Question about LG LHT734 System

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Subwoofer problem so every thing works but the subwoofer so i tried connecting the wire to the right input and its silent

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  • Anonymous Aug 23, 2008

    yes i have the same problem

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I have the same problem. I tried to get it fixed by sending it to my retailer (Best Buy) who then sent it to the LG company and they said everything was fine. But there was one problem with their diagnostic...it wasn't. The subwoofer worked fine when i originally bought it, but about a month later it would not work or it would work intermittently. It literally takes about an hour for this thing to start working, and now my right speaker has started to not work. My judgment is that this product is poorly made and the service people at LG are incompetent!

Posted on Oct 15, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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My panasonic says f61 when i switch it on wat do i do


An F61 error occurs on a Panasonic home theater system when the speaker cable wire connections are wrong. This situation is likely to happen if you just purchased your unit or moved the system and try to reconnect the speakers again. Polarity is key in a successful setup. The positive and negative ends of the cable wires must match the input of the main unit. Retrace your speaker wire connections to clear error F61.
Step 1 Attach the speaker labels to the speaker wires for easier identification, if they're not already labeled. At minimum, labels for front left (L), front right (R) and center speakers should be included in the packaging contents that came with your system.
Step 2 Verify that the white ends of each speaker cable are connected to the corresponding "+" positive inputs for each speaker.
Step 3 Verify that the blue ends of each speaker cable are connected to the corresponding "-" negative inputs for each speaker.
Step 4 Push the plastic ends of the speaker wires on each speaker to verify that each is locked into place.
Step 5 Connect the remaining end of the "Front (L)" speaker wire to the white terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 6 Connect the remaining end of the "Front (R)" speaker wire to the red terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 7 Connect the remaining end of the "Center" speaker wire to the green terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 8 Connect the remaining end of the "Subwoofer" wire to the purple terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 9 Connect the remaining ends of the "Surround (R)" and "Surround (L)" speakers to the wireless system.

Sep 11, 2016 | Panasonic Audio Players & Recorders

Tip

How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Marantz SR870 tuner not working


Hello,
Make sure your FM antena connection is good. A receiver will not pick up an FM signal without an antena. Even a small piece of wire will work to test. If the Tuner section is bad, an external tuner can always be connected to an Aux input. Due to cost, it may not be cost effective to repair this unit.
Hope this helps.

Oct 08, 2009 | Marantz Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

No sound from base speaker


(Please read the whole thing before opening anything)
Loose connections inside either the receiver or the subwoofer. Open the subwoofer case (the screen should pop off, if there is no screen there is usually some hidden screws somewhere) and see if there are any wires that have been separated. The problem with subwoofers (more common in car audio) is that they will vibrate so much that when you have something meant to have a lot of bass without the subwoofer and then you add the subwoofer to it, it's overpowering it which causes it to vibrate harder; seperating the cord that attaches the fabric of the speaker itself to the metal harness.
You can do one of 2 things:
1) Souder the wires back together using a heat sink.
2) Get allagator clips, cut them down pretty short and just extend the length of the wires a little bit giving it more bouncing room. Caution with this because if you dont cover the clips and they touch the metal frame, you will have no sound. Electric tape them once they're on.
If nothing is seperated, check the input jacks from the speaker box frame to the speaker itself. Loose connections are common for the crimp on kind.
Also a good idea: if you really (I mean really) want bass and you have no neighbors within a 1/4 mile radius of your house, have a friend who is getting rid of his car woofers to hook you up an AC outlet from the power source, and then use the red and white cables going into the amp to come from your receiver. I've seen this and it's great when watching a movie or playing games. Surrounding people hate it. (Wonder why?)

Jun 13, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Sound from 3 channels only


Sometimes what happens is that people r just confused with all wirings.Considering that you have connected the speakers correctly...Now according to u the center speaker is not working
  1. If u have a jack attached at the end of the speakers then try connecting the center speaker jack into the Right front/Right Rear/Left Rear socket at the back of the reciever.Just to make sure that your speakers r fine.
  2. Secondly play an audio cd first,sumtimes a video DVD not being 5.1 channel one confuses a lot.
  3. Assuming that you have checked the center speaker,like I asked u too,Connect it into its proper socket or better connect all the speakers.
  4. Now with the remote you check the predefined equalizer in it n keep changing that [pop,rock,jazz etc] or you might even want it to change it to 5.1 from a 3channel or 2channel Stereo.Everytime you change it listen to every speaker.
  5. Also check that you have increased all the speakers volume one-by-one.
  6. Disconnect any headphones attached.
  7. Switch on the selected source or select another source.
For further details u can check the manual.
The VGA cable of the monitor will work fine.

Jun 03, 2009 | Philips HTS3450 System

2 Answers

Subwoofer with speaker wire?


Back in the old days, subwoofers were powered by the voltage from your receiver, through speaker wire.
Nowadays, subwoofers have their own power, hence not having speaker wire connections anymore.
It's unlikely that you'll be able to connect your old subwoofer to your new receiver.
You'd need to get a new one, which if you don't mind buying closeout, can be found on eBay pretty cheap.

Mar 16, 2009 | Sony DAV-DX255 System

1 Answer

Sound from 3 channels only


Hi, first of all did you verify with the manual if it is possible to run a testsignal through all 5 channels?
One of the most common problems in this case is the basic settings of the device. If you don't have the manual, mostly you can download them from manufacturers website. Chances are that for some reason the setting is set 3.0 stereo (also known as 3channel sound) which is always the 2 fronts and the centre speaker.

Best thing to do it is take a DVD with THX on it and run the THX setup, it will send test signal to all channels.

Jan 15, 2009 | Philips HTS3450 System

2 Answers

Can't get all speakers to turn on in AV-1 function


can't seem to get the sound to come on. i knowe i have sound but will not turn on

Feb 09, 2007 | Amphion Mediaworks T-365 System

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