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Streaks I shot a roll of 200 the other day when it was slightly overcast and got yellow streaks going horizontally across the middle of my shots. This only happened on the last 6 or 8 pictures on the roll. Is this a film issue or did something happen to my camera?

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You may have a bad light seal on the film door. Try checking uscamera.com for replacements

Posted on Aug 08, 2008

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Film-advance warning won't go away on a RB67 Pro SD 120 film back?


Mamiya RB67 Pro SD that is new to me. loaded the film correctly took the first shot. But, the film won't advance. What am I doing wrong?

Feb 18, 2012 | Mamiya RB67 Pro SD Medium Format Camera

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My Mamiya C330 Pro only gives me 4 photos per roll


A few things to consider:
-Loading: Make sure you are not over loading the film before you start to shoot. I have sometimes turned the film advance too many times and end up cutting down on the amount of usable film.
-Are you loading the film in a dark area and careful to close up the back just after it has started to load to avoid exposing it?
-Shooting: Are you metering properly when shooting? Obviously underexposed images won't develop. You should consider a hand held meter.
-Shooting: Are you advancing the film more than it needs to be after you take your shot? Watch the film counter and feel for that click as it hits the next frame. I have advanced past the next shot many times by accident.
Hope that helps, Matt

Apr 05, 2011 | Mamiya C330 F Professional TLR Film Camera

1 Answer

I have a role of film w/ 15 shots and I need to finish the rest, how do I use it if it already been roled up


If the film has already been rewound into the cartridge then you need to use a film leader retriever to fish out the end of it again. You then load the film in the usual way and then in total darkness and without flash, fire the shutter 16 times and wind the film on between each shot. You need to waste an image to preserve those already on the film.

Note that you'll then have to tell the minilab operator what you've done: automatic processing equipment will look at the first few developed negatives to determine the frame spacing. When there's a gap halfway along the frame spacing will likely be out of register with the rest of the film, so you may end up with prints of half on e frame and half another. Also when the machine slices your negs into strips, it may cut halfway through some of the resumed shots. All this attention counts as special processing so may cost more.

But to be honest, the tool and the special processing is going to cost more than just losing the unused shots. Just get what you already have developed and printed and slap a new roll of film in the camera.

Feb 23, 2011 | Vivitar Instant Cameras

1 Answer

I have just developed out my film and realise it has a constant blue streak/line across the top of every photo. it is slightly obvious in some of the photos. may i know what might possibly cause that?


What you describe is typical of a film which is getting scratched as it is used in the camera, either due to dirt or debris in the camera, a rough finish to a camera part in the film path, or even just a faulty film cassette which had a bit of grit in the light seal when the film was rewound. It's very common in cheaply made plastic toy cameras like Lomos and Holgas.

If it happens all the time, it's a camera fault. If it's intermittent it's either a camera fault or a processing lab fault, but most labs run regular test rolls through to ensure these faults do not occur. If it's a one-off, then it was probably a bit of debris in the film cassette light seal.

If the fault is in the camera, lay the negative across the back of the camera and then look and feel anywhere in the film path that the line appears along to find the problem. Rectification usually means a bit of cleaning, or smoothing down with a sharp knife or fine abrasive and be very careful not to allow the material you remove to fall into the camera and cause more problems.

Sep 03, 2010 | Lomo Diana Mini 586 Film Camera

1 Answer

Owner's Manual for a Fuji Discovery 400 Tele Plus


Here's the owner's manual (link below) .

NOTE -> the DL-400 extracts the entire roll of film from the canister as soon as you close the back. Just the REVERSE of what you would expect. Then every time you take a picture, the camera rewinds the exposed (single shot) picture back into the cannister. When loading the film, YOU MUST PULL OUT ENOUGH FILM FROM THE CANNISTER TO GO ACROSS THE ENTIRE BACK OF THE CAMERA. There are 7 little notches on the botton of the cover. You won't see them until you open the back. The film MUST be extended far enough to reach the notches.

link
http://www.butkus.org/chinon/fujica/fuji_dl-400/fuji_dl-400.htm

May 09, 2010 | Instant Cameras

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I need a battery compartment cover opener for my Canon AE-1 camera. Where can I find one in the Sacramento, California area.


NOW YOU ARE GOING BACK TO THE DAYS OF FILM
TRY CAMERA REPAIRERS THEY MAY HAVE BITS AND PIECES
BUT ITS A LONG SHOT

Feb 15, 2010 | Canon Instant Cameras

1 Answer

Question on SnapSights waterproof camera


The SnapSights SS03 is a non waterproof camera supplied with 200 ISO film so you clearly have the SS01 model for 800 ISO. Both cameras have fixed aperture and shutter speed and rely on the wide exposure latitude of print film. 100 ISO is ideal if you have a camera with a wider aperture than yours, but if you use it then photos will be three stops underexposed; you'd possibly get away with this on land but underwater shots typically have more shadows than highlights and you'd lose a lot of photographic detail. By using 800 ISO the camera will produce photos which are noticeably grainy and with high contrast demonstrated by less detail in shadow areas and overexposed highlights, but for most purposes the photos will be acceptable and far better than none at all.

Colour negative film has a wide exposure latitude so you may wish to experiment with using 400 ISO or even 200 ISO. 400 will be one stop underexposed, but the printing stage can compensate to produce shots which are less grainy with better shadow details but which will lack some highlight detail. This can be partially compensated for if you tell the processing lab to "push process" your film at 800 ISO, but this will usually cost extra and for just one stop under I wouldn't bother, 200 ISO is really stretching it though and you may find that results are unacceptable unless you push process. Ultimately, it all depends upon how dark and how deep you go, but at much below 1,5m everything gets a strong blue colour cast anyway unless you use a powerful underwater strobe light mounted away from the lens axis.

Basically your camera is designed just to give you a taste of underwater photography and is very limited in what it can achieve. Even with a good specialist 35mm underwater camera such as the Sea & Sea MotorMarine II I usually find that I only have one or two usable shots on a 36 exposure roll, so if you do get the underwater photography bug then invest in a decent quality underwater digital model which accepts a proper external strobe lamp. The ratio of failed photos is similar, but at least you can review and delete them immediately without expense.

Jan 09, 2010 | SnapSights Intova Snap Sights SS03 Film...

1 Answer

35mm film developed with streaks


I take it the streak is a hot streak of light. If you're shooting negative, look at the negative and see if it's one long streak. If so the light leak could be anywhere between the film roll and the take up roll. I would open up the back, go into a closet and shine a bright light on the front of the camera and see if you can find the leak and tape it up. Otherwise, 35mm SLR's are very cheap these days. I'd recommend a Canon A-1 for your daughter, but you can't go wrong with any Canon or Nikon.

Sep 03, 2009 | Instant Cameras

1 Answer

Old sure shot - fixed lens, dropped, won't work, how to get mid roll film out?


wait until nite, then go to a dark room, ( bath room or closet ) no lights. remove film then rewind the film canister manually. turn plastic sprocket to the left untile all film is in the canister.
make sure no light is comming from around door.

Jul 31, 2009 | Canon Instant Cameras

1 Answer

Need instructions for use of fujifilm smart shot


Try www.orphancameras.com
This web site has operating manuals for a lot of cameras

Jun 03, 2009 | Fuji Instant Cameras

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