Question about HP Officejet Pro 8500 Wireless All-In-One InkJet Printer

4 Answers

The "fit to copy" command

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  • Richard Katz Mar 26, 2011

    OK, but you are basically saying you don't have a solution, so do I have to pay for that?

  • Richard Katz Mar 26, 2011

    The reply link to your comment does not work.
    This is a function of the HP 8500 at the control panel on the device itself, not a computer function.

  • Richard Katz Apr 02, 2011

    It was suggested that I try attaching the printer/copier to another computer, but the function we are dealing with does not involve a computer, but is initiated from the control panel of the device. It was also suggested that I download the latest firmware, but the device already has that same firmware version. I have run out of options. The fit to page function sometimes works and sometimes not, and I can't see any consistent pattern. HP told me to do a hard re-set, but the problem re-appeared after a short while.

  • Richard Katz Apr 02, 2011

    Thanks for the further information. You have a good point about the electronics being affected by power outages. We've had a lot in our area lately due to many snow storms. Hopefully that's done for the year. Unlike the PC, I don't have the printer on a UPS. Maybe I should, as it's not a laser. As for it being a non-persistent command, the display will show that "fit to copy:" is selected, but then it will copy at original size. Other times the display will show "fit to copy" and it does exactly that. When I save new defaults, the "fit to copy" selection that is displayed is persistent, but the behavior is not.
    One thing I am not understanding is the relationship of the drivers on the PC to this behavior, since we are typically running the copy function not from the PC but from the device panel or copy button itself. Is that behavior affected by the PC.
    I am suspecting your insight about the electronics being damaged by the power outages is true, because it suddenly stopped responding to print commands. I solved that by uninstalling the printer and then it automatically found it again and reinstalled the drivers and it works.
    So, if the electronics in the printer are damaged, can redoing the installation on the PC actually fix that? Or do I need to get a replacement for the printer?

  • Richard Katz Apr 05, 2011

    I wonder if your experts are reading what I am writing. This is not an error in printing from the PC. This has to do only with the copy feature on the machine itself, something that can run totally independently of the PC. So reinstalling the driver is irrelevant to the "fit to copy" issue.
    I did reinstall the printer driver once when that got disconnected, but it had nothing to do with Windows XP service packs. I am running the latest.

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4 Answers

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Hi

I suggest you repair or install the Service pack 2 or 3 of your operating system like for windows xp to correct the corrupted driver in the windows registry that change the setting from time to time.

Then uninstall and reinstall the printer driver and set up once more the printer. Check if it solves your problem.

I hope it helps you, Regards

Posted on Apr 02, 2011

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Hi well "usually "Fit to Copy" is a NON-persistent command, meaning you must set it each and every time you wish to use it.? also are you using the Print management software that comes with the printer, that will permanently set settings whereas windows properties may not?
It also depends on what program you are printing THROUGH ? This make a difference too.

below is your user manual, in here are all the commands you will need to know.
h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01643304.pdf


one reason, usually why the printers go like this is because the electronics primarily, the brain/memory areas are going/are? faulty, i have seen this many times, and slowly, all functions go awry over time, perhaps this is what is happening here too? When there is no logic or consistency to things then this is what it usually is, and the usual cause Power spikes surges, outages etc.

Really all one can do, is replace all the printer drivers again ON your machine that's VERY important must have the actual copy of the driver and software on the PC. Ensure that it is the latest. Also redo any Batch files associated too. Also, do a defragment of the HDD, do a HDD Disc cleanup too.

Posted on Apr 02, 2011

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Hi. I understand you frustration. To be honest with you, doing a hard reset is the last option that the unit can do. If problem went back after hard reset then there is a huge possibility that the firmware has a problem. Re-imaging the firmware would be the best solution for this issue. Only manufacturer can re-image the printer's firmware. I suggest you send the unit to HP for firmware re-imaging if it is still under warranty.

Posted on Mar 26, 2011

  • Ivy  Cada
    Ivy Cada Mar 26, 2011

    have you tried installing the printer to a different computer? try to install it to a differenet machine and see how's it going.

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  • Master
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Welcome to FixYa!

Good day. I have a few suggestions. I am not able to see what other experts have suggested so please bear with me if you have already done it.

1. Please check from the procedure below to make sure that you are saving the new settings properly.
To save the current settings as defaults for future jobs

  • Make any necessary changes to the settings in the COPY menu.
  • Select COPY, and then select Set New Defaults.
  • Select Yes, and then press OK.
2. Upgrade the firmware. The recent firmware upgrade release was April 28, 2010 and it fixed/enhanced the following:
  1. Improve paper pick performance
  2. Optimize the print head life
  3. Improve network connectivity
  4. Improve scan/copy/fax functionality
To download the firmware upgrade, go to http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/softwareCategory?os=228&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en&sw_lang=&product=3752459#N307


Note: The printer needs to be connected to the computer with the basic drivers installed.
The upgrade will update the firmware of the printer itself.

I hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa!
Keep me posted.
Jas247

Posted on Mar 26, 2011

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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