Question about JVC Audio Players & Recorders

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Can the cable that connects to the stereo go bad? I have not been able to get sound from the turntable. Plugged it into three different receivers and nothing. Any ideas?

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I assume you are refering to the RED and WHITE ended cables that run from your turntable's AUDIO OUT (Left and Right) jacks to the stereo's PHONO IN (Left and Right) jacks on the rear of your stereo receiver.

The answer is yes, they can fail. Like any electrical wire they can develop internal breakages in the conductors over time especially if they are very old or have been handled a lot.

This should be a very easy problem to troubleshoot since new patch cords are readily available at any electronics store for just a few dollars.

Before you go out and buy new cables though, just make sure you have the stereo input set to PHONO and the volume turned up to a reasonable level when you are checking the signal from the turntable.

I am also assuming of course that the other stereo functions like the TUNER and the TAPE PLAYER inputs work fine and you can hear good sound coming from the speakers when you select those.

Please comment back here to this page if you have any questions, are still having trouble, or just require further general assistance and I will respond as soon as I see it.

Thank you very much and good luck.

Joe.

Posted on Apr 03, 2011

  • Joe2
    Joe2 Apr 03, 2011

    If your turntable's audio output wires are hardwired into the turntable, meaning they do not plug into jacks at the back of the turntable but instead lead directly inside the casing, then the solution to your problem may be a little more involved.



    If they are non-removable audio output cables, and you are certain they are the cause of the problem, then you will have to disassemble the turntable in order to solder in new output cables onto the output terminals inside. This is not overly difficult, but it does require a few basic tools and some electrical safety precautions.



    Please comment back here if this is the case and I will provide additional instructions if required.



    Thanks.



    Joe.

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