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Can I raise the handlebars? I can raise the saddle but the handlebars seem fixed?

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Http://www.sheldonbrown.com/handsup.html

Getting Riser Bars or simply flipping the stem over or getting one with a different rise and reach might give you the added height you need. If you LIKE the handlebars, the stem is the best option as most new ones come with front loaders (detachable front caps) that allow replacement without stripping components off one side of the handlebar. In minutes a Bicycle Shop could swap any number of them onto your bike for you to try.

Posted on Apr 11, 2011

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2 Answers

Move saddle forward


Undo the fixing bolts and the saddle will slide forward
Make sure to tighten it up

Mar 04, 2013 | Cannondale Cycling

1 Answer

Raise handlebars up 1"


Yeah, you'll most likely need to get a new stem with the rise. You can also get handlebars that have a rise to them. If your steering tube has space you can add some spacers under the stem but that seems pretty uncommon for a bike shop to assemble a bike with excess spacers on top of the stem.

Aug 12, 2012 | Trek 7.5 FX

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Can the handlebars be raised? If so, how?


The handlebars are in a fixed position, they cannot be raised.

May 21, 2011 | Diamondback Tess 20 Girls' FrontSuspension...

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Hello, I just bought a raleigh devon 27 with alu frame. I want to raise the "steering tub" since the handlebar is to low compare to the saddle. How is this done ? Thanks, Kjell


http://www.sheldonbrown.com/handsup.html


Getting Riser Bars or simply flipping the stem over or getting one with a different rise and reach might give you the added height you need. If you LIKE the handlebars, the stem is the best option as most new ones come with front loaders (detachable front caps) that allow replacement without stripping components off one side of the handlebar. In minutes a Bicycle Shop could swap any number of them onto your bike for you to try.


I would recommend you get used to the position that yields a careful compromise between aerodynamics and uprightness when needed.

Apr 01, 2011 | Raleigh Diamondback Men's Edgewood LX...

1 Answer

How do you raise the handlebars


There's a ring nut between the stem of the handlebars (The stem is the vertical part of the handlebars) and the frame of the bike where the handlebars connect into the frame. The handlebar stem goes down through the ring nut into the frame.

Loosen the ring nut and you'll be able to raise the handlebars. There's a mark on the handlebar stem which indicates the highest point that the handlebars can be raised to. If you raise it above this there won't be enough of it in the frame and this can cause the stem to break when pressure comes on it. Also when tightening the ring nut up again make sure you have the handlebars and front wheel lined up.

Jan 16, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

I cant seem to lift my mongoos bmx saddle. How do I do I?


Below the seat is a bracket on the neck of frame. There should be a lever that you pull and turn counter clockwise to loosen. Then you can raise and lower seat.

Jan 03, 2011 | Mongoose Bmx Bicycle Seat/saddle Part 269

1 Answer

Why does bike size is important?


It is clear that wearing a shirt two sizes too small would be uncomfortable, and wearing a shirt two sizes too large wouldn't be good either. In the same way, riding a wrong size bike will fit badly and make you uncomfortable, too. There are two main problems, one obvious and one a little more subtle.

The first big problem with a bike that doesn't fit is saddle height. You need the saddle to be just high enough to give your legs the right extension when you pedal. Too low and your legs stay bent too much all the way around; this doesn't use your leg muscles well and you wear out quickly. Too high and you rock back and forth on the saddle as you pedal, very uncomfortable. Either extreme (too high or too low) can also be very hard on your knees.

Saddle height is adjustable, of course, and if the bike frame is at least close to the right size, you'll be able to adjust the saddle to the proper height. If the frame is a lot too small, you can usually overcome this problem by buying a longer seatpost to move the saddle back up to where you want it. (But that causes other problems we'll talk about soon.) If the frame is much too large, you won't be able to drop the seat far enough to be usable, and there is no practical way around that problem.

The saddle on a bike can be adjusted up and down several inches, even as much as a foot if you consider replacing the original seatpost with a longer one. But the handlebars can't be moved nearly as far as saddles can. Most handlebars can be adjusted up and down or forward and back only two inches or so, and even this small change is often a complicated operation of replacing parts, not just loosening a few bolts.

This can lead to all sorts of problems. If the handlebar is too far away from the saddle, you have to bend down further and reach far out to grab the bars. This puts more weight on your back, arms and hands, which is uncomfortable. Having the handlebar too close to the saddle is less of a problem, but in extreme cases it can cause your knees to bump the handlebars when you are standing up to climb a hill. Having the handlebar a lot lower than the saddle is similar to having it too far away-you have to bend far over and reach further to grab the bars, an uncomfortable position. Having the handlebars high up is not a big problem, except that sitting upright slows you down. Your legs aren't as strong when you are sitting up, and that position causes more wind resistance when riding fast or into a wind.

Bike size has a big effect on handlebar position. If the frame is too small, you'll have to push the seat up high to fit your legs. You won't be able to move the handlebar up as much, so it will be a long reach back down to grab the bars, and your back will be quite bent over. If on the other hand the frame is too large, the bars will be up high but might be too far forward (since the frame gets longer as well as taller).

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

How bike size is measured?


So what does "different frame size" actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13" or 25" or whatever, mean? It's fairly simple.

The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

What size should I get?


A bike is the right size when your child can:

•Sit on the saddle and rest the balls of both feet on the ground.
•Straddle the top bar with a comfortable clearance and with both feet flat on the ground.
•Reach the handlebars with a slight bend in the arms when sitting on the seat. If there are handbrakes, your child should be able to grasp them and apply enough pressure to stop the bike.
•ByK bikes have more knee room than other bikes, which helps to lengthen the life of the bike and make the bike handle in a more predictable way.
As your child grows, you can raise the seat post and handlebar stem according to the owners manual limits.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

How size is measured? So what does “different frame size” actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13” or 25” or whatever, mean?


The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cycling

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