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Bottom bracket need replaced. needs a new crank set. what size if the bottom bracket and what size crank set is recommended, or does the bottom bracket need to come out to find the size. bought the bike in 1999.....does anyone know the size of the bracket?

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Impossible to tell you without knowing the bike brand and model and year, although you have provided that 1999.

If you take into a bike shop, which is the usual place to purchase the parts you need, they will be able to tell you what size Bottom Bracket will fit your bike, also what options you will have for replacement cranks and bottom bracket. This could be a very complicated issue when replacing with parts that are 11-12 years newer, the shop will be best equipped to give you all your options.

Posted on Apr 07, 2011

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Mongoose MGX DXR crank set replacement. How to determine what to buy online?


How about just go to the source (manufacturer)?
Mongoose Contact Us They may be able to give you the required specs, and perhaps sources. That being said, from pics I pulled up it appears to use a cartridge type bottom bracket (would need to know proper spindle length) probably a "square taper" type, and you would also need to specify crank length. Pedals are standard 9/16" - whatever style you want.

Depending on how much is missing (cranks, bottom bracket and pedals?) this could end up costing you quite a bit, so I hope you paid very little for the bike, which sold for less than $200 new, worth well under $100 used in rideable condition.

Jul 13, 2016 | Mongoose Cycling

Tip

How to Remove and Replace the Bottom Bracket on an Indoor Cycling Bike


Following is a basic guideline of removing and replacing the bottom bracket on an indoor cycling bike. Due to the different brands of indoor cycling bikes and designs for bottom brackets, the following should only be used as a guideline. If any of the information is not exact to the bike being serviced, refer to the service manual or call Sportsmith for further help.
Common Tools Needed:
Phillips Screw Driver
Set of Allen Wrenches (standard and metric)
Bottom Bracket Tool
Cotterless Crank Puller Tool
9/16" Socket
Ratchet Wrench
Pedal Wrench
Crescent Wrench
You will begin by removing the outside belt/chain guard by using either or both the Phillips screw driver and Allen wrenches. It may be necessary to remove the drive side pedal (using the pedal wrench) in order to completely remove the outside belt/chain guard.
Once the belt/chain guard is removed, you will need to remove the belt/chain. If the unit is belt driven, you can simply "walk" the belt off the pulley by pushing the belt to the outside while turning the crank backwards. **CAUTION: PINCH POINT ** If the unit is chain driven, most use a continuous chain that can be "walked" off the sprocket just like the belt. **CAUTION: PINCH POINT ** Some chains may use a connecting link and can be separated at the connecting link to remove the chain. The connecting link is different in appearance from all other chain links.
Now it is time to remove the crank arms. How to Use a Cotterless Crank Puller Tool
It works best to place the bike upside down for best leverage to remove the bottom bracket. (If placing the bike upside down, ensure proper seat adjustment for best bike balance.) Begin removing the bottom bracket from the drive side of the bike. This side has a reverse thread. You will need to turn right to loosen and remove the bottom bracket. Place the teeth of the bottom bracket tool into the teeth of the bottom bracket cup. Using the ratchet wrench or crescent wrench to turn the bottom bracket tool, you will turn right to loosen and remove the bottom bracket. (If removal of the bottom bracket is difficult, it helps to use a crescent wrench in combination with a bolt threaded into the bottom bracket shaft to hold the tool in place while applying pressure to break the bottom bracket loose.) Remove the bottom bracket from the frame. Remove the bottom bracket cup and/or lock ring from the non-drive side of the bike. This is a standard thread. You will turn left to loosen and remove this bottom bracket cup and/or lock ring.
Install the new bottom bracket from the drive side and tighten flush to the frame. Install the bottom bracket cup and/or lock ring to the non-drive side and tighten.
Re-install the crank arms and pedals. Make sure the crank arm bolts are tightened to the proper torque. If unsure of proper torque specs, refer to the equipment service manual or call Sportsmith.
Re-install the belt/chain onto the pulley/sprocket. If belt/chain was "walked" off the pulley for removal, it can be "walked" onto the pulley/sprocket by placing the belt or chain along the bottom of the pulley/sprocket. Carefully, turn the crank arm forward while lifting on the belt/chain. **CAUTION: PINCH POINT ** Continuing turning the crank forward until the belt/chain is in place.
Re-install the outside chain guard and test the unit. Ride the bike without tension and test with tension. Ensure functionality and feel of the ride. Make any adjustments if necessary


