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M#FEM4X3600A A/H water is blowing off of evaporator coil. Refrigerant pressures are correct. Customer states this has always been a issue since moving into the home.

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  • Roger Jelinek Apr 06, 2011

    What is the A/Cs duty cycle on the hottest days? What is the temperature drop across the coil? Has the sheave or pulley been replaced? Is the motor 1725 RPM and drawing the correct Full Load Amps (FLA or RLA)? Is the coil clean and installed correctly? Thank you. Roger

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Hello,
When there is water blowing off of the coil there is too much subcooled liquid in the coil. If the pressures are correct then the next culprit would be too high of a static pressure with the airflow. Adding in ductwork (both supply and returns) will help reduce the water coming off of the coil.
Hope this helps James

Posted on Apr 07, 2011

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I changed out the ac blower filter and re charged it and it barely blows cold air on my 2006 Chrysler 300


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Do I need to recharge coolant once in while?


Under normal conditions, refrigerant or freon need not be recharged or replenished. Refrigerant is contained in a "closed loop" that consists of a compressor, expansion valve, evaporator coil and condenser coil. If a leak developes as a result of damage to any of these components, the refrigerant will escape as it is under pressure. The leak will need to be located and repaired before refrigerant can be returned to the system. An unsufficent refrigerant level is always an indication of a leaking system, but; an A/C unit that fails to cool the air is not always a sign of a low refrigerant level.


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1 Answer

Air blowing but not getting cold had it recharged with refrigerant was cold for a few days, refrigerant pressure maintains but still no cold air/ no refrigerant leaks found.


It may be overcharged at this point. If so, the evaporator coil ices up and acts as an insulator. It will not absorb heat as the ice prevents it from doing so.

Aug 02, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

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Everytime my air unit shuts off it drains water heavy.Can you tell me what the problem is.


Restricted air flow over the indoor evaporator coil or low on refrigerant. Check return air filter and dust an/or debris in the A-coil itself. Use manifold gauge set to check refrigerant pressures as a last resort!

Aug 10, 2010 | Goodman CLQ36AR49 Air Conditioner

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if the evaporator coil on it ices up the thaws then ices up again your low on freon/refrigerant some use R-22 freon and some newer units use R-134a refrigerant,you can look and see if the condenser and evaporator coils need cleaning because if they get dirty and cant get rid of heat and it will build too much head pressure and the compressor will cycle off to protect it,but it sounds like a low refrigerant problem

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We have a danby dwc283bls wine cooler that no longer cools, and the compressor gets warm (above normal) does it need to be recharged


that's always a possibility but not always the case. The thermostat may not be cycling correctly or set wrong. The condenser could be dirty or if there is a fan, it may not be running. Freeze ups can also cause an "Out of temp." condition. Check it out.

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Refrigator not cooling coils clean and compressor working


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Sep 24, 2009 | GE Refrigerators

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''does a new radiator need refrigerant added to it''


You need to replace the condensor, then take it to a shop to have the a/c system evacuated and recharged to purge moisture because the system was opened. That will cost around $150. You do not need to replace the receiver/dryer/suction accumulator even though they will tell you that you do.
go to car-part.com to find prices of condensor from salvage yards. Page with asterisk on it is the lowest priced part.

