Question about Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

To reduce background noise from an audio mixer

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 604 Answers

When you say background noise I assume you mean the inherant noise that electronics produce. the the first thing to do is to make sure that all you input connections are shielded type, you don't need to spend money on gold plated connections, but do buy cables that are made with stranded wire and of decent size, bigger (fatter) is better when it comes to minimizing high frequency losses. Next, calibrate your inputs one at a time with a 1000hz signal that is 0db inn level. You can find this signal online through a search. you can also buy small plug in devices that produce this signal at 0 db (that is Zero Decibles) this is a common reference for "consumer" grade mixers, If you can't or don't want to spend any money on this you can use a signal from any tone generator, and some mixers have them built it. If you don't have any of the former, here is what you can do. turn all you mixer controls to 0 (zero) detent. in other words, flat, no treble, no bass, no midrange. on your inputs there should be input level knobs, these woule be set to thier lowest positionn if using a line input signal. if a microphone that level would be different, but wait on that for a bit. now have all you input knobs (or sliders) at minimum level. Now turn on your amplifer (if your using one) or what ever you monitor the output with. Headphones is a good choice as you can hear everything.
You should hear nothing. (nothing is supposed to in the inputs yet) if you hear noise take note of what it sounds like. turn the sound output level out (if headphones, turn up to a high level) and listen again. is the noise white (hiss) or hum (low freqency) if you have no noise, you have a good mixer and that is what it should be.
No plug in your first input, this is your choice but I would suggest you plug in microphone, now turn it up to the point where you can hear your own voice, you should hear just that, and maybe anything in the backgroud (furnace, tv, etc_) the quieter your environment, the better you can adjust this. Remember you will now need to turn up the input level. If you have meters you should be able to adjust the input to register in the green without turning red, a litlle yellow once in awhle is ok.
If this is quiet and clean you are ready to move on. turn that mic down to zero, but leave the input where you set it.
now plug in a line level source (your tape player,/cd player/ but don't use your computer as a source (yet). without anything playing on your machines you should hear very little noise in your headphones, if you hear a lot of noise you have bad cables.
Now play something through the tape/cd player, what ever and turn up the slider (not the input) this should give you a level,again in the green, with a little yellow, NO RED
once finished with this turn it back down and go to the next input. this time plug in your computer which most likely is coming from the green jack on the back (or front) of your PC/Mac or whatever. computers are very noisy machines, and just being close to one is sometimes enough to cause noise in a high gain system. anyway, plug in your computer and listen, you should hear some noise and I'd be surprized if this wasn't the source of your problem. make sure your volume level on the output of your pc is set to maximum, this will give you an advantage when recording. now turn up the slider on this input and listen for the noise level. good cables are important here and also the price of your computer may be reflected here as well since more expensive machines are better filtered and therefor produce less noise.
play a sound file (windows audio samples are noiseless and clearn) so use them if you can find thiem, look in your music folder for the sample files
You may hear some noise but your mixer is now set up at optimum and should give you nice sound if it is a quality mixer, good luck, Keith

Posted on Mar 24, 2011

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How can I reduce white noise / hissing I'm getting over the mic on a Behringer Xenyx 1204 USB setup?


Hi, you didn't say if the mic actually passes sound? The C-1 is a condenser Mic & needs phantom power - switch on the rear of your mixer. If that's no help, what happens if you disconnect the mic, then turn the levels back up? Still hissing or gone? If it's gone then it's the Mic - must use a 3 wire cable, preferably XLR so it gets the phantom power. If the hiss is still there without the Mic then sounds like the mixer is faulty - try some of the other channels..... How loau is the hiss - just in the background or as load as a vocal "one, two" test? A few things to check anyway...... Good Luck!

Dec 01, 2016 | Behringer Music

1 Answer

I Purchased behringer c1 u microphone and I want to record my singing with karoke..Problem is that when I connect laptop with speakers my singing volume is coming louder but sound of background music is...


You need a mixer. Connect the microphone to the mixer and also the background music. That way you have separate control of volume for the voice and the music.
The background noise can come from different sources. One of them is from the laptop itself, if the laptop is noisy to begin with.

Mar 14, 2014 | Behringer C1U Microphone

2 Answers

Just bought a ProFX8 mixer to connect to my Bose L1 PA system, but as soon as I connect the outputs to the Bose inputs and raise the master fader there is a "ground hum" even without anything...