Removing and Replacing Bottom Bracket on Indoor Cycling Bike

on Mar 11, 2015 | Exercise & Fitness

Tip

Recommended Tools for an Indoor Cycling Tool Box


Video about the Recommended Tools for an Indoor Cycle Tool Box

  • This video will show what tools and products you will want to have in your tool box if you are working on indoor cycles
  • The tool kit shown in this video is a kit that you can buy from Sportsmith that has a lot of the tools you will need
    • They include but are not limited to:
      • Cotterless Crank Arm Extractor
      • 8MM Hex Wrench (for crank arm bolt removal on some cycles)
      • Six Inch Adjustable Wrench
      • Phillips and Flat head Screwdriver with Magnetic Tip (which can be quite handy in the field)
      • 14mm & 15mm Pedal Wrench (for installing and removing pedals)
      • Chain Break Tool
      • Chain Whip Tool
      • Bottom Bracket Tool
        • Something you might want to add to the kit is a 5/16"-24 x 2" bolt and several washers that you can use to install the tool on to the bottom bracket with. Then use another tool to loosen the bottom bracket by turning the bottom bracket tool
      • Set of Hex Wrenches
  • Sometimes you may find that you cannot get enough torque or the right size from the set of hex wrenches in the pre-packaged tool kit, so it's a good idea to have a set of the bits that will work with a 3/8" drive ratchet or for use with your torque wrench when setting torque on things
  • You may also want to include an ISIS style bottom bracket tool in your toolbox, which you can also use the bolt and washers with if needed
  • Some of the other tools you will need to have in your tool box:
    • Lock Ring Tool
    • Torque Wrench
      • We show both a click style and a needle and beam style torque wrench in the video
      • Either one will work, just be sure to consult the manual to get the torque specs for whatever you are setting torque on
    • A rubber mallet is also handy if something is locked up or jammed
    • A good pair of pliers and a set of locking pliers are also helpful at times
    • A chisel is sometimes needed to use with the rubber mallet to turn a rusty nut or bolt or to push out the pressed in bottom bracket bearings
    • You will want a wire brush for roughing up leather brake pads before applying oil or for removing rust from something
  • Some of the products we use and recommend are:
    • Stainless Steel Polish
    • Quick Shot Grease- from Schwinn- synthetic based, multi-service, non-melting waterproof grease
    • Tri-flow Penetrating Lube- loosens rusted parts, frees sticky mechanisms, washes away dirt, corrosion and contaminants
    • Clean Ride- use on cycle chains to prevent buildup of debris
      • Debris forms but flakes off over time instead of building up
    • Thread Locker- probably the most valuable product in the box- use on nuts and bolts or even bottom brackets that repeatedly come loose
    • 3-n-1 Oil- lubricates, stops rust, and protects metal
      • Used on leather brake pads to extend life
  • That pretty much covers what you should carry in your tool box to service indoor cycles

Video about Recommended Tools for an Indoor Cycle Tool Box

on Feb 25, 2015 | Exercise & Fitness

1 Answer

I need to replace the bottom bracket. What size bottom bracket will fit the bike (i may replace the crank as well as it is very worm after little use


I'd advise you to consult a bike shop as there may some interactions between a given BB and a given crank that may result in chainline problems. If you work with them and they can't get the recommended parts to work they will have to make it right.

Why is your crank "very worm [sic] after little use"? Do you mean the chainrings (which are replaceable)?

There may be other things at work here that a shop might spot and resolve.

Jul 08, 2011 | GMC Denali 700C Road Bike

1 Answer

Getting a clicking sound from the bottom bracket area. I have a Denali Pro. Can I replace the bottom bracket and what size


Yes, of course you can replace the bottom bracket.

First though you will want to make sure that the clicking noise is in-fact coming from the bottom bracket. Even though it sounds like it is coming from that area there are other things that can cause a clicking noise, such as the examples below.

Front derailleur cable end hitting the crank-arm is a common clicking noise.
Pedals can also cause a clicking noise that sounds like its the bottom bracket.
chain rubbing the front derailleur
chain has a kink in it.

