Question about Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

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Sub I have a polk audio sub woofer for my home stereo system and for some odd reason after unhooking and rehooking everything back up it doesn't have the booom it use to. Why?

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Change connection cable with new one-------- change sub location move it from corner if you put it there.

Posted on Aug 05, 2008

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How to hook up dual voice coil sub


Two things I need to know
1 Make and model of Amplifier you intend to use
2 Is it going to be a single sub or 1of a pair

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1 Answer

How to hook up a dual voice coil subwoofer


The problem with dual voice coil subs is that the amplifier must be able to drive the load. I am assuming that each coil is 2Ohms each and the amplifier you are driving the subwoofer with is capable of driving that load. If this assumption (of the VC) is true your Amplifier will need to power the 2Ohms of the VC this will be "Normal". If the Amplifier is not capable of powering less than 4Ohms you will need to wire the subwoofer in "Series". If the Amplifier is capable of powering half the VC's resistance you can wire it in "Parallel". Normal wiring is going to be, Positive on the Amplifier goes to the Positive (red) side on the subwoofer and Negative on the Amplifier goes to the Negative (black) side on the subwoofer, then repeat this for the other output side of the Amplifier to the other VC, easy: This is "Series". Now if the amplifier is not capable of driving the load this gets slightly complicated. Positive from one of the positives on the amplifier goes to one positive side of the speaker. Negative goes to the opposite coils Negative side (black), now you get a short wire of your preference from the Negative that has no other input and run it to the opposite Positive side that has no other input: This is called "Parallel". If the Amplifier is capable of running a load lower than the resistance rating of the subwoofer then run the wire from Positive on the Amplifier to Positive on the subwoofer and Negative on the Amplifier to Negative on the subwoofer, and then run a short wire of your preference from the first VC to the other VC, Positive to Positive and Negative to Negative. Double check the wiring Red to Red and Black to Black in everything but "Series". Take it easy and don't wake the dead, I did that in the middle of the day they don't like being waken from their slumber.

May 02, 2014 | Re Audio Sxx12 12" 1000w Rms Sxx Car Sub...

1 Answer

My car stereo speakers shut down every 2-3 minutes forapproximately 3-10 seconds


The "installer" should suspect that you are driving the Bose amplifier too hard and it is going into thermal shutdown periodically.

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1 Answer

How to wire a home stereos equalizer 70


Posted by another Fixya expert but applicableto just about ANY Equalizer or or stereo analog sound processor:

http://www.fixya.com/support/t2524067-hook_up_yamaha_eq_70_equalizer

Like most audio things: outs to ins. You can also use a selectable Tape Loop if your rig has one or more. That way you can remove the EQ from the path if desired. Read on.

Be advised thast using ANY such processor on a modern digital multichannel audio device usually will ONLY be useful for 2-channel analog sources and when the loop on which it is connected is activated any digital sources will probably be disabled.

Sep 04, 2011 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

I cnt find away to instal my stereo graphic


'Organizer'?

It takes two to tango.Install to what? No manuals?

Any analog audio processor or tape deck traditionally goes into a Tape Monitor Loop on a receiver or preamp. Be advised that the use of any Tape/Processor Loop will disable digital audio sources on a digital receiver/preamp.

Web search that term. Then add 'equalizer' to it. They all attach in the same basic way.

Aug 05, 2011 | Technics SH-GE50 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Have a technics SHGE70 and trying to hook it up to a sony STR-K660P. the receiver has a red and white rcs for dvd audio in and red and whitre video audio in. thats all the rca outlets it has. i unhooked...


I see an EQ and a Receiver with NO Tape Loops or external audio sources mentioned.

Are you implying this used to be hooked up and working? Or are you asking how to integrate the EQ NOW after a move?

Normally the receiver would have a defeatable external loop for Tape recording. THAT is where the EQ or any other processor would go.

The following is mostly boilerplate for receivers WITH a tape loop. You need to understand what will and will not work even if you could attach the EQ.

--- Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast. --


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_TaoBB_L8lt0/TDi__0VSpoI/AAAAAAAAACc/uS9ODAazZi0/s1600/HPIM0718.JPG



If you wanted to Equalize a single external analog source you would have to connect the EQ Line output to either of the two analog inputs ("DVD" or "Video" in your case) and connect your external source to the Playback jacks on the EQ.


Mar 15, 2011 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How to install


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 03, 2011 | Teac EQA-120 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Trying to hook up my yamaha eq-70 to my new htr-5063


You don't. No tape loop or other place to insert it between the analog sources and the amps for the front channels.

http://www.retrevo.com/support/Yamaha-HTR-5063-Receivers-manual/id/23658bh532/t/2/

You'll notice on page 22 they don't show a return (playback path) from the 'audio recorder' or the VCR. That's a clue that there's no tape Rec/Playback loop, which is required for any external audio processor.

You can send analog audio out OR you can accept analog audio in, but you can't do both at the same time. Sorry.

Just the same, IF you had a Tape Loop or could break into a Pre-Out/Amp In slot...

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on most late-model Audio/Video Receivers (*) will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


* But not the HTR-5063.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up IF you had a Tape Loop:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Rec-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Play-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Jan 27, 2011 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How do you connect the dbx eq to a home stereo system


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically convert ed to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Jan 10, 2011 | DBX 215 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

SEQ-711 connection to sony STR D350Z


You can use the VCR audio connections for a stereo analog processor

Many people want to use an EQ with their modern multi-channel Digital Sound Processing gear but at best an analog 2-channel EQ (or any other processor) will only work with analog stereo sources. On most receivers, simply selecting the Tape Monitor disables all digital inputs. However, most DSP can still be employed with analog source material and a 2-channel processor with varying degrees of aesthetic pleasantness. Beauty is indeed in the ear of the beholder.


If that works for you, go for it. I do it, but I fully understand the limitations.

Mar 15, 2009 | Sony SEQ-711 Home Equalizer

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