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How do you set camera for backlighting, for example shooting a subject inside with light coming through the window which would make the subject dark but has clear background. I have a Canon A95 digital.

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Backlighting settings are generally found on video cameras, not still cameras. The trick is to turn on the cameras flash, forcing it to fire. This will ensure your subject is correctly lit.

Matt

Posted on Aug 14, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Digital camera won't focus


I see your camera has a focus area. If you have a subject with enough contrasting parts in this area, the focusing should work fine.
You must know that not every subject can be focused on as quick or as good as you would like. If there are little contrasting lines in the subject, or when it is getting dark or there are dark and light parts in the focus area, that don't belong together, every camera can have problems to focus correct. Changing the ISO settings won't change anything for the auto focus.
But special when you try to shoot in almost dark places, you camera will have lots of work to focus and in most cases it won't work at all.

You could try to place an object with light and dark lines, on the same distance as the object you want to picture. Then by pressing the shutter half, when focusing on the object with much contrast, you can look if the camera can focus. If it is in focus, keep the shutter pressed half way down, while moving to the object you want to shoot a picture of. Once you have every thing in the frame as you want it, press the shutter complete.

Dec 27, 2013 | Vivitar Vivicam 5388 Digital Camera

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Bad pictures on my Digital Camera


A digital camera is a wonderful device - it's just not as good as the human eye yet.
Some things to watch out for:

Spots in the picture - Shiny surfaces reflect your flash back to you.
Picture is dark - Bright Window behind your subject - . Use backlight setting.
Bad focus - Subject is not in the middle of the picture. (Use focus lock if you have it)
Colours don't look right - Sunlight in a building with overhead fluorescents.The camera does not know to use the fluorescent light setting. Set it.
Picture is clear but dark on an overcast day - sport setting is ON or the ISO is too fast. Use auto, 100 or 200.
Flash won't flash and subject comes out dark - light behind subject. Set the flash to 'Always' for this picture.

Do's and Don'ts
Don't drop the camera. USE the hand/neck strap.
Don't store pictures on your memory stick - make copies as soon as you can.
Don't make changes to pictures with your computer while they are on the memory stick. Work with copies on your computer.
Do not allow rain to land on the camera - rain easily runs inside.
If you use rechargable batteries - have two or more sets. Use one set until they are used up, then switch. Charge the low battery only. This maximizes the battery life and provides the longest operating time.
Clean the battery contacts in the camera two or three times a year with 99% pure alcohol and a cotton swab. It does not hurt to clean the ends of rechargeable batteries at the same time. Don't touch batteries on their ends.

on Mar 29, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

What is the best setting for inside photos


That depends on what you want the photos to say to the viewer.
If all the subjects are about the same distance from the camera then you can use the flash. If they're not, like people at a long table, then the flash will blow out the nearer people while leaving the distant ones in the dark. You also wouldn't want to use the flash for a scene at a candlelight dinner or by a fireplace.
If there isn't much light then you'll need to set the ISO higher. How much higher depends on the amount of light and the amount of digital noise you're willing to accept. Also the shutter speed may get long so you might want to consider a tripod or other stable support.
The white balance should be set to match the light. You can usually get by on auto, but it'll be worthwhile trying the other settings.
As I said originally, the settings depend on what you want the photos to say. Shooting a lunch party in a room with large windows is different from shooting an intimate dinner by candlelight. Do you have anything specific in mind?

May 04, 2013 | Samsung Digimax Pro 815 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Been shooting with my Pentax *IST DL on “AUTO PICT” and “AF” for the last few weeks with no problem. (with and without the flash.) As of yesterday however, anything I shoot is coming out dark. Even with...


1. Clean the contacts on the camera body and lens where they meet with a cotton swab lightly dampened with rubbing alcohol. 2. Go into the menu and find "reset" to go back to the original factory default settings. 3. If you have a second lens, does the same problem occur?

Sep 13, 2010 | Pentax *ist DL Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a Canon 5D and a 430EX flash. When shooting pictures my flash will delay way to long before I can shoot another picture with flash. One picture is good and 3 are dark. My flash card is a...


The 430ex flash is E-TTL, that means it adapts is power to the scene. If you shoot a scene at 10 meters, the flash will choose to flash at the max power, and will take time to recharg. Try to get closer to your subject, and remember that the flash can only lighting your subject, not the whole scene.

Dec 14, 2008 | Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

1 Answer

The Camcorder


it work 100%nice outdoor shooting in daylight.
I think u have to use another small flash light in indoor in the insufficient light.
I did that and got good result.

Jan 16, 2008 | DigiLife DDV-C330 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Fill flash/ flash setting for backlit


Set up the flash
When ready to shoot point camera to a dark area[the ground?] and press the release HALF WAY- holding it there point camera at subject and shoot.

Oct 03, 2007 | Nikon COOLPIX S200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shooting modes


The shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM (P)/AUTO Modes. Used for general photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. In PROGRAM AUTO (P) the brightness (exposure compensation) can be adjusted. Portrait. Suitable for taking a portrait-style photo of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings to produce natural skin tones. Landscape + Portrait. Suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the landscape. This setting allows both the foreground subject and background landscape to be in focus. Landscape. Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings to produce vivid blues and greens. Night and Portrait. Suitable for taking photos of your subject in the evening or at night. Since the shutter speed is slow, it is advised that you use a tripod to support the camera in this mode to help avoid blur from camera shake. Night Scene. Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both foreground subjects and the background. It is advised that you use a tripod to support the camera in this mode to help avoid blur from camera shake. Sports. Suitable for capturing fast moving action without blurring. Even a fast moving object will appear to be stationary. Self Portrait. Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens toward yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. Movie Mode. Enables you to take a QuickTime movie.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus D-630 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Several shooting modes


The Shooting modes are as follows: Program Auto (Factory default setting) Used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering can be adjusted manually. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the Wide position and cannot be changed. Portrait + Landscape Portrait + Landscape mode is suitable for taking photos which include both your subject and the landscape. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus D-575 Zoom Digital Camera

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