Question about Canon PowerShot A80 Digital Camera

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Bright white exposure

Whenver I take a picture outdoors on a sunny day, the picture that comes back is a completely white frame. I am not shooting into the sun but everything is overexposed to the point that image is solid white. Thanks!

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  • Anonymous Nov 29, 2008

    I have the same problem since 3 months! The pictures come all white.

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  • Master
  • 797 Answers

This may be a ccd problem.
See this link.
http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=PgComSmModDisplayAct&keycode=2112&fcategoryid=221&modelid=8776

Posted on Aug 24, 2008

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Too much brightness when using s6800


I do not know the S6800 model specifically however, nikon cameras all generally work in the same way. Somewhere on your camera, probably a button or in the menus, there is an exposure compensation setting. The symbol Nikon uses for the button is a "+/-" enclosed in a circle (often half black on white/white on black printing). Press the button and you will either see a zero, a positive or negative number or a a scale with zero in the center with positive numbers to the right and negative numbers to the left.
If the exposure compensation is not at zero, set it to zero. Your exposures should now be correct. If it is already at zero, set it to a negative number to reduce exposure and darken the picture and to a positive number to increase exposure and lighten the picture. Let me know if this solved your problem.

Jul 31, 2014 | Nikon COOLPIX S6800 Digital Camera Black

1 Answer

Pictures are too bright


My cemera outdoor picture come out bright/white on Canon PowerShot A470 but indoor picture and video picture comes out good. So kindly give me this proble suggession.

Nov 18, 2012 | Canon PowerShot A95 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Camera settings to shoot the moon


The best way is to set your camera to manual exposure and ignore the camera's light meter. The light meter will try to make the entire scene a middle gray, which will result in a gray sky with a blown-out moon.

There's an old rule-of-thumb called the "Sunny-16 Rule." This says that the proper exposure for a picture under a bright sun is f/16 at a shutter speed of 1/ISO seconds. So if you're shooting a daylight scene at ISO 200 then the proper exposure would be f/16 at 1/200 seconds or equivalent (such as f/11 at 1/400).

Why is this relevant? The moon is simply a large rock essentially at the same distance from the sun as any other landscape you've photographed. So start with f/16 at 1/ISO. Take a look at the result on the back of the camera. The sky will be completely black, but so what? It's the moon you want. Zoom in on it and see whether it looks the way you want it to. Adjust the exposure if necessary. Don't let it blow out to complete white.

May 28, 2012 | Cannon EOS 50D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hello, I would like my pictures to have a white background. When I take the picture on a white background the background ends up looking gray. I am taking pictures of baby clothing and I want the clothing...


Exposure meters are designed on the premise that the scene is an average, middle gray, in brightness. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray dog playing in gray snow). If you take a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray cat sitting on gray ground).

If the white background is dominating the scene, the camera will reduce exposure to try to make the entire scene come out middle gray. The solution is to meter on something else. Move in close and fill the frame with the subject, press the AE-LOCK button, then move back, compose the picture, and take the shot. For full details, refer to the "Shooting with the exposure locked --- AE-LOCK" section in the manual (page 52 in my copy).

If you're taking a lot of pictures, you might want to switch to Manual mode and set the exposure accordingly.

Dec 29, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F717 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Picture too dark


Do not confuse dark pictures with black pictures.
1. Flash Range
2. Exposure Compensation
3. Monitor Calibration (low monitor brightness)
4. Obstructed or covered flash
5. Obstructed or covered light sensor (only on certain models)
6. Flash not firing
Visit www.kodak.com/go/stepbystep
.
NOTE:
A normal sunny outdoor scene is a good way to test the exposure metering of the camera.

Nov 16, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare C875 Digital Camera

1 Answer

CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark


learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
once you confirm that you have these settings correct and still get a dark image, its time to have it serviced.
good luck
mark

Sep 01, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera...

2 Answers

Brightness


kindly provide me with contact details of your repair centre in New Delhi, India. I have fujifilm f420 finePix digital camera and facing problems inusing it.

Regards

Alok
alok.tanwar@gmail.com
09818000602

Sep 12, 2005 | Fuji FinePix F420 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four sequential modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the CAMERA menu: Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the DRIVE mode menu: Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the DRIVE mode menu: - Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. - High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. - AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. - Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5060 Wide Zoom Digital...

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