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I have vintage 60's front and rear phlanged hubs (no spokes or rims) and would like to have them made up with say rigida rims. Can anyone advise likely cost and who best to approach in west london"ish area ?

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I can not answer the "who" to go to, but my experience is that any of the bike shops can point you in the right direction if they can not help you.

Vintage 60's hubs need to be going on a vintage 60's maybe 70's bike to work, otherwise the spacing will be off, so before starting this project make sure that these will work for what you are planning to put wheels on. Also you will have to be using a limited speed gear cluster for the rear hub, unless they are track hubs and then it's just one. Also you will need to know what size rim you are looking for to go with your bike frame. Modern road bikes use 700c but that was not the case in the 60's, they could have been any one of many different sizes and for your brakes to match up and the wheel to fit in the frame you need to know that too.

good luck, vintage parts can be fun to restore to working mechs but the older they are the less compatibility there will be.

Posted on Mar 31, 2011

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How do I replace a Tracomp spoke on a Mavis Ksyrium SLR rear wheel? Can't work out how to release the hub end.


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Alexrims dm18


The rim should not cause any problem - but you'll need different length spokes.

Rear hubs and front hubs are different widths, have different height hub flanges, and different amounts of "dish" (offset from the center of the hub body.

If your hubs and rims are in good shape; go ahead and re-use them; but you'll need help measuring or want to use a spoke calculator online for the correct length spokes.

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1 Answer

I just god a new tire, tube, rim and spokes. Except i dont know how to install the spokes! How do i install spokes through the holes and to the rim? What is the correct order to put them in? What direction...


Thank you for the inquiry.
This is one of those projects in life that best requires special tools (Spoke Jig) and a lot of patience. I also recommend a couple of good quality spoke wrenches. The one that comes with your tool kit usually is for general emergency spoke tightening and minimal maintenance. Even at the shops there is not to many people that know how to do this well. It's time consuming and shop labor is expensive.
That being said here goes:
To get started you will need to know a couple of things:
  1. Spoke lacing pattern
  2. Rear sprocket/hub alignment position. (Chain must run true from front primary sprocket) this applies only if this is a rear wheel.
I've posted a link to some helpful pictures of wheel lacing on various bikes to give you a few tips and pointers. http://www.rcycle.com/wheellacing.html
Look at the spoke pattern on your other wheel to determine the direction to push the spokes through and determine the spacing pattern for the short or long spokes.
1) Lay the hub flat on a bench and install the spokes loosely in correct pattern. 2) Lay the rim over the spokes and push them through. Spoke direction corresponds to the receiving angle on the rim. Important to get started correctly than alternate. 3) Thumb tighten a couple of the nuts/ferrels loosely to hold rim in position. 4) Tighten nuts according to get the hub centered as best as possible (just to temporarily hold) 5) You can build a fixture with a couple of 2 x 4s as shown in the illustration or carefully clamp the bikes axel in a vice, not to damage the threads or pinch the axel nut.Horizontal position. 6) You will need to clamp a coat hanger or a heavy piece of wire to something solidly fixed to act as a reference guide. 7) Tighten spokes first for correct up/down centering then for left/right centering. 8) UP and Down: Position your gauge wire close to the top/front of the rim and rotate. Finger tighten and loosen the spoke nuts until you get the wheel running true for up/down motion. Keep going around and redoing until you get it as perfect as you can finger tight only. 9) Move you wire gauge to the side of the rim and repeat process. The front rim has a disc brake position to align for (not to critical) and the rear rim has a critical sprocket position to maintain. You will have to measure the sprocket offset to get it correct. Chain must run true. 10) Spin the rim on the axel for reference and Keep going around and tightening and loosening the spokes until you get the side alignment running true. May take a while and many spins. 11) Once you get the rim running true for both wobble and run out you are ready to slowly start tightening the spoke nuts with your spoke wrench's. Take you time and keep tightening in tiny amounts until you get tight and true. Tap the spokes as you go and listen for tension. 12) When you tap if you get a dull thunk - it's a little loose. If you get a ringing musical string sound you know you are tight and/or close depending on the amount of ring. Take your time.
Before you mount the tire be sure you mount the rim on the bike and run the axel in place to final check for front brake rotor alignment or real sprocket alignment. You may have to adjust.
I have always wrapped duct tape in the V-slot to hold the nuts and prevent spokes from coming up and puncturing the tube. Go around several times. Just maintain the groove so you can still have room to place the tire bead in to stretch for mounting.
Best wishes and good luck from a fellow biker/racer.
TF

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1 Answer

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1 Answer

I don't know the spoke lengths for the primo mix cassette hub or the primo n4 front hub, does anybody know them?


To calculate spoke length you need several data points.

1) hub dimensions (flange, center to flange, axle length)
2) number of spokes
3) rim dimensions
4) cross/ lacing pattern of spokes.

For a good web resource to find spoke length and help with building the wheel try this.

You can also take into your local bike shop and they should be able to calculate for you as long as you have the information for the 4 factors above.

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