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The heater will not ignite. Could it be the thermocoupler and if so how can I purchase it? The spark is there and I can smell the gas.

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A bad Thermocouple doesn't prevent the pilot from lighting. It is a safety feature to shut the gas valve Off, when the pilot is not burning. To help you more, I will need to know what type of gas appliance this is, the manufacturer and the model #.

Posted on Apr 03, 2011

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Gas smell when igniting burner.


Hi Jerry

Warning : Gas systems are generally safe but any gas smell should always be investigated by a certified technician as you can never be too safe.

That being said, let me try to assist you as best I can from my experience with gas appliances.

If the smell has been there since you bought the unit, it is probably the pilot you are smelling. Generally, a pilot light is first ignited using either an electro-mechanical switch or using electricity to create a spark.

While ignition is taking place, a small amount of gas is allowed to flow through the ignition pilot nozzle. The spark is meant to ignite the pilot flame. When the pilot flame is lit, a thermocouple is heated up and then allows gas to flow to the main burners. The gas in the main burners then ignites directly from the pilot flame. This is generally how gas burners work but there are many types of equipment and not all of them work on the same principles.

Generally when you smell gas before igniting the main burner but detect no smell after the main burner is on, it has to do with problems in the ignition stage. This could be caused by a number of things but often the ignition probe is the problem. The ignition probe arcs a spark between two probes or between a probe and the burner which is meant to ignite the pilot gas nozzle (or in some cases ignites the main burner directly). Everytime this spark is made, a small amount of carbon forms at the connection point of the sparks. The carbon can build up over time and cause difficulty sparking the ignition of the pilot burner. Spilled food can also cause this or speed up the buildup of carbon.

If the gas can't ignite the pilot immediately, the pilot keeps allowing gas to pass into the air until ignited which is what you could be smelling. Check to see how long after you try to start the burner does it actually ignite. More than a couple of seconds and you will be smelling the gas that escaped without being burned off.

You can try disconnecting the unit from mains power and cleaning the ignition probes on each burner. If the unit has a mechanical starter you should take extra care not activate it during cleaning as you could get a electric shock. Clean the probe with a damp cloth or paper towel and don't use any cleaning agents.

If this does not eliminate the smell you are getting before ignition, you should get a technician to test the unit. The explanation above is also very general as I don't know what specific system you are using so use the explanation given as general knowledge only and get a technician to perform the repairs.

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Jul 17, 2016 | Kitchen Ranges

Tip

How to fix gas Reddy Heaters which will not continue to run.


When you light your gas heater, get it lit, hold the button for the required time, let go of the button and it goes out, you will either need to replace the gas hold on valve or the thermocouple.

I am assuming that a known good source of gas is hooked to the unit and the igniter is sparking when depressed. In addition to the igniter sparking, it also needs to be in the correct location. It should be located just behind the end of the gas burner about 3/8 ths of an inch and approximately 1/4 to 5/16 ths of an inch from the burner. If the igniter is too far forward or backward from where the gas exits the burner the heater will be hard, if not impossible to light. Adjust the position, carefully so that you do not break the igniter, with a pair of needle nose pliers. When properly located you should get a nice big spark with a bluish tint in the vacinity of the holes where the gas exits the burner. Make any adjustments with the unit unplugged and the gas turned off.

When you light the heater you need the gas to be turned on, but if it would lose its flame it needs to shut off automatically. This is a safety feature to assure that the unit will turn off when any problems are encountered.

The way that the shutoff is accomplished by Reddy Heat is to use a hold on thermocouple. The heat from the flame makes the thermocouple output between 18 and 28 millivolts which keeps the gas on. This can be checked with a DMM (digital voltmeter).

Turn off the gas supply. Remove the thermocouple from the gas valve. With the DMM set to the lowest millivolt setting place the black lead to the tip of the thermocouple and the red lead to the outer casing or ground. Relight the heater and if the thermocouple is good you should read between 18 and 28 millivolts.