Make sure you are using BALANCED audio interconnect cables AND that the speakers and the mixer are powered from the SAME receptacle... Yes, this means running extension cords. It is a ground loop problem. You should be using XLR or TRS cables BALANCED cables from the mixer to the basss unit of the L1 system. The bass unit and the mixer MUST be powered from the same receptacle to avoid ground loops and hum.

Aug 17, 2011 | Mackie ProFX8 Professional Compact Mixer

1 Answer

Have a low noise like hum when i turn on thump 15A It doesn t change by moving level but when I plug in anything it s feeding a noisy tale on every signal attack.


Make sure you are using BALANCED audio line to the speaker AND your mixer is powered from the SAME receptacle as this speaker. One MAY have to run an extension cord back to the mixer and othe equipment, but this must be done to reduce noise and also for equipment safety. Multiple recepatacles in a building have grounding issues that can generate noise or worse damage equipment due to ground loops. If you DJ mixer does NOT have balanced outputs, use DI boxes so you can use balanced lines to your speakers. Your cables will either be XLR or 1/4 inch TRS types, not just TS type.

May 14, 2011 | Mackie TH-15A Active DJ Powered THUMP...

1 Answer

Sometimes my AKG Perception 420 won't record properly, when played back it sounds like white noise with the faintest sound of what i'm trying to record in the background


All microphones have a signal to noise ratio. Basically defined as the level of desired sound to background noise (unwanted sound). Microphone phones also have self noise which should be considered when choosing a mic. There will be noise in every mic, some more audible than others. Condenser microphones require phantom power (48V). This can be supplied by mic prea
mps, mixers, and similar equipment. *Note that phantom power (mic pre amps) must be on or engaged, this can be specific to different types of equipment.
Troubleshooting:Has your microphone been dropped or exposed to moisture? Internal damage to your microphone will be hard to assess but this could possibly be the issue. Inspect the microphone cable, check for damages. Try using a another microphone cable-- preferably a new one. Next to check would be your mic's power supply. Make sure all connections are made properly (mic to cable to power supply). If you are using a mixer or pre amp with multiple inputs, test the mic on each input. (You should test by making recordings and comparing with each change to isolate possible causes). Also test the mixer or pre amp by slowly sweeping the input gain feature while recording an audible source such as singing into the microphone. Typically next in the audio recording chain would be your DAW (digital audio workstation) or computer, but problems with noise most likely precede this.
I could possibly provide more useful information if I know your exact setup.
Provided that you have your equipment setup properly, the microphone or mixer/preamp could possibly be damaged/malfunctioning. I suggest taking your equipment to a trusted repair shop, or if still under warranty, returning to the manufacturer for repairs or replacement.
Hope this helps

Apr 05, 2011 | AKG Perception 420 Microphone

1 Answer

Hope you guys can help... I have a laptop Karaoke system. I connect from laptop to 6 channel mixer to speakers. I use a stereo phono to RCA from laptop to mixer. I am experiencing a buzz coming through...


Yep! Get a decent audio interface that attaches to the PC with a USB connection and uses BALANCED lines to your mixer. I use a UA-25EX Roland/cakewalk as an example. (about $200 and there are cheaper units such as M-Audio Fast Track MKII ) Note these interfaces BOTH record and playback with two channels for stereo.
Essentially the audio board that is in PC's and Laptops are too near the switching noise of the processor and some of that is just bound to get into the audio lines as they don't even have balanced audio lines from the computers. Make sure you use either TRS or XLR balanced cables from whatever interface you get. Also connect ALL interconnected equipment to the same power source or receptacle. You can try to reduce the buzz with the mixer EQ's with what you have, but that sacrifices audio quality.

Mar 30, 2011 | AMP Speakers Pro Karaoke System

1 Answer

Speaker/Volume problems


try to fix it in the sounds and audio in control panel..

Nov 28, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

S9 malfunctioning


does the other buttons work play pause
if not then your phone most likely does not have

Audio Video Remote Control bluetooth Profile (AVRCP)

Aug 12, 2009 | Motorola Mobility S9 Headphones

1 Answer

Crackling sound


Hi, the problem could be in your phone line, A solution I found was a free download from CNET called "Noise Free Voip"
This is a small download that runs with Skype etc and works very well at reducing outside noise factors.
Regards mistyman

Nov 01, 2007 | Intel Frontier Design Dakota 24-Bit PCI...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio Players & Recorders Logo

Related Topics:

286 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio Players & Recorders Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

5056 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

74136 Answers

Are you an Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...