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My central air conditioner is making a whistling noise in the inside unit when the compressor is running. It's not the blower because the noise stops after the outdoor unit shuts off. It's also not blowing any cold air and the piping is not getting cold. What could be the possible cause?

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Hello,
If there is no cooling (meaning no cold pipes and not blowing cold air) then check the outdoor A/C for any visible/obvious issues; breakers not tripped, no debris blocking the outside unit from passing air through it, etc. If all looks ok, you can start checking some things inside of the unit if you feel comfortable doing so. Also, most indoor heaters have a higher speed/rpm for the fan when the cooling kicks on, and the heat runs on a lower speed/rpm.

Hope this helps James

Posted on Apr 05, 2011

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Hi,Whynter Portable Air Conditioner has many moving parts, and they all make noise and cause vibrations. Some of these parts are more likely to causing shaking and loud noises, and sometimes this signals a larger problem, something to watch and scrutinize. If serious enough, it calls for a repair.

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Loose parts cause the majority of shaking and vibration noises in your air conditioner. A few of the most common loose parts include the air compressor, the piston rods and even the fan or blower unit itself. These noises are clunking, clanking sounds that occur along with a vibrating action. The only method of repair is a complete compressor replacement, which is a repair only a certified air conditioner technician is qualified to make. The compressor is a fully sealed component, so individual parts in the compressor cannot be repaired.

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For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

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Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
US. Proper care must always be taken to minimize the release of any gases. A license is also required to handle refrigerants. Make sure that the professional you call has the proper certifications to handle refrigerants properly.


http://www.fixya.com/support/r3636709-size_air_conditioner_need

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623253-window_air_conditioners_clean_every_year

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3633369-portable_air_conditioning_great_portable

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623166-heating_air_conditioning_scams

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3597468-you_can_add_air_conditioning_to_your_hot

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3583697-how_to_keep_house_cool_without_using_air

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The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
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http://www.fixya.com/support/r3636709-size_air_conditioner_need

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623253-window_air_conditioners_clean_every_year

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3633369-portable_air_conditioning_great_portable

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623166-heating_air_conditioning_scams

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3597468-you_can_add_air_conditioning_to_your_hot

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3583697-how_to_keep_house_cool_without_using_air

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