In addition some units use a relay in conjunction with the thermocouple. You will have to determine if yours does. Remove the bottom base, if there is one, otherwise locate the relay. With the DMM set to ohms, measure the resistance of the relay between terminals 4 and 6. With no power you should read infinite, (open), and with power you should read less than 100 milliohms or a short. If the unit reads bad, open both ways, replace it.
With the gas valve being held open by the flame the heater will run until the gas runs out or it is shut off. If the flame goes out the thermocouple quits outputting power and the relay opens, shutting the unit down. Repair parts can be purchased at www.reddyparts.com .

These units do not have many parts and these are the most likely causes of your units failure to continue running.

Thanks for using FixYa and for the great rating.

hardrocko

on Mar 03, 2010 | Reddy Portable Forced Air Propane Heater...

1 Answer

Have 85000 but all-pro propane heater. starts fine good flame, release the gas valve button, heater shuts down no gas


If you have a thermocouple and standing pilot as described the gas cannot flow full to the burners with the gas valve button depressed because the position of the gas valve to allow the button to be depressed is not in the 'on' position....its in the 'pilot' position.

Are you sure you cleaned the 'thermocouple' and not just a 'spark ignition electrode' ?? One with spark ignition will not have a gas valve that has a pilot position.... Kinda confusing and conflicting data to sort through ..... Hmmmm....

If you have the spark ignition style, the problem COULD be in the 'flame rectification' circuit. IF it has the ignition electrode, the other side of the furnace will contain the 'flame sensor' that senses the flame and completes the ground circuit of the electronic module through the flame. Its not doing it, so either it is oxidized up inhibiting its ability to conduct electricity through the flame or there is residual oxidation within some of the terminal connections of the ground circuit.

IF what you have is the 'standing pilot', the first suggestion is to replace the thermocouple. A more remote possibility is the gas valve has a defective safety coil that drops out when you release the pilot button.

Dec 23, 2014 | All-Pro Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

WHY WON'T HOT WATER TANK IGNITER WON'T SPARK


In a typical gas hot water heater, the igniter glows to heat a thermocouple which opens the gas valve. There is no "spark" involved. Depending upon how faint the glow is, the thermocouple may not be heating sufficiently and may have to be replaced.

Jul 28, 2014 | Whirlpool Water Heaters

1 Answer

When the heat cycle calls for gas there is no ignition is my gas valve bad?


I don't know what kind of furnace you have. But most furnaces have some sort of pilot first than after it is proven than the main gas will come on. Either a standing Pilot with a thermocouple. A hot surface ignition or Spark ignition with a flame sensor. Or a direct fire system where hot surface or spark ignitor start first than all the burners send a 1 sec blast of gas which is proven by the flame sensor if it proves the gas valve stays on.....
In what you have said you have 24 volts to the gas valve and it has not lite. then does the gas valve have a pilot tube???Does it have a thermocouple?? Do you smell gas?? If you don't smell gas then the main part of the valve has not opened. The Pilot valve has to open first and prove before the main gas will come on. I hope this helps. If you still need help repost with the name and model # of the furnace.

Nov 18, 2013 | Honeywell Furnace Gas Valve Sv9501h2409

1 Answer

I have a propane torpedo reddy heater that ignites when the start button is pushed in, but goes out once I have held it for as long as a minute and a half. What is the problem?


When you light your gas heater, get it lit, hold the button for the required time, let go of the button and it goes out, you will either need to replace the gas hold on valve or the thermocouple.

I am assuming that a known good source of gas is hooked to the unit and the igniter is sparking when depressed. In addition to the igniter sparking, it also needs to be in the correct location. It should be located just behind the end of the gas burner about 3/8 ths of an inch and approximately 1/4 to 5/16 ths of an inch from the burner. If the igniter is too far forward or backward from where the gas exits the burner the heater will be hard, if not impossible to light. Adjust the position, carefully so that you do not break the igniter, with a pair of needle nose pliers. When properly located you should get a nice big spark with a bluish tint in the vacinity of the holes where the gas exits the burner. Make any adjustments with the unit unplugged and the gas turned off.