The size of your bottom bracket is related to a few factors:
1 - thread pitch (your bike is english)
2 - Bottom bracket width (your bike is 68)
3 - Crank style and brand. This I do not know for your particular bike as you did not provide the year of the bicycle or brand of crank, and they change.

Taking off cranks and removing and installing a bottom bracket requires many bike specialty tools and is probably not the best project if you have never done this before or own the tools. It will be far less expensive to have your local bike shop replace the Bottom Bracket then to do it yourself. Plus they can tell you what size it needs and if the click is even coming from that part or not.

Dec 10, 2010 | Cycling

Tip

Bottom Bracket & Spindle Replacement of LeMond RevMaster


Part 1 Video Discussing the Dis-assembly & Inspection of the Bottom Bracket & Spindle for a LeMond RevMaster Bike

  • This Part 1 video will demonstrate how to inspect and adjust or remove and replace the bottom bracket and spindle on your Lemond Revmaster
  • Tools needed for this procedure:
    • 8mm Allen Wrench or Socket
    • Cotterless Crank Puller Tool
    • Lock Ring Removal Tool
    • Bottom Bracket Tool
    • Phillips Screwdriver
    • 4mm Allen Wrench
    • Bungee (optional)
    • Rubber Mallet
    • 7/8" Wrench
  • To begin remove the belt cover, there are four screws
    • You will need a 4MM Allen wrench
  • Now remove the two screws on the back from the opposite side of the bike
    • You will need a Phillips screwdriver
  • Now position the crank arm as seen in the video and remove the belt cover from the bike
  • Before removing the drive belt, tighten the brake assembly so that the flywheel is locked in place and loosen the torque on both bolts using an 8mm Allen wrench or socket
    • Do not remove them at this time only loosen them by a half a turn or so
  • Using a 7/8" wrench loosen the belt idler
  • Now use a 4mm Allen wrench to loosen the tension adjustment bolt completely, but do not remove it from the frame
  • Now remove the drive belt
    • To aid in this process you can use a bungee to slide in behind the belt at the top, as shown in the video
  • Then pull away from the bike while spinning the crank arms
  • Now remove both crank bolts with a 8MM Allen wrench or socket
    • Removal of the crank bolt on the left side of the bike is the same as removal from the right side
  • Now remove the crank arms with a crank arm puller, threading the outer portion into the crank arm as shown in the video
    • Be sure to thread the outer portion in as far as possible to prevent damage to the crank arm threads or the tools threads
    • Use a 7/8" wrench to make sure the outer portion is threaded in completely
    • Now spin the handle clockwise to press the crank arm off of the bike
    • Be careful when the crank arm comes off as if you are not holding it, it can fall in the floor
    • Also use the wrench to loosen the tool before removing the crank arm from the unit
    • Now you can unthread the tool from the cranks arm by hand after removing the crank arm from the bike
  • Next inspect the bottom bracket cups for looseness, to do this use the bottom bracket tool by hand to see if you can turn either of the bearing cups
    • To further verify the adjustment of your bottom bracket use a rubber mallet to tap lightly on each side of the spindle to check for movement from side to side, if you have movement, or one or both of the bearing cups is loose, you need to re-adjust the bottom bracket. If you are only inspecting the bottom bracket and did not find any need for adjustment you would re-assemble the bike at this point
  • Once the crank arms are removed look closely at the spindle
    • It should have defined edges and be smooth
  • As you can see by the video our spindle needs to be replaced
  • Next you will need to remove the lock ring
    • The lock ring is around the bottom bracket cup on the left side of the bike
      • In the video is an example of a lock ring
    • To use the lock ring tool you slip it over the lock ring using the three notches and torque the lock ring in the proper direction
      • This one needs to be turned counter-clockwise to loosen
    • Then remove the lock ring by spinning it off the bearing cup
  • Next you will need to use the bottom bracket tool to remove the bottom bracket cups
    • Begin with the left side
      • Slip the tool into the splines of the cup and loosen
        • For stubborn bottom brackets use a 5/16"-24 x 2" bolt and some washers with a 1-1/4" wrench
          • Slip the tool into the splines and thread the bolt with the washers into the spindle
          • Get it snug but not completely tight
      • Now use the wrench to turn the cup counter-clockwise for the left side and remove it completely
    • Remove the cup from the right side now
      • Slip the bottom bracket tool into the splines of the cup and turn it clockwise to loosen
        • For stubborn bottom brackets use a 5/16"-24 x 2" bolt and some washers with a 1-1/4" wrench
          • Slip the tool into the splines and thread the bolt with the washers into the spindle
    • If you cannot get the cups loose with this method try turning the bike on its side to get better leverage as shown in the video
  • This concludes the dis-assembly and inspection procedure of the LeMond RevMaster bottom bracket & spindle
  • Click here to see Part 2, re-assembly and installation to complete the replacement procedure
Video of Bottom Bracket and Spindle Replacement Part 1 Dis assembly LeMond...

on Feb 19, 2015 | Lemond Revmaster Lemond G-Force Digital...

