Question about Harley Davidson Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Desktop Telephone

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Harley I saw you post to benmuir in the experts lounge that you were considering a Harley. I've owned many over the years, and worked for a dealership in the past. Maybe I can point you in the right direction. What are you thinking bout getting, and what's your price range? Cash or finance? Also wondering where you are located, I'm in Joplin, MO. My current bike: 1995 FXSTC Softail custom.

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  • Ryan Rogers
    Ryan Rogers Aug 12, 2008

    Thanks, I'm proud of it, I like the way this one turned out. I get an idea of what direction I want to go with a bike, and I've got to say that some haven't quite turned out as I envisioned them.



    Now for advice on purchase, this will probably get a little long winded.



    First off, buy used from an individual, never buy from a dealership. I've worked at dealerships and you won't get half the bike for the money. You might consider making a southern road trip to California. When I worked for a Harley dealership in San Diego, we had alot of customers from Oregan and Washington, apparently you can get out or save on the sales tax by buying in CA. Not to mention that there is a ton of bikes, especially in southern CA, because of the weather. I've been back in Missouri for 8 years now, and been to CA three times buying bike. Once for mw, once for a Friend, and once to end up buying 9 bikes for resale here in MO. The seasonal weather in MO makes for fewer bikes and higher resale values. When buying a Harley, you're going to want to consider the different classes/types, Sportster, Dyna, Softail, and FLH or cruiser/bagger. The Sportster is the cheapest by far, it's smaller and not good for long distances or carrying passengers, and the resale value isn't as good as the bigger bikes. You'll probably out grow a Sportster rather fast. The Dyna has the big engine and comes in a narrow, mid, and wide glide font end. The narrow glide front is like the Sportster and except for the engine has the same qualities. The mid glide is sportier, a bit larger, and rides better on trips and with a passenger. The wide glide is almost identical to a Softail custom or standard. It considerably bigger, handles great, good for distances, and rides a passenger well. The Dyna's still don't have a great resale, but you can get a very nice Dyna for a low price because of this. I like the Dyna Wide Glide, it's a good bike, and handles superbly. In my opinion, the Dyna is the best handling Harley when it comes to sticking in the curves and riding hard or aggressively. Then you have the Softail's. These are the best looking bike, but the worst handling. Softials come in the Standard, Custom, and a couple of other special edition versions, which is the look with the forward controls and bob tail rear fender. The Fatboy, which is self explanatory, everybody knows the Fatboy, and the Heritage, which is the nostalgic old school line. These have a very good resale, but along with the handling, don't ride overly well, a bit rough. They are for looking good, and this is where you start getting into a little higher price. Mine is a 1995 Softail custom, I got a good deal for $8000 in 2005 for it. Then you have the FLH models. these are the big cruisers with bags, shields/fairing, radios, the whole 9 yards, very nice, and the most expensive. The handle good, ride great, and are made for comfort.



    I would recommend the Dyna. A Dyna would make you a great starter and keeper bike, especially the Wide Glide. Plus with the mid range resale on these, you can get a really, really nice bike for around $9000. Like I said, long winded, I could talk bikes all day. If you have any questions, or need an opinion on a bike you find, let me know.

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I'm in Seattle. Financing is going to be a pain in the **** right now. I'm taking on another PT job after my full time job so that might be a possible way to get the funding saved up.



I like that bike.

Posted on Aug 11, 2008

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