Question about E-Machines W6409 (7234) PC Desktop

2 Answers

Installed a Graphics Card on my Emachine. Made sure it is in the PCIX slot correctly and seated right. I also installed a Power adapter cable (20 PIN - 24 PIN ATX) to utilize the other 4 pins for use with the new Graphics card. Everything is in correctly. I power on and this is what happens.... CPU fan runs at constant speed (HIGH) SYSTEM fan runs. POWER UNIT FAN runs. HDD led blinks several times and stops DVD/CD ROM led blinks several times and stops consistent with HDD. No POST No BEEPS No VIDEO No BOOT

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I will look up your system but, do you know what your power supply is and what model/make card are you using? Why did you add a cable for power?

Posted on Mar 26, 2011

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  • David Petry Mar 26, 2011

    I can't, off hand, determine you power supply but, while you've got you case open see what you can figure out. The wattage should be printed on the PSU somewhere. Your system came with only 512 mb Ram which may or may not be enough for your card but I think it's pushing it. It comes with on board ATI radeon Xpress 200, which has been archived now. I can't find any driver for it so, I can understand the upgrade. If you can give me more info, I will try to assist you further but, I would figure on no more than a low to mid range card that doesn't require the extra power unless you want to change your PSU or add an external. I would definately upgrade to 1 GB ram, 2 would be better and the sticks aren't very expensive. Take the card out and try to power up. Let me know how it goes. Dave.

  • David Petry Mar 26, 2011

    You are using the PCIe express slot aren't you? your card should hook into it.

  • David Petry Mar 26, 2011

    Depending on the board, you probably only have one PCIe slot and it would be black or an off color. Your pci slots will be white and will not work.

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Sounds like there isnt enough power even with the adapters your powersupply cannot give you enough sustained power to run the system if you take the card out does it boot normally? even just disconnecting the power to the card?

Posted on Mar 26, 2011

  • merk21582 Mar 26, 2011

    No the graphics card does not have any Power inputs on it just the PCI slot. Yes it will boot normally if I do not have the new card in the PCI slot.

  • brian shevack Mar 26, 2011

    then what where you talking about with using a power adapter? im confused. another thing to try is a diff pci slot seriously. if the first one isnt avail use the 3rd one if open. also if you can get into bios disable onboard graphics

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I have an VGA adapter on the cord b/c 15 pin male/9 pin female is almost impossible to find. Anyway when I connect to two monitors to the pc only on monitor comes on the other does nothing. comfirmed both...


http://www.amazon.com/Female-HD15-Male-Adaptor-Molded/dp/B000I97FGA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1352480644&sr=8-2&keywords=9+pin+female+connector

9-pin female to 15-pin male RS232 adapter

This = NO

http://support.gateway.com/s/PC/R/1009371/1009371rv.shtml

You cannot run dual monitors off of the motherboard.
BIOS will assign only one IRQ.
(Interrupt ReQuest )

That 9-pin connector (C) is a Serial port. This = No

http://support.gateway.com/s/PC/R/1009371/1009371rvr2.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Port

You need a graphics card.

Don't be thinking of one monitor to motherboard, and one monitor to graphics card.
One IRQ, and it's assigned to either the -> motherboard graphics (Integrated), or a -> dedicated graphics card.

Two monitors to graphics card.

I am using a lesser model;
ATI Radeon 9250, and it's a PCI graphics card.
Goes in a white PCI slot.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5247980&CatId=1603

My PCI-Express graphics card gave up the ghost. (8 years old. It's cool)
I replaced it with the Radeon 9250 so could run dual monitors again.
Does fine for on here, Adobe Photoshop 7, YouTube, etc. Not a gamer.
(I have a Powercolor HD5450 PCI-Express graphics card I'm going to use, when I get off my duff, lol! Requires a 400 Watt power supply)

I use an HP 2009m 20-inch widescreen, as my Primary monitor, (Left side of computer desk), and a Philips 26-inch HDTV as my Secondary monitor. (Right side of desk)

Do you have two VGA (CRT) type monitors, or is one a flat LCD screen digital monitor?
Some flat LCD screen monitors have dual hookups.
One for a VGA cable, and one for a DVI cable,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface

If you have two VGA monitors that are the CRT type, (Looks like a small TV), and your graphics card has 1 VGA port, and 1 DVI port, they make a VGA to DVI adapter. Just make sure you get the correct one.