When you light the heater you need the gas to be turned on, but if it would lose its flame it needs to shut off automatically. This is a safety feature to assure that the unit will turn off when any problems are encountered.

The way that the shutoff is accomplished by Reddy Heat is to use a hold on thermocouple. The heat from the flame makes the thermocouple output between 18 and 28 millivolts which keeps the gas on. This can be checked with a DMM (digital voltmeter).

Turn off the gas supply. Remove the thermocouple from the gas valve. With the DMM set to the lowest millivolt setting place the black lead to the tip of the thermocouple and the red lead to the outer casing or ground. Relight the heater and if the thermocouple is good you should read between 18 and 28 millivolts.

In addition some units use a relay in conjunction with the thermocouple. You will have to determine if yours does. Remove the bottom base, if there is one, otherwise locate the relay. With the DMM set to ohms, measure the resistance of the relay between terminals 4 and 6. With no power you should read infinite, (open), and with power you should read less than 100 milliohms or a short. If the unit reads bad, open both ways, replace it.
With the gas valve being held open by the flame the heater will run until the gas runs out or it is shut off. If the flame goes out the thermocouple quits outputting power and the relay opens, shutting the unit down. Repair parts can be purchased at www.reddyparts.com .

Jan 26, 2013 | Reddy Heater-30-55,000 BTU Variable

1 Answer

I have a 225,000 to 375,000 btu propane heater that the gas valve will not open on. The igniter sparks I can see that .There does not appear to be a thermocouple unless it is built into the igniter. T


YOU MAY NEED TO CLEAN THE NOZZLE, THE FUEL FILTER, & POSSIBLY ADJUST THE PRESSURE AT REAR OF UNIT. MAKE SURE THAT THE FILTERS ARE CLEAR & UNIT HAS PROPER AIR FLOW OTHERWISE IT WILL OVERHEAT & TRIP THE HIGH LIMIT

Dec 25, 2012 | Reddy Portable Forced Air Propane Heater...

1 Answer

I havge an older RLP 100, When turn the knob counter clockwise to the low position and push it down the fire ignites. As soon as I let up on it the flame goes out. I held the knob down for a minute or so...


This could be that you just need to reseat the thermocouple.
Try this before you purchase new parts.

You can go to www.allpartsinc.com to purchase parts.

Just remove the end of the thermocouple from where is goes into the gas valve and leave the end that goes into the flame in place.

Clean the end of the thermocouple connect by scraping off just a little metal from the end just about there the nut tightens the thermocouple into the gas valve. After you have exposed some new metal do the same inside the valve where the thermocouple seats into the gas valve.
Use a small pic or similar item to scrape inside the gas valve to expose some new metal there also.

Now reassemble the thermocouple into the gas valve and see if the heater works.

Here is a link with some more instructions.
http://www.msservice.net/ts/reseat_thermo-clean_pilot-ODS.htm

Oct 17, 2010 | Reddy HEATER RLP100 100,000-BTU PORTABLE...

1 Answer

My pro comp heater will light the pilot but will not light the heater. It just sparks attempting to light, after a while it will shut off completely.


Could be your thermocouple. The spark should light the pilot and the pilot lights the main burner but if the thermocouple doesn't pick up the heat from the pilot the igniter will keep trying to light it until it times out and shuts off to prevent gas buildup.

Mar 10, 2010 | Procom MN300EPC Heater

2 Answers

PILOT LIGHT WILL NOT LIGHT


the thermocouple not only keeps the pilot on but lets the gas valve know its okay to open on a call for heat, remove your thermocouple and clean it with a fine grit sandpaper and if this doesn't work replace it all together.

Jun 02, 2009 | Lite On Laars Lite 2 Heaters: 250,000BTU...

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