--------------------------------------
The Refrigerant Cycle
During stabilized conditions (air conditioning system shutdown), the refrigerant is in a vaporized state and pressures are equal throughout the system. When the A/C compressor (19703) is in operation it increases pressure on the refrigerant vapor, raising its temperature. The high-pressure and high-temperature vapor is then released into the top of the A/C condenser core (19712).
The A/C condenser core, being close to ambient temperature, causes the refrigerant vapor to condense into a liquid when heat is removed from the refrigerant by ambient air passing over the fins and tubing. The now liquid refrigerant, still at high pressure, exits from the bottom of the A/C condenser core and enters the inlet side of the A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990).
The A/C evaporator core orifice is the restriction in the refrigerant system that creates the high pressure buildup in the A/C evaporator core (19860) and separates the high and low pressure sides of the A/C system. As the liquid refrigerant leaves this restriction, its pressure and boiling point are reduced.
The liquid refrigerant is now at its lowest pressure and temperature. As it passes through the A/C evaporator core, it absorbs heat from the passenger compartment airflow passing over the plate/fin sections of the A/C evaporator core. This addition of heat causes the refrigerant to boil (convert to gas). The now cooler passenger compartment air can no longer support the same humidity level of the warmer air and this excess moisture condenses on the exterior of the evaporator coils and fins and drains outside the vehicle.
The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) is designed to remove moisture from the refrigerant and to prevent any liquid refrigerant that may not have been vaporized in the A/C evaporator core from reaching the A/C compressor. The A/C compressor is designed to pump refrigerant vapor only, as liquid refrigerant will not compress and can damage the A/C compressor.
The refrigerant cycle is now repeated with the A/C compressor again increasing the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant.
The A/C cycling switch (19E561) interrupts compressor operation before the external temperature of the A/C evaporator core gets low enough to cause the condensed water vapor (excess humidity) to turn to ice. It does this by monitoring low side line pressure. It is known that a refrigerant pressure of approximately 210 kPa (30 psi) will yield an operating temperature of 0°C (32°F). The A/C cycling switch controls system operation in an effort to maintain this temperature.
The high side line pressure is also monitored so that A/C compressor operation can be interrupted if system pressure becomes too high.
The A/C compressor pressure relief valve (19D644) will open and vent refrigerant to relieve unusually high system pressure.
Clutch Cycling Orifice Tube Type Refrigerant System 75cc8eb.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 19E762 A/C charge valve port (low side) 2 19E561 A/C cycling switch 3 19C836 Suction accumulator/drier 4 19703 A/C compressor 5 19D644 A/C compressor pressure relief valve 6 19D594 A/C pressure cut-off switch 7 19E762 A/C charge valve port (high side) 8 19712 A/C condenser core 9 19D990 A/C evaporator core orifice 10 19860 A/C evaporator core 11 — Low pressure vapor 12 — High pressure vapor 13 — Low pressure liquid 14 — High pressure liquid

  1. Connect the R-134a A/C Refrigerant Center to the low- and high-pressure service gauge port valves.
  2. Evacuate the system until the low-pressure gauge reads at least 99.4 kPa (29.5 in-Hg) (vacuum) and as close as 101.1 kPa (30 in-Hg) as possible. Continue to operate the vacuum pump for a minimum of 45 minutes.
  3. Turn off the evacuation pump. Observe the low-pressure gauge for five minutes to make sure that the system vacuum is held. If vacuum is not held for five minutes, leak-test the system, service the leaks, and evacuate the system again.
  4. Correctly oil match the system to verify that the correct amount of refrigerant oil is present in the system. For additional information, refer to Refrigerant Oil Adding in this section.
  5. Charge the system with the specified weight of refrigerant and refrigerant oil.
  6. When no more refrigerant is being drawn into the system, start the engine and select MAX A/C operation. Set the blower motor speed to maximum and allow the remaining refrigerant to be drawn into the system. Continue to add refrigerant into the system until the specified weight of R-134a has been added. Close the charging cylinder valve and allow the system to pull any remaining refrigerant from the hose. When the suction pressure drops to approximately 207 kPa (30 psi), close the charging hose valve.

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1 Answer

A c starts off cooling good then compressor starts kicking in and


Several possible causes. Knowing the state of refrigerant charge would be helpful. Assuming it has a 'full' charge (full charge 680 Grams = 1.50 Pounds) Most common causes of AC problems:
1. Thermostatic switch (sensor) malfunction in the evaporator - allowing the evaporator to ice up. Check the vent temperature (using a cooking thermometer) to see if the temperature gets near or below freezing (32 Deg F.). If so, the thermostatic switch in the evaporator is defective. Replace it.
2. Refrigerant UNDER-charge. If the temperature does NOT get near freezing, then you need a set of AC gauges to check the compressor head pressure (High side) and the suction (Low side). High side pressure (nominal) is 229 PSI (+ - 20 psi) @ 2000 RPM. Low side (nominal) is around 20 to 40 psi. NOT common problems:
1. The magnetic clutch coil on the compressor... as it heats/warms up, the coil windings could be going 'open" circuit which would turn the compressor 'off.'
2. Compressor inefficiency (worn out).
3. Expansion Valve
4. Clogged Condensor

Mar 19, 2009 | 2004 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

Air condition/heater


sounds like the air-conditioning expansion valve is probably not working correctly here is a way you can fix your air conditioning:

  1. Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.
  1. Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:

  2. the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system
  • the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat
  • the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car
  • the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
  • the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
  • the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants
  1. Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again.
  2. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem.
  3. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system).
  4. Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor.
  5. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

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