VGA port on graphics card is Female.
DVI cable connector is Male.
This is the usual standard.
This is the type of VGA to DVI adapter that is required,

http://www.directron.com/dviadapter.html

ALWAYS, install the software off of the Installation disk that comes with the graphics card -> FIRST
Install the drivers, and the user control panel.

(Driver: Small piece of software that allows the Operating System to communicate with a device.
The graphics card is the device, do not know what version of Windows you are using.
User control panel = ATI - Catalyst Control Panel. Nvidia - Nvidia Control Panel )

Do Not worry that you will loose graphics, after installing the graphics card software. Windows will Not use the software until THAT graphics card is installed.

Then after finished close all windows, go back to your desktop screen, and turn the computer off.
Unplug from power, FOLLOW Anti-Static Precautions, and physically install graphics card.
(Need to know about Anti-Static Precautions please post back in a Comment)

Set your main, or Primary monitor on the left side, Secondary monitor on the right; of your computer desk.
Turn the monitors on. If a CRT type allow them to warm up.

Turn the computer on. Once Windows has loaded your desktop screen will be on the Primary monitor.

1) Right-click on an empty area of your desktop screen
2) Left-click on Properties
3) Left-click on the Settings tab

The blue No.1 monitor icon is the Primary monitor
The blue No.2 monitor icon is the Secondary monitor.

4) Left-click on the Secondary monitor icon.
5) Left-click in the empty square box to the left of -
Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor

6) Left-click on Apply at the bottom right
7) Left-click on OK at the bottom left.

Your desktop screen will now be on both monitors.
(Advisory comes up asking if you wish to keep settings? Yes)

Open your internet browser.
Move your mouse cursor to the Right side of the blue frame/border.
WHEN your mouse cursor turns into a Double-Headed Arrow, hold the Left mouse button down.

It is a little tricky to keep the mouse cursor as a Double-Headed Arrow. Must be that, and then hold the left mouse button down.

Holding the left mouse button down move your mouse to the Right, and drag the blue border of the internet browser to the Right.
Keep dragging until it is all the way to the right side, of the Secondary monitor.

Now you have your internet browser on both monitors.

I run the internet browser on my Secondary monitor, (26-inch HDTV), and use the Primary monitor to look at computer functions, motherboard manuals, etc.
Or I move the internet browser to the Primary monitor, play music videos from YouTube, and use the Secondary monitor for Photoshop.

The world is your oyster.

So there you have it. You need a graphics card, and it has to have dual monitor inputs. (Ports)
Splitter cable thing? I wouldn't bother.

IRQ - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interrupt_Request

Buying a graphics card:
Depends on what you want to do with it for one.
You can see the simple stuff I do, doesn't require much graphics power.
(More than Integrated Graphics, though, and can't use dual monitors on Integrated Graphics)

The next concerns are what type of graphics expansion slot/s do you have, and how much Wattage (Power) the Power Supply has.

You have a 300 Watt power supply, unless it has been replaced,

http://support.gateway.com/s/PC/R/1009371/1009371cl4.shtml

(Scroll down; Power Supplies)

Your motherboard has 2 white PCI slots. If one is available it can be used for a graphics card -> Not recommended

Your motherboard has one Black PCI-Express x16 expansion slot, that is used for a graphics card, also.
It is right above No.1 white PCI slot.
Highly recommended.

(Gently Pull UP on the PCI-Express x16 slot -> Lock
It looks as though you press down on it, when installing, or removing a graphics card )

http://support.gateway.com/s/MOTHERBD/INTEL/4006158R/4006158Rnv.shtml

So when looking for a graphics card, look for PCI-Express graphics card, and system requirements / minimum power requirement; states 300 Watt power supply, or greater.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
I know that is a lot to take in all at once. I can clarify anything you need clarified.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 09, 2012 | Gateway GT5404 PC Desktop

1 Answer

P6TD fusible resitor blown near memory P0207?


What a minute hold the phone here!

Those are Ferrite Iron Choke Coils.

The 'little round cans' with the Red(?) edge on top, are Solid Polymer Capacitors, going around the processor socket.

Those are Ferrite Choke Coils going around the top side of the processor socket, immediately near the copper heat pipe fins. (Black/Square shaped top, rectangular shaped body)

The choke coils, and solid capacitors are part of the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit. These particular ones are for the processor.

The ones down by the Ram Memory slots are also in the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit.

May be for the Ram Memory slots, but easily could also be for the expansion slots, too. (PCI-E x16, PCI-E x1, PCI, etc)

Here is more info on the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit,

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

So; Are you using the correct voltage ram memory, or have you installed 'performance stuff', and had to change voltage in BIOS Setup?

