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I am having problems with fugi film superia 400 asa. I take a lot of wildflower pictures and the color yellow very often turns out mustard yellow or even orange. Any help for this situation?

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Ive got a fuji s6500fd and am having trouble with some lenses that ive got for it. the 5xmulti image lens looks crystal clear before i screw it to the camera but when i try to take pics the images really show up the contours of the lens and look naff - help!

Posted on Aug 03, 2008

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Takes great day pictures. Night photos all I can see is eyes and not what it is. Have taken the batteries out a couple of times to reset it.


You need to either take images in good light or turn the flash on. Flash will give you a reasonable image at 10 to 15 feet. Also look in settings to see if you can alter the speed of the 'film'. Sensitivity is measured in ASA. The higher the ASA the more sensitive the 'film' becomes to light. 400 ASA or 800 ASA would be good. Modern DSLR Cameras will go up to 18,000 ASA

Taking the batteries out will do nothing to help you :>)

Feb 06, 2016 | Cameras

1 Answer

Nikon d40x exposure problem


I assume that this is a film camera that has light meter.
It could be that the camera is set to a different film sensitivity than the actual film.
For example, the film is 400 ASA but the camera is set to 100 ASA.
The sensitivity rating of the film is written on the film box and on the film cartridge. Make sure you set the film ASA number on the camera too.

Aug 24, 2013 | Pentax Photography

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My equipment: N75, 28-80, 70-210, 50fixed. I generally use Ilford 100 or 400 b & w films. I seem to have a - recurring - problem with the end result. The pictures are severally grainy, irregular...


The grainy nature of the picture is nothing to do with the camera. Do you develop your own film? If you don't and you are paying for processing, find a new processing house! If you are; the problem is reticulation. In any case the 400 ASA negative film will be more grainy that the 100 ASA. Both will benefit from some thoughtful processing. Key points that will help are: Do not over-develop or "push" the film. Pushing is leaving the film in the developer for longer than the recommended time (on the instructions in with the developer chemica)l. Pushing will increase the effective film speed by a controlled amount, but will always increase grain size, some times worth the price. BUT... the most common reason for graininess when not "pushing" film is reticulation. This is caused by the simple mistake of washing the film after developing and fixing (hopefully at 20 degrees C), in cold tap water. The sudden temperature change causes the grains to join up (Reticulate, just like a giraffe!) into bigger grains. Not reversible. Just do the wash stage in water that is the same temperature as the developer and the fixer. Of course the wash or stopper between dev and fix can cause the same problem... same answer, have everything at 20 degC. The irregular patches (dark on the negative) will be caused by insufficient agitation during development. The tank should be inverted every few seconds, or if in a commercial dev line, it should have nitrogen gas agitation every few seconds. Usually what happens is the dev house runs out of nitrogen but doesn't realise it has. If you can post a sample of your pictures I can be more accurate with a diagnosis, or email some to me at david@dtmpower.com

Dec 22, 2010 | Nikon F75 35mm SLR Camera

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My indoor photos all have a greeninsh yellow effect


That's caused by lighting. More specifically by the type of lighting in use there. Every different type of light puts out a certain color range, some pink, some green, some yellow, some bluish.

How do you fix it?

1. use flash. Flash puts out a bluish light color balanced for daylight. Most film available today is color balanced for daylight. Problem here is that on camera flashes are weak and only reach about 10 feet. The rest of the picture will be greenish yellow. More powerful flashes extend that 10 feet based on the power they have, and may provide enough coverage. The reach of the flash is also determined by the film ASA.

2. use a filter on the lens. Get an FLD (flourescent-daylight) filter.

3. Scan the negs to digital and correct with Photoshop or another photo editing program.

Jan 24, 2010 | Fuji Photography

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How do i use the mode setting to insure quality pictures in gloomy weather conditions


Something we have all been wrestling with over the years, LOL.
quality pictures in gloomy weather conditions ? I suggest using the flash as often as you can in those conditions, and get yourself a tripod.
When the skies turn grey, there's less light, so the camera keeps the shutter open longer, which means more likelihood of a blurred image due 2 camera movement. Flash use speeds up the shutter, but will use more battery power. Another issue: with 100 ASA film, the flash is only good for about 12 feet. Distance improves with higher ASA film, but quality suffers due to film grain.

Oct 14, 2009 | Vivitar PZ 3115 35mm Point and Shoot...

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Promaster 2500pk super camera


400 asa and 27 degree din are the same,no other settings are needed. enjoy your camera.

Jun 05, 2009 | Photography

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Can't change the ASA


if it does not support manual ASA/ISO selection than you can just easely set it to under exposure( 1F stop) and afterwards just develop it as a 800ASA film.

May 06, 2009 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

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I need some general info on this camera's specs; i.e., film speed


Vivitar TL-125 was popular around Christmas 1988. Good to see your is still going strong!

In terms of ASA ratings, it would depend on whether the model has DX coding (which you would find as a set of gold pins in the bay where you put the film cassette.... If it has, then the asa range would be 50 - 1600 asa. If it hasn't, then Vivitar used to put a small selector on the baseplate of the camera to switch between 100 and 400 asa.

As a rule of thumb, I'd always use 400 asa film in this type of camera.... the extra two stops of speed far outweigh the loss of picture quality - especially with point and shoot zoom lenses.

I can't find a specific manual (no one seems to stockpile them), but if you can read a generic one, try the Vivitar point and shoot here :
http://www.butkus.org/chinon/vivitar.htm
(Note, I think you use a different sort of battery, but the controls and placings are all very similar between models).

If you need an original manual, then Oldtimer cameras will sell you an electronic download, or there is an original coming up on eBay in the USA in the next couple of days (with a camera - for spares). If you were really cheeky, you could ask the vendor to scan it in for you.

Hope this helps.

Nov 23, 2008 | Vivitar Photography

1 Answer

How do i change ISO/ASA on the nikon N65?


The ISO is automatically set by the DX code on your film canister - if there is no code, the camera sets ISO 100. If you load canisters yourself with, say ISO 400 film, you can adjust the exposure using the exposure compensation button at the top right side of the LCD ( " +/- " ). Using ISO 400 film set the +/- to minus 2 ( -2 ) so that it will UNDEREXPOSE 2 stops since the film is 2 stops ( 4X ) more sensitive than ISO 100 film.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

Contax 137ma ASA will not move...


I have a very vague memory (I used to sell cameras many years ago) that there is a stop at ASA 400 to prevent you accidentally selecting a faster speed. I do remember something of the sort on a camera of that era but it may not have been the Contax. IIRC, you have to lift the dial a *second* time (i.e. a bit higher) to get it past the stop. Hope this helps but it may be a red herring!

May 15, 2007 | Contax 167 MT 35mm SLR Camera

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