1 Answer

Have a old american flyer road bike and want to change bottom bracket. not sure what size


Go to a bike shop and let them measure your cranks. Do you have a one piece or three piece crank? Do you have metric wrenches? Bottom bracket tool? You have to know the answers to these things to get the right size bearings, if it is a one piece you more than likely have a #66 but without seeing it, who knows.

Oct 26, 2010 | Eastern Bikes 19mm American Bmx Bottom...

1 Answer

The bar that attaches to the pedal needs some kind of pin to put the pedal back on.


I think I know what you are asking, but you haven't given me much to go on. Here are the names of the parts going from pedal to pedal -- pedal, crank arm, bottom bracket arbor, crank arm, pedal. Are you asking about attaching the crank arm to the bottom bracket arbor? And if so, are you missing the tapered pin that older bikes used to make this attachment? If so, the crank arm has 3 holes in it - one for the pedal, one for the bottom bracket arbor, one for the tapered pin. And your bottom bracket arbor will not have a square end, but will have a round end with a flat spot about 3/8 inches square. If you are missing this pin, then take the bike to a bike shop. It's a very inexpensive part, but might be hard to find the right size- or might require a little modification to fit. good luck Al K

Oct 15, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

I have a jamis cross country 2.0 bike. the bottom bracket creaks. not sure why.


One or both of your crank arms are probably loose. Try pulling and pushing (pretty hard) on the pedal end of the crank arm (toward the bike and away from the bike) If it's loose, it will be apparent. The arbor of the bottom bracket is usually square on the ends, and this is tapered (the square is bigger closest to the bike) You just need the right size wrench to tighten the nut that holds the crank arm onto the bottom bracket arbor.

Oct 01, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Cant get the pins out of the crank brackets on the bottom of the crank. got the bolts out but there are pins on each side of the bolts. most engines have two more bolts on the outside edge but this one...


The bottom bracket is the dohickey that connects your two crank-arms together, and secures them within the bottom of the bike frame. The bottom bracket has threads around the outside that secure it into the hole in the frame. Inside, bearings surround a rotating spindle -- this lets the pedals turn free from the frame. Each side of the spindle has a mechanism to connect your crank. This may be square tapered bolts, a toothed ring (splined bottom bracket), or even a threaded bolt. The bottom bracket type must match the crank type (a crank with a square hole must be mounted on a BB with the square receiver).
Bottom brackets also come in different widths, and with different spindle widths: the bracket width should match the frame, and the spindle width should put the cranks out away from the frame, and allow the front derailleur to transfer the chain onto the smallest ring without hitting the bike frame. The BB will usually have its size printed on the cartridge, but you have to take it out to read the numbers. For example, a 68x116 bottom bracket is 58 mm wide as it fits into the frame, and the spindles are 116 mm apart. If you wanted the pedals a bit closer together, you might buy a 68x112.5 BB.
Sealed Bottom Bracket: If your bottom bracket is a sealed cartridge unit (as most are nowadays), it can't be serviced or adjusted. If it grinds, wobbles, or catches, it must be replaced as a unit. Just remove the old cartridge and replace the entire thing.
Take the chain off the chainrings, and lay it on the frame next to the bottom bracket. With the bike clamped in a workstand, shove the base of the crank-arms side-to-side to detect motion in the bottom bracket. Now try to pull the cranks away from, then back towards the bike to detect wobble. Turn the crank and listen for noises within the bottom bracket. These tests will help you identify a damaged bottom bracket.
To replace the bottom bracket, you have to do some major stripping! You must remove both the left crank and the right crank arm plus chainrings. See the crank section for additional information.
PLEASE click on the link directly for more help
http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/bracket.htm
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Apr 02, 2010 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

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