More importantly,
1) Are you running a graphics card?
2) More than one?
3) Have the proper amount of power, (Wattage and 12 Volt power rail/s)
4) Proper power cables from Power Supply?

4) Same thing for the motherboard;
IF, you are using a Processor that requires a LOT of Wattage, and you are using a graphics card; are you plugging in an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable into the motherboard?

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable connector, is called an EATX12V power cable connector by Asus. It's up at the top edge of the motherboard, above the top left corner of the processor socket.

Called EATX12V to keep people from confusing it with this power cable,

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

They are NOT the same;
EATX12V, or EPS +12 Volt power cable; has FOUR Yellow wires.
A Yellow insulated wire is a 12 Volt wire. Black wires are Ground wires.

An 8-pin PCI Express power cable has THREE Yellow wires, and FIVE Black wires.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

BOTH, a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, and an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable; are power for the PROCESSOR.

Quad-Core, or a processor that uses this much power? 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

The MAXIMUM amount of Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver is 75 Watts.
EACH 6-pin PCI Express power cable is capable of delivering 75 Watts.
Total of 150 Watts available for a graphics card.

An 8-pin PCI Express power cable is capable of delivering 150 Watts by itself.

Point?
Use the correct power cable IF needed for the graphics card, and the correct number of them if two are required.

Also; IF you did not have the correct power cables; AND used a power adapter cable, USE all of the required 4-pin Peripheral power cables needed, for that power adapter cable.

For example;
I have noted those who did not have TWO 4-pin Peripheral power cables, required for a 6-pin PCI Express adapter power cable.
Just one was available, and just one was used.........

!O_O!
Nope!
This will result in;
1) PCI Express x16 slot contact pins - Burn
2) Gold plated contact pins on bottom of PCI-Express graphics card -Burn
3) 6-pin PCI Express power cable connection on graphics card - Burns
4) Contact pins in connector for 6-pin PCI Express power cable - Burns

That to me could also result in damage to electronic components, in the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit;

Hence -> Ferrite Iron Choke Coils

Awaiting your response,

Regards,
joecoolvette

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Oct 30, 2012 | ASUS P6TD DELUXE Motherboard LGA 1366...

1 Answer

M3A770DE 4 pin


Due to the 'large expanse' of information you posted I can barely contain myself.

1) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, that plugs into the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Note that this power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.

Back in the day there was no additional power cable needed, for the motherboard.
When the Intel Pentium 4 came out, the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable came out also.

Power for the Processor.

More, and more powerful hardware components for the motherboard, (Processor and graphics card), required more power to the motherboard.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

This power cable was used to connect directly to a graphics card, and provide power to it.

Note that this power cable has THREE Yellow 12 Volt wires.
It can carry up to 75 Watts of power.

Still wasn't enough power TO the motherboard, and TO the graphics card, with the new hardware component technology being brought out.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Note that this power cable has FOUR Yellow 12 Volt wires.
Is capable of providing up to 150 Watts.

A PCI Express x16 slot is capable of providing 75 Watts.

Note the shape of the sockets in the connector.
Now compare to an 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

DO NOT confuse the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
They are NOT the same.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector on the motherboard, is at the top left corner of the Processor socket, and close to the outside edge of the motherboard.

(With motherboard installed in computer case)

You can use the motherboard with just a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

Look at the LOCK on the side of the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector.

With that Lock AWAY from you, or on the opposite side of the connector, a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in on the RIGHT side.

If you have a powerful graphics card installed in your
PCI Express x16 -> slot/S, you had definitely better use a Power Supply that has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

This is a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable.
{ Molex was the first to design and produce this style of power cable CONNECTOR. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an open-end wrench a Crescent wrench }

IF you use an adapter power cable; Use TWO 4-pin standard Peripheral power cables!!
You need those Yellow 12 Volt wires.

What will happen if you do not use two?

1) The PCI Express x16 slot/s will burn.

2) The gold plated contact pins on the PCI Express graphics card, or cards, will burn.

3) If the graphics card, or graphics cards, require a power cable connected to them;
A) The connections on the graphics card for the power cable will burn.

B) The power cable connector will burn.

Other than that the only other 4-pin references on the motherboard, that I can see, is the optical drive's 4-pin audio cable connector on the motherboard, (CD1), and the CPU (Processor) Fan 4-pin connector on the motherboard.

