remote users cannot access folders or files at Level 3. To allow remote users to access files, you must share them out on the network (Level 4 or 5).

To configure a file or a folder and all the files in it to Level 3, start Microsoft Windows Explorer, and then copy or move the file or folder to the Shared Documents folder under My Computer.

Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • Power Users: Change
  • Restricted Users: Read
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 4: Shared on the Network (Read-Only) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared for everyone to read on the network. All local users, including the Guest account, can read the files. But they cannot modify the contents. Any user can read and change your files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 4, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box
  3. Click to clear the Allow network users to change my files check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Read
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Read
Level 5: Shared on the network (Read and Write) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); This level is the most available and least secure access level. Any user (local or remote) can read, write, change, or delete a file in a folder shared at this access level. We recommend that this level be used only for a closed network that has a firewall configured. All local users including the Guest account can also read and modify the files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 5, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Change
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Full Control
Note All NTFS permissions that refer to Everyone include the Guest account.

All the levels that this article describes are mutually exclusive. Private folders (Level 1) cannot be shared unless they are no longer private. Shared folders (Level 4 and 5) cannot be made private until they are unshared.

If you create a folder in the Shared Documents folder (Level 3), share it on the network, and then allow network users to change your files (Level 5), the permissions for Level 5 are effective for the folder, the files in that folder, and the subfolders. The other files and folders in the Shared Documents folder remain configured at Level 3.

Jul 20, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

2 Answers

I need to control the peer to peer network clients?


hi

you can use a proxy software, to limit the bandwidth usage, if that is what you meant. a very simple and user friendly proxy software is CCPROXY.

kind regards

Mar 11, 2009 | Southwestern Bell (S60802)

1 Answer

Network access denied


Follow the steps to Sharing the files

Your computers are already connected to a network — i.e., they’re all already able to browse the Internet using the same router..

1 : Open the Network and Sharing Center window by clicking on the Windows orb in the lower left corner, and then either right-clicking on Network and selecting “Properties”, or opening the Control Panel and double-clicking “Network and Sharing Center.
2 : If your network type is “Public,” you need to change it to “Private”:
  1. To the right of the network name and location type, click Customize.
  2. In the Set Network Location dialog box, click Private, and then click Next.
  3. In the Successfully set network settings dialog box, click Close.
3 : Under “Sharing and Discovery” in the bottom half of the Network and Sharing Center window, you need to turn all the settings from “Off” to “On” by clicking on the down arrow next to each setting, clicking on “Turn on …”, and clicking on “Apply.” But see some pointers below:
  1. For the “Password protected sharing” setting: you may want to leave this “On” or turn “Off” at your discretion. (I turned mine off.)
  2. For the “Public folder sharing” setting:
    1. If you want to share the public folder so that other computers on the network can access the Public share to open files, but not create or change files, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can open files. This is the default setting.
    2. But if you want to share the public folder so that other computers on the network can access the Public share to open files and also create or change files, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can open, change, and create files.
4 : You’re done with the Network and Sharing Center window. Close it via the “X” button.
5 : Click the Windows orb at the lower left corner of your computer, and click on Computer
6 :
n the Computer window, navigate to the folder containing the file(s) or folder(s) that you want to share — e.g., “Pictures” or “Documents” or a specific file or folder within. Note: don’t open the folder itself that you want to share — just navigate to the folder that contains this folder.
7 : Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Share. The File Sharing window is displayed. (Click picture for a larger version.)
8 : If you have password protected sharing enabled: Use the File Sharing window to select which users can access the shared folder and their permission level. To allow all users, select Everyone in the list of users. By default, the permission level for a selected user is Reader. Users cannot change files or create new files in the share. To allow a user to change files or folders or create new files or folders, select Co-owner as the permission level.
9 : If you have password protected sharing disabled (like I do): Click the drop-down arrow inside the blank field in the File Sharing window, and select the Guest or Everyone account. Click “Add.” Then for that new account, click on the down arrow under “Permission Level” to change it to Co-owner (if you want anybody to read and modify files) or leave it at “Reader” (if you want other computers to just read but not modify your files).
10 : Click “Share”, then “Done.”


CRITICAL NOTE: If you selected “Everyone” when sharing a folder, you’re also making its contents available to any computer that joins this network. Many households, including mine, have wireless Internet via a wifi router. If you don’t have WEP encryption turned on, then I could just drive up and park on the street near your home, open my laptop, let it join your network via your wifi, and then nose around through your files. It’s particularly important that you have WEP encryption turned on for your wifi network.
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Feb 18, 2009 | SAMTRON 55V 15" CRT Monitor

3 Answers

Vista Laptop cannot connect to XP users


go to control panel>>add and remove prgrams>>click on add/reomve windows components on the left panel.
make sure you have the system CD.
put a check mark in "networking services" and "other network files and print services" install the addtional services.
check the share volume, make sure you have given the user rights to access the drive.

Jan 30, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

File sharing


it is possible

If you have multiple computers in your home and they are connected through a home network, you can share files among your computers. That means you no longer have to copy files to a floppy disk or USB flash drive to transfer them to another computer. Once you configure your computer to share files, you (or another user with the appropriate permissions) can, by using Windows Explorer, open them from other computers connected to the network, just like you’d open files that are stored on a single computer. You can also choose to have folders visible—but not modifiable—from other computers on the network.
To share files on your computer with other computers on a network, you need to:
Share a folder on your computer. This will make all of the files in the folder available to all the computers on your network (you can’t share individual files).
Set up user accounts on your computer for everyone who needs to connect to your shared folder. If any of the accounts are Limited User accounts (unless an account is a Computer Administrator account, it is a Limited User account), follow the steps in Set permissions for files and folders to enable them to open your files.

To access shared files that are on another computer on your network, you need to:
• Connect to the shared folder from other computers on the network. This procedure is described in Map a network drive.

Note: By default, file permissions only allow your user account and administrators on your local computer to open your files, regardless of whether a person is sitting at your keyboard or at another computer. It may help to keep these three things in mind when setting up file sharing:
• Files have user permission settings.
• Every computer has its own user database.
• Some accounts are administrator accounts and some aren’t.

Configure your computer to share files To share a folder on your computer so that files stored in the folder can be accessed from other computers on your home network
1.
Log on to your computer as an administrator. For more information, see Access the administrator account from the Welcome screen.
2.
Click Start, and then click My Documents.
68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security.
68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
4.
If you see a message that reads, As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer, click the Network Setup Wizard link. Then follow the instructions in How to set up your computer for home networking. On the File and printer sharing page of the Network Setup Wizard, be sure to select Turn on file and printer sharing. If you do not see this message, skip this step and go to step 5.
68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
5.
In the Properties dialog box, select the Share this folder on the network check box.
68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
If you want to be able to edit your files from any computer on your network (instead of just being able to open them without saving any changes), select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
Click OK.
68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
To connect to the shared folder from another computer, follow the steps described in How to map a network drive.
Note: By default, only you and other people with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder will be able to open your files. To limit access of specific users with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder, read How to set permissions for files and folders.

Aug 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

Wireless network between vista & xp


Open Windows Explorer, and then locate the drive or folder you want to share. Right-click the drive, and then click Sharing and Security. To open Windows Explorer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer. To change the name of your folder on the network, type a new name for your folder in the Share name text box. This will not change the name of the folder on your computer. To allow other users to change the files in your shared folder, select the Allow other users to change my files check box.

Oct 06, 2007 | Computers & Internet

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