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Setting up home stereo/receiver


There isnt jacks for the equalizer to be hooked up in the back of the receiver how do I loop or what do I need to do? I have all componets (Yamaha) with me home tereo system set-up. HELP








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One of the shortfalls of recievers is there's no line outs from anything before signal gets to the amplifier because the amplifiers built in. This is a longshot......... but if you could hook up the eq to the tape in/ outs then send signal from cd, radio, whatever, to tape and can monitor the tape return ( if the reciever has a tape monitor button ) then it may work.

Posted on Aug 07, 2008

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How do I hook up My ART Model 341 euilizer to my Harmon Cardon Receiver using RCA cables?


http://www.artproaudio.com/products.asp?id=18&cat=5&type=82


Outs to Ins using one of the unidentified HK's presumed Tape Loops. Be advised that any stereo analog device or processor in the Tape Loop will only affect a stereo signal and any digital source will be DISabled upon activating the loop. I imagine the HK manual may explain that.

Sep 03, 2011 | ART 341 Dual 15 Band Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Have a technics SHGE70 and trying to hook it up to a sony STR-K660P. the receiver has a red and white rcs for dvd audio in and red and whitre video audio in. thats all the rca outlets it has. i unhooked...


I see an EQ and a Receiver with NO Tape Loops or external audio sources mentioned.

Are you implying this used to be hooked up and working? Or are you asking how to integrate the EQ NOW after a move?

Normally the receiver would have a defeatable external loop for Tape recording. THAT is where the EQ or any other processor would go.

The following is mostly boilerplate for receivers WITH a tape loop. You need to understand what will and will not work even if you could attach the EQ.

--- Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast. --


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_TaoBB_L8lt0/TDi__0VSpoI/AAAAAAAAACc/uS9ODAazZi0/s1600/HPIM0718.JPG



If you wanted to Equalize a single external analog source you would have to connect the EQ Line output to either of the two analog inputs ("DVD" or "Video" in your case) and connect your external source to the Playback jacks on the EQ.


Mar 15, 2011 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Hello, Can somebody please tell me how I can hook up my Yamaha EQ70 to my Yamaha RX-V663? Thanks very much!


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Mar 05, 2011 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Yamaha eq70 hook up to yamaha rxv-2600 tried to hook to tape connections do not have main in hook up do have the preout on back of rec help me


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In. That would be MD Tape, CD-R, VCR1 or DVR/VCR2 in your case.



Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 12, 2011 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Amp out and amp in for bose eq.hook up


  • 1

    Examine your receiver to be sure it has a tape monitor loop. Receivers with a tape monitor loop will have a button or switch on the front for "Tape Monitor," and have two sets of RCA connections on the back, one labelled "Tape In," and the other "Tape Out."

  • 2

    Take the two cables that are provided with the 901 speakers and insert one end of the first cable into the "Amplifier Input" jacks of the equalizer. Connect the red connector to the R input and the other connector to the L input. Connect the other end of this cable into the "Tape Out" connections on the receiver. Again, hook red to R and the other to L.

  • 3

    Connect the second cable between the "Amplifier Output" jacks of the 901 receiver and the "Tape In" connections on the receiver. Follow the guidelines in Step 2 for R and L connections.

  • 4

    Plug the 901 equalizer into a 120-volt electrical outlet. Your 901 equalizer is now installed.



  • Read more: How to Install a Bose 901 Equalizer ' eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4813156_install-bose-equalizer.html#ixzz19vfsJTQu

    Jan 03, 2011 | Bose Equalizers & Crossovers

    1 Answer

    I have an onkyo tx sr608 7.1 receiver and I want to hook up my yahama eq. I dont have a tape/monitor loop, how do I do it?


    Actually the VCR/DVR is a Tape Loop that would support the EQ or any other audio processor..

    http://www.retrevo.com/support/Onkyo-TX-SR608-Receivers-manual/id/23653ag916/t/2/


    Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

    The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

    In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

    Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

    The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

    EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

    In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

    Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

    If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

    Dec 31, 2010 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

    1 Answer

    How do I hook up technics equalizer sh-ge70


    This is boilerplate I wrote a long time ago for general eq or sound processors. Without know to what you are connecting, well, read on...

    Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

    The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

    In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

    Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

    The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

    EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

    In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

    Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

    If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

    Aug 05, 2010 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

    1 Answer

    How to set up eq70


    This is generic advice that should help you.

    Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

    The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

    In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

    Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

    The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

    EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

    In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

    Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

    If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

    Aug 04, 2010 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

    1 Answer

    How to connect jacks from gemini stereo graphic equalizer eq2010 to harmon kardon avr40


    I couldn't find the manual for this receiver, so you may have to adjust some of the terminology below to the labels used on the HK.

    Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

    The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

    In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

    Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

    The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

    EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

    In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

    Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

    If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

    Apr 11, 2010 | Gemini Sound Products EQ-300 Home...

    1 Answer

    Do you have any manuals as to how to hook this up to a sony str av-710 receiver?


    Well, since the EQ-0100 is a stereo analog component you will be able to use it only for stereo analog source material. Of course, once it's inside the av-710, you can manipulate the sound digitally for soundfield and such.

    Basically, hook it in like a tape deck, say, in Tape Deck 2's circuit. Then, whenever you want to use it inline with stereo source material just select Tape 2 Monitor and it will be placed inline. Be advised, any digital programming you want to hear will probably be muted if you monitor any tape deck. That's pretty much normal.

    You can slave an analog deck off the EQ as it has a Tape Record/Monitor loops of its own and facilities for making the EQ be on the Record OR the Playack side of it.

    Normally, the receiver's internal volume, eq or effects controls will not affect the analog loop out to the EQ-100 or attached decks, BUT, this receiver sends processed effects out to Tape Deck 2, if you should desire to record them (page 29 of the manual). Other REC Out jacks pass conventional UNprocessed sound.

    I couldn't find the exact instructions for this model but they all work about the same.

    Nov 16, 2009 | AudioSource EQ-100 Home Equalizer

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