For additional questions, or if the above is not what you seek, post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 08, 2012 | Asrock M3A770DE ATX AM3 AMD770 DDR3...

1 Answer

Will this graphics card work with my computer?


1) HP xw6200 Workstation desktop computer,

http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/11975_div/11975_div.HTML

Power Supply: Maximum rated Wattage - 500 Watts.

XFX ATI Radeon HD5750 graphics card,

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2GB-ATI-Radeon-HD-5750-1GB-HDMI-1080p-BluRay-EyeFinity-Gaming-Graphics-Card-/120973408169?pt=UK_Computing_Computer_Components_Graphics_Video_TV_Cards_TW&hash=item1c2a93b7a9&_uhb=1#ht_4735wt_1080

Yes.


1) Install the software F-I-R-S-T, then physically install the graphics card.
Windows running, put the Installation disk that comes with the graphics card, into the CD/DVD drive.
Load all software. The drivers, and Catalyst Control Panel.

Windows will NOT use the software until the graphics card is installed, so don't worry about not having graphics in the meantime.

2) Computer unplugged from power FOLLOW Anti-Static Precautions.

Anti-Static Precautions:
Your body carries Static electricity. Static WILL fry out (Short Circuit), the delicate hardware components inside a computer.

Relieve your body of Static BEFORE reaching inside your computer, AND before removing any parts out of their anti-static bags, or cartons.

Computer on a table, computer unplugged from power, computer case open;
TOUCH an unpainted surface, of the metal frame of the open computer case.
This action will relieve your body of Static.

IF you leave your computer in the middle of working on it, be SURE to Touch the metal frame again upon your return.

3) Physically install the graphics card.
(The Lock Lever on the PCI-Express x16 slot, goes UP to install a graphics card, or to remove a graphics card. It looks as though you should push down on it)

http://www.txcesssurplus.com/servlet/the-9225/HP-408544-dsh-001-xw6200-WorkStation/Detail

Looking at the black PCI-Express x16 slot, with it's green Lock Lever, it looks as though there should be room for the graphics card.

Looking to the right of the green Lock Lever, look at the 4 gold colored Choke Coils. It may be tight, but the graphics card should clear the first two.

Areas of concern, though;

1) Power Supply:
The XFX Radeon HD5750 graphics card, requires a minimum of a 400 Watt Power Supply.

The graphics card doesn't use 400 Watts, of course. This is the minimum power requirement by the graphics card manufacturer, and based on the power the card needs, and the rest of the computer.

XFX, just like all graphics card manufacturers, uses a computer system set up to the maximum, for a test unit.

Gamer style motherboard.
Powerful Processor, that is probably a dual core, or quad core.
Maximum amount of ram memory.
Two optical drives
Two or more computer case fans.
Two or more harddrives.

You get the picture.

Power consumption has to be based upon what each individual hardware component will use, AND the graphics card.

Power Supply:
Problem is, the computer has some age on it. From searching it seems to have been made in 2004. Makes it 8 years old now.
Makes that Power Supply 8 years old now too.

A) Pre-built computer manufacturers, such as HP, Gateway, Lenovo, Toshiba, etc., have their components made by someone else.
The Power Supply is one such component.

Usually a generic Power Supply manufacturer, such as Bestec, or HiPro, or Delta, for HP computers.
Low quality electronic components are used in these power supply's.

Isn't a big deal usually, until you start to tax the limit on the Power Supply, such as installing a powerful graphics card.

Power Supply manufacturers also had a great tendency, to overate their Power Supply's back in the day. Made the Power Supply sell better, 'fudging' the actual Wattage rating.

Wattage was actually more like 60 to 70 percent, of what was stated.
300 Watts (60 percent) to 350 Watts (70 percent) is more actual.

The XFX ATI Radeon HD5750 also requires a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable, coming from the Power Supply, and connected to it.

The maximum amount of Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver, is 75 Watts.
The 6-pin PCI-Express power cable delivers an additional 75 Watts,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

"This cable is used to provide extra 12 volt power to PCI Express expansion cards.
PCI Express motherboard slots can provide a maximum of 75 watts.

Many video cards draw significantly more than 75 watts, so the 6 pin PCI Express power cable was created.
These high-power cards draw most of their power from the 12 volt rail so this cable provides only 12 volts."

(Yellow wires are 12 Volt wires. Red wires are 5 Volt wires, Orange wires are 3.3 Volts. All are DC voltage. Black wires are Ground wires)

Will your Power Supply have a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable?
I doubt it.
In the Playtool link, see the 6-pin PCI-Express adapter power cable, shown on the right?

