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The amp will turn on but will not pick up sound on any microphone

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How to load microphone on my acer?


Not sure what you are asking.
Microphone socket is usually on the left-hand side of the laptop next to the earphone socket.
If you want to know how to turn the microphone on (as it is normally on mute), go to the control panel and pick sound icon.
You can turn on the microphone from there.

Aug 09, 2014 | Acer Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How do I get my blue snowball microphone to pick up more sound?


Read this...it might help you figure a few things out.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SnowballBK?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PPC&utm_campaign=none&gclid=CN2AzMiZ4bQCFQSf4Aodd1MAxg

Jan 07, 2013 | Blue Microphones Snowball Professional...

1 Answer

MY MICROPHONE DOESNT WORK


Go to Hardware and Sound in Control Panel, choose Manage Audio Devices, select Recording, click on Microphone and test the microphone built into your computer. If the results are unsatisfactory, buy an external (USB) microphone and plug it in.

Sep 19, 2012 | Toshiba Tecra A3 Notebook

1 Answer

My microphone isent working on my laptop i plug a mic in and nuthen can be picked up


Using a microphone with computer

To use any microphone with your computer you will need to enable it in control panel. The following instructions are for Windows XP but are broadly similar for Vista and Win7


Click START, CONTROL PANEL, SOUNDS & AUDIO DEVICES


Click VOICE


In Sounds & Audio Devices Properties window locate SOUND PLAYBACK box. Click the VOLUME button. Make sure that there is not a check-mark in the MUTE box against microphone in the list of devices and that the volume slider is at the top of the scale.


Make sure the MUTE ALL box isn't checked before closing the window.


Now click the VOLUME button in the SOUND RECORDING BOX. Here SELECT microphone as an input source for recording (as opposed to un-checking mute in the playback controls).


NOTE if your microphone is not listed in the 2 sets of volume controls click OPTIONS, PROPERTIES on the tool-bar and place a check against microphone in the list entitled 'show the following volume controls' and then click OK. Same applies for Internal mic.


That should be it.


To adjust audio volume generally.

Under VOLUME tab adjust Device Volume as necessary. Also (under Loudpeaker Settings) click Speaker Volume and adjust slider to suit.


You might put a check mark in the box to show the volume control on the Task Bar so you can go straight to it to make adjustments in the future.

Mar 22, 2011 | Thomson M140 Microphone

2 Answers

PGX4 receiver/PGX2 bodypack/WL93 lavalier>> mic


Unfortunately, it is nearly impossible to troubleshoot this over email. I suggest calling Shure at 800-516-2525. They can help you trouble shoot the problem. Make certain you have the wireless system with you when you call them.

Feb 04, 2011 | Shure PGX-2 Wireless Handheld Microphone...

1 Answer

Hi, i would like to buy some sharp microphones, two for lead singers and 6 for musician. can you give me some advice on what types i should get?


