Question about Canon PowerShot SD500 / IXUS 700 Digital Camera

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I have double image on binoculars and left eye is dim.

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Hard to guess whats wrong, sounds like the left side prism has shifted, best to send to a qualified tech.if its a cheapo really wouldnt be worth cost to repair. let tech know what model you have before wasting time. good luck....www.reichinstruments.com

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

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You get this if you happen to drop the binocs. prism alignment disturbed. once adjusted will get single and sharp image.

Posted on Aug 13, 2008

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

One image is slightly above the other at all distances. After using the binoculars for even a couple of moments, my eyes are strained. The problem was present when the binoculars were purchased, however...


The oculars are not aligned properly causing double vision. Check on the binoculars to see if there is a place to adjust the alignment of either of the oculars. Look for any loose screws that may cause the two oculars to be out of alignment.
If this is not the case try adding some torque to the binoculars to see if the will adjust to where they will both point in the same direction. The eyes can fuse disparate images slightly but there is a very small range that they can handle. If the two images are separated by more than this small amount it will cause eye strain and double vision.

Feb 13, 2011 | Minolta 10x25 Activa D WP XL Pocket...

1 Answer

I have a pair of Plastimo military binoculars which have been fine up to now, but suddenly, despite being able to focus using the two eye piece controls, I cannot get anything other than a double image, no...


Hello - I never had Plastimo before but I have had a similar problem with double vision on a very similar looking pair of binoculars.
The eye piece movement just re-aligns eye focus differences , a double image usually means one of the lenses has moved inside the main tube. (usually from a knock/fall etc)
Can you rotate either one of the tubes ? On my pair I had to rotate anti-clockwide and found a prism inside that had slipped after a fall -
Close one eye and try to gauge which side is the best side -- Ray

Feb 05, 2011 | Plastimo Optics

2 Answers

Seeing double when I look with both eyes. Out of


Step 1.
Adjust the eyepiece or both if both are adjustable back to zero. It should be printed on there. If it's not, then halfway. To find halfway turn them to one end, count the number of turns like 1 and a half turns for example, and then half that atnd turn it that ammount. You've now reset the binoculars to zero.

Step 2.
Now to focus. Pick your target that you want to look at thoguh your binoculars. Look through the binoculars and close the eye with the adjustable eyepiece or your right eye if both are eadjustable and focus the image on the left eye with the central focus knob. Once you've got it focused close the left eye, open the right eye and if it's not in focus adjust the EYEPIECE focus, not the central one, until it's in focus.
If you can't get it in focus because the eyepiece focus won't turn far enough in one direction, turn the OTHER eyepiece in the opposite direction at max, start the process again from step 2.

If it's all ok now you need to adjust the distance between the eyepieces. Open the binoculars as far as they go, look through the binoculars with both eyes on the target and move the binoculars inward slowly until you remove any black edges around the image, then move them very slowly inward until you see only one image.

If you've got more problems come back as ask. :-)

Nov 27, 2009 | Vector Audubon 8x42 Binoculars

1 Answer

I am seeing a double image whel I look through my binocular.


Hi,

Most binoculars should allow you to grip the two sides and pull them closer together to fit the distance between your eyes.. Have you tried this?
What you should see is the two images come together to form one.

If you have tried this already and you still get the two images then it's possible the model is just too wide for your eyes.. If they're new you could try return them for another type that fit better..

If this works for you then here are the instructions for setting up the binoculars to give you the best result for your eyesight..


This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Oct 20, 2009 | Sharper Image Optics

1 Answer

I bought these for my husband. In trying them


Difficult to answer specifically without knowing the model. But binoculars are designed to view objects in the distance. They all have a limit as to how close they will focus based on the magnification and design. Objective lenses that are far apart such as on a porro prism binocular will not focus very close. The nature of the design of having the objectives further apart than the eyepieces doesn't allow it. When trying to focus too close the image will appear blurred and double. That is the nature of the design. 9 feet or 3 metres is considered quite close to focus a binocular and is usually for a model designed to do this such as a roof prism where the objective lens and the eye lenses are inline. A specialty binocular such as the Pentax Papilo will close focus to 50 centimeters. It has been designed so that the objective (large lenses) lenses converge.

Take into account when focusing that binoculars are also designed to compensate for differences in each eye. One of the eyepieces either right or left will adjust seperately. For binoculars with a center focus ring. First focus using the center ring with one eye covered. The eye that should be covered is the one that doesn't have the adjusting eyepiece. When the image is clear close the eye you have just used and leave the center focus alone. Focusing on the same spot look through the eyepiece that adjusts and turn the eyepiece ring until the image is clear. Now all you have to do is focus using the center ring only as the binoculars are adjusted for each eye.

Some binoculars do not have a center focus and each eye will adjust seperately.

Jul 29, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

How to focus my Zeiss 10x40B TP binoculars


Your binoculars are known as the Zeiss Classic or what was once known as the Dialyt. They focus differently from the usual binoculars like those mentioned. The rear wheel is to focus both binocular barrels while using them. The front focus wheel is adjust the right eyepiece to suit your right eye. Binocular manufacturers take into account each eye is slightly different. To focus the Dialyt...First close your right eye and turn the rear wheel until the image is sharp in the left barrel. Leave the focus wheel alone. Now close left eye and adjust the front wheel until the image is sharp for your right eye. The image should now be clear and in focus for both eyes. It should not be needed to use the front wheel from now on. The rear wheel is what you will use to change the focus from near to far objects.

May 31, 2009 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

1 Answer

Image appears double and slighly off when viewing


I was having a double vision problem with my Barska 10-30X50 zoom, 195FT/100YDS binoculars. One image was always higher than the other. This was tolerable at low zoom, but was further aggravated the more I zoomed in. I found that I could grasp both barrels and twist them in opposite directions (one side up, the other side down) and force the two images to merge--but that was a strain and an unpleasant viewing experience. As an experiment, while looking through the binoculars, I grasped the far end of the right barrel and twisted it on its axis. Nothing happened at first, but after a certain amount of resistance it began to rotate independently of the body. Lo and behold, this shifted the barrel's axis, and the image for that eye moved vertically! I turned it until the two images merged, and now I'm thrilled to say that the problem is solved! I don't have a clue if this would work on any other brand or model, but it's worth a try!

Apr 06, 2009 | Tasco Sonoma 16-840WA-1 (8x40MM) Binocular

1 Answer

Double Vision


Your glasses have had a hard drop or jar- they are out of colluminatiom send them to Deusch Optics in Nevada

Jul 31, 2008 | Oberwerk (OBERWERK1030X60ZOOM) Binocular

2 Answers

Focusing problems


Hello Samaro,

This effect is produced when the tho sides of the binoculars are not focusing the same.
Since you sayit is present at long distance, it might be that one barrel is stuck and is not focusing the same as the otherone when you scroll the middle "focuser".

What you can do is open it up and try to clean it, also see if there is something, that is making one of the lenses not move forward as far as the other one.

Good luck,
Dahaka

Jul 28, 2008 | Fujinon CD Binocular

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