Takes TWO 4-pin Peripheral power cables,
(Commonly misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable),

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

If you are going to use one of these power adapter cables, you NEED TWO 4-pin Peripheral power cables!

HAS to have TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires going to it.

Will using a 6-pin PCI-Express adapter power cable, and One 4-pin Peripheral power cable work?
Most of the time yes.

PROBLEM is,
Over time the;

1) PCI-Express x16 slot contact pins -> BURN

2) Gold plated contact pins on the bottom of the graphics card -> BURNS

3) Connection on graphics card for the 6-pin PCI-Express power cable - BURNS

4) 6-pin PCI-Express power cable's connector -> BURNS

No if's, and's, or but's; it WILL happen.
Result is usually throw the motherboard away, and the graphics card.

So you may be looking at getting a better Power Supply.
Here is one example that will work,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899124&CatId=1483

A) 600 Watts. Gives you an additional 100 Watts of power. Less strain on the Power Supply.

B) 120mm fan. A larger fan turns slower, therefore makes less noise.
Puts out more air flow than an 80mm fan, even though it turns slower.

C) Has all the power cables required, plus more.

D) Has TWO 12 Volt power rails.
12 Volt 1 is capable of 23 Amp's.
12 Volt 2 is capable of 20 Amp's.
Total combined Amperage for the two 12 volt power rails is 43 Amp's.


http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?objectID=c01463539

http://h20464.www2.hp.com/media/278E215F-8E76-416C-BBE2-32F7B25FB1A1/xw62_FRU_video_powersupply.htm

Gamer computer?
Not IMHO. Uses ECC ram memory.

That is Error Correcting Control ram memory. The ram memory runs the data through it twice, in order to make sure everything is correct, before using the data.
This is the type of ram memory a Server computer uses.

Could be wrong, and it could be used as a gamer computer, though. We will see when you are done, IF this is the intent.

[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECC_memory

Reasons for not using ECC:
"A performance decrease of around 2-3 percent, depending on application, due to the additional time needed for ECC memory controllers to perform error checking;"

Regards,
joecoolvette

Aug 31, 2012 | HP xw6200 PC Desktop

2 Answers

My ATI firepro V7800 makes continuous beeping noise. PC does not boot when I turn it on.....pls help!!!


1) Believe the continuous beeping you hear is a BIOS Beep Code, stating you have a graphics problem. Computer, not video card, is beeping.

2) Do you have the external 6-pin PCI-Express power cable plugged into the graphics card, from the Power Supply?

3) IF, your Power Supply does not have a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable, are you using TWO 4-pin Peripheral power cables, connected to a 6-pin PCI-Express adapter power cable?

To wit;

6-pin PCI-Express power cable example, and also showing a 6-pin PCI-Express adapter power cable on the right,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

Example of a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,
(Misnomered by many as a 'Molex' power cable. Molex was the first company to make that type of connector. The name stuck, kind of like calling an adjustable open-end wrench a Crescent wrench),

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Note the color code of the wires used in a 4-pin Peripheral power cable, and a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable.

Red = 5 Volt wire
Yellow = 12 Volt wire
(All are DC Voltage)
Black = Ground wire. (ALL Black wires are Ground wires)

The 4-pin Peripheral power cable has ONE Yellow 12 Volt wire.
The 6-pin PCI-Express power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.

The most power that a PCI-Express x16 expansion slot can deliver, is 75 Watts.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

"This cable is used to provide extra 12 volt power to PCI Express expansion cards. PCI Express motherboard slots can provide a maximum of 75 watts."

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

"The older 6 pin version officially provides a maximum of 75 watts (although unofficially it can usually provide much more)"


The ATI FirePro V7800 graphics card requires 150 Watts by itself.

The PCI-Express x16 expansion slot CANNOT deliver the recommended power (Wattage) needed, therefore an external power cable capable of delivering 75 Watts is needed.

What happens if you just use ONE 4-pin Peripheral power cable, in a 6-pin PCI-Express adapter power cable?

The PCI-Express x16 expansion slot contact pins -> BURN

The gold plated contact pins on the bottom of the graphics card -
BURN

The connection on the graphics card for the 6-pin PCI-Express power cable - BURNS

The contact pins in the 6-pin PCI-Express adapter power cable -
BURN

If it is too bad, and cannot be remedied by cleaning, the motherboard is TOAST, and so is the graphics card.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Aug 30, 2012 | ATI TECHNO FIREPRO V7800 PCIE 2GB GDDR5...