Hello
microphones broadly fall into 2 distinct types
  1. Condenser - requires a power source either a battery inside the microphone itself or remote 'phantom power' usually provided from a p.a. mixer.
  2. Dynamic - do not require a power source. Most famous of all is the Shure SM57 (instrument / vocals) and SM58 (lead vocals) used by many musicians and singers around the world.
Condenser microphones are used extensively in recording studios because they are very sensitive and have a better range than dynamic mics. However they are a bit fragile and good ones are expensive. There are plenty of cheap condenser microphones about but they give a rather tinny sound.
If you want the microphones for general band work, especially gigging you will get better value for money with dynamic microphones. These are much less sensitive that condenser mics and are intended for close up work - no more than a few inches from the mouth of the singer (use a pop shield to prevent unwanted noises) or hung close in to an instrument.
There are also 3 different pick-up patterns for microphones. Which ones you go for will depend on the use for which they are intended.
  1. Cardoid - cone shaped directional pick up pattern. These will only pick up sound from in front of the microphone in a cone shape of about 60 degrees. Suitable for general vocals and instruments. Good resistance to feedback. To effectively mic-up a big instrument like a piano you may need to use more than one mic.
  2. Hyper Cardoid - as above but with a much narrower pic-up sone - a cone of about 30 degrees. These are very good for lead vocals as you can drive them a bit harder without risk of feedback or picking up other instrument sounds on the stage (particularly useful if you have a singer who plays an a loud acoustic instrument or a keyboard with built in speakers). THese are okay for using to mike-up an instrument where the sound comes from a small fixed point (saxophone, violin, trumpet, acoustic guitar - provided that the musician stands still) but not much good for larger instruments like pianos or harps. They are also good for mike-ing guitar amps, but only if they don't have a separate tweeter.
  3. Omni-Directional . These will pick up sound from all around. Whilst they can be good for picking up large acoustic instruments or choirs they are very prone to feedback and are not really suitable for public address purposes.
Don't be tempted to buy cheap microphones with permanently fitted cables, especially ones with a standard 6mm jack-plug. Always go for mikes with a balanced (3 pin xlr) cable as they do not pick up as much radio interference on the cable (but only provided your mixer/amp also has balanced inputs too).
Although many professionals swear by the Shure SM57 and SM58 mics mentioned above I personally prefer the AKG D55 a hyper-cardoid which has a longer pick-up range and higher output than the Shures (useful if musicians or singers hang back a bit from the mic) and usually slightly cheaper too. It is really good for lead vocals but makes a good instrument mic too with a nice crisp but warm sound across the frequency range.
For larger instruments, or two backing singers sharing a mike, I use the standard cardoid version of the same AKG (but I'm afraid I can't remember the model number now).
If you want to mike up drums that is another subject all together.

Jan 31, 2011 | Sharp Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

My my sound really low not picking up sound well


Make sure you are using headphones and turn up the system volume so you don't get feedback.

Jan 04, 2011 | M-Audio Producer USB Microphone with...

1 Answer

Microphone does not pick up any sound


Your mike requires a 48 volt phantom power supply which your preamp should be supplying. The most commonly overlooked problem is the cable. It must be wired for a balanced connection for phantom power to work correctly. 1=ground/shield, 2=hot(ve) and 3=cold(ve). None of these connections should be bridged to another and need to be kept separate to maintain a balanced connection. You will need to eliminate the preamp and mike cable as sources of the problem in order to determine if the mike is working correctly. You need to test this combination with a volt /ohm meter. If you don't know how to do this you should take it to the dealer you bought it from for testing or advice.

Oct 15, 2009 | M-Audio Luna Professional Microphone

1 Answer

Inputs


ok, heres what try contacting the support line on your samson mic and ask the setup if you are going to connect an acoustic guitar, there might be some info for it. actually there is here check this out

Acoustic Guitar
There are a variety of ways that the G Track can be used to mic an acoustic guitar. The
microphone placement will depend on the type of instrument and what kind of sound
you’re looking to capture, for example the tonal quality you want to focus on, and how
much finger slide or pick noise you may or may not want. When miking a standard
steel string acoustic, a good place to start is with the microphone positioned pointing
towards the end of the fingerboard at a distance of about 6 inches to 2 feet away from
the instrument. You can experiment by moving the microphone slightly in the direction
of the sound hole, which will produce more low frequencies, or move it in the direction
of the fingerboard to capture more high-end or to remove any unwanted boominess.
For nylon string acoustic, try positioning the microphone above the bridge to emphasize
more of the attack from the sound of the finger picking, or for less, move the mic closer
to the sound hole. If you have a pair of G Tracks, try one positioned at the fingerboard
and the second over the sound hole.

Jun 04, 2008 | Samson G-TRACK USB RECORDING MICROPHONE...

1 Answer

Microphone Feedback


Turn the volume down, even if it's off.
The laptop picks up on anything near it, not necessarily audible sound.

Dec 05, 2007 | IBM ThinkPad T22 2647 Notebook

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