1 Answer

I have installed two diferent graphics card, #1 was MSI 5459 and #2 was a Nvidia GeForce 250. Bth ran fine afor a short period of tme #1 for a month an #2 for about 2 weeks. After these periods of time...


I don't find the MSI 5459 graphics card, William.
Am familiar with the Nvidia GeForce 250 GTS, though.

Using the GeForce GTS 250 as an example, the graphics card requires a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable, for additional power, along with the power it gets from the PCI-Express x16 slot it is in.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

The unit is furnished with an adapter power cable, that converts 2 Molex power cables, (4-pin Peripheral power cables, actually), into 1 PCI-Express 6-pin power cable.

Note that the 6-pin PCI-Express power cable, has two Yellow wires in it.

Let's look at a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Note there is one Yellow wire, one Red wire, and two Black wires.

The Red wire is a 5 Volt wire, and not used by the adapter power cable.

The two Black wires are Ground wires, and only one is used by the adapter power cable.

The Yellow wire is a 12 Volt wire, and is used by the adapter power cable.

The 6-pin PCI-Express power cable requires TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.
(And three Black Ground wires)

This means Two 4-pin Peripheral power cables MUST be used.

Failure to use two 4-pin Peripheral power cables, to that adapter power cable, means the GeForce GS 250 is NOT receiving enough power.

This will burn the connection at the graphics card, burn the adapter power cable connector, and burn the PCI-Express x16 slot it is sitting in.

Takes time, but will happen.

Could this be what you have done?

It also requires 150 Watts all by itself. You need more power for the rest of the computer.

(The 6-pin PCI-Express power cable is designed to provide up to 75 Watts of power. This means 75 Watts of power, also comes from the PCI-Express x16 slot, it is sitting in)

Nvidia GeForce GTS 250,

http://techreport.com/articles.x/16504

For additional questions post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 20, 2012 | HEWLETT-PACKARD HEWLETT RECERTIFIED...

1 Answer

HOW TO INSTALL bfgr981024gtge


  1. This card installs into a PCIE slot on your mainboard. Hopefully you have done your homework and your PC has this type of connection.
  2. Observe Static precautions to prevent ESD which damages components.
  3. With the computer off, remove the existing card (if any) in the PCIE slot. Take a moment and some geek spray to blow out the slot and surrounding area.
  4. Look at the card physically. If it has a 6 pin power connector, you need to connect that to your power supply. Some video cards will ship with an adapter to convert a 4 pin molex into a 6 pin PCIE adapter. Again, hopefully you have already taken this into consideration.
  5. Gently insert the card straight in, applying gentle pressure to get the card to seat. The mounting clip should line up to your case when it's all the way in.
  6. Once it's seated, install a screw or clip to secure the card.
  7. Connect VGA (blue) or DVI cable (white) to the monitor.
  8. Start computer.
  9. The display may look very large. This is normal until drivers, etc. are installed.
  10. Visit www.nvidia.com to get the drivers (software) for your card. Select your specific model. (9800GT) and your version of windows.
  11. Download the drivers.
  12. Once it finished double-click the file to begin the setup process.
  13. Do not run any other programs while the setup program is running, including browsers, antivirus, etc.
  14. Once the installed is running, choose the express option if available. Otherwise the default options should do just fine.
  15. Once it's done it will probably ask you to restart the system. Go ahead.
  16. If there are any problems please post back where you got stuck and what happened.

Dec 08, 2011 | BFG Technologies BFG Tech GeForce 9800GT...

4 Answers

No signal. Installed in a Evga x58 3x sli motherboard.


Is the card seated in the slot correctly.
Did you check the bios by tapping the correct key when the computer boots and making sure the computer is set to use the PCI express slot. Sometimes the bios will not allow the PCI express slot to function without manually configuring it to do so.

Feb 28, 2011 | Evga 01G-P3-1430-LR GeForce GT 430...

1 Answer

Can a Dell Dimension 2400 take a GeForce 6600 graphics card?


This card can only Be installed in a Tower CPU. Your Card slot will not Accept this.

Jan 23, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Problem with PCIX 133MHz slot


Make sure that all drivers and software for these devices are installed before installing the hardware.

Jul 20, 2007 | Lava Computer DSerial-PCI 3.3V (DSERPCI3V)...

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