Question about F2 Spyro Team Snowboard Bindings

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Where can i find a foot strap 4 my binding ? - F2 Spyro Team Snowboard Bindings

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Try searching auction sites like ebay. Otherwise it is very hard to find one. Good Luck

Posted on May 03, 2011

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Broken esp youth suprahero strap


Broken esp youth suprahero strap - Fixya

www.fixya.com/support/t15750244-broken_esp_youth_suprahero_strap
Jan 8, 2013 - broken esp youth suprahero strap - Emsco ESP Youth Suprahero Snowboard question.

Where to order replacement strap for Emsco ESP Youth ...

www.fixya.com/.../t22712551-order_replacement_strap_emsco_esp_you...
Jan 6, 2014 - Where to order replacement strap for Emsco ESP Youth Suprahero ... The red foot strap broke - Emsco ESP Youth Suprahero Snowboard ...

ESP Youth Suprahero Snowboard ' DICK'S Sporting Goods

www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?...

Dick's Sporting Goods
Rating: 3.1 - β€Ž31 reviews - β€Ž$24.99 - β€ŽIn stock
Shop ESP Youth Suprahero Snowboard at DICK'S Sporting Goods. Find more ... It has adjustable plastic straps that easily fix over your child's snow boots. .... Nice board for a kid to use on sled hills but binding broke after minimal use. Value.

Burton 07 Custom S Bindings Snowboard Binding Small ...


Jan 08, 2013 | Emsco ESP Youth Suprahero Snowboard

1 Answer

My daughter has K2 Debut snowboard bindings which are REALLY hard for her to put on, and especially release. Even I have a hard time. It seems like the black strap with the teeth is just a bit too wide...


Try changing the black straps. You can get them in almost every Sports shop. Just take one off the ratchets with you and try out the different sizes they have.

Good Luck

Apr 18, 2011 | K2 Cinch Cts Snowboard Binding

1 Answer

Looking for Nitro binding plates and back strap


Visit the Nitro Snowboard web site and use their store locator to find a store near you. Give them a call and they will be able to help you to order the parts you require.

May 02, 2010 | Nitro Raiden Bolt Snowboard Bindings

1 Answer

Snowboard boots with reduced length


You may also want to look at how you are setting up your bindings. I have a US 11 foot (29 cm) and with my bindings set correctly have never had any issues with toe or heal drag.

The best way to set up your bindings it to take them off, remove the mounting screws, keep the base plates in and fit your boots into your bindings with the straps still undone. Then, with the board on the floor, position the binding at the angle you like (roughly) and look to see when the toe and heel over lap is even or if you are like me pull the bindings back slightly so that you have little or no toe drag and just little heel drag. It works a treat and I have done this for over a hundred customers over the years.

Mar 15, 2010 | Burton Boxer Snowboard Boots

1 Answer

Replacing plastic strap that hold the toe cap.


You just need to remove the binding form the board and look underneath the binding. If it doesn't drop out by itself just lever the broken piece out with a flat head screw driver. Once this is done you can insert the new part screw on the cap strap

Mar 04, 2010 | Burton 07 Custom S Bindings Snowboard...

1 Answer

I am wanting to know ''how'' to use the machine ?


Do you mean how to ride it? Well first off your going to want to put your bindings on about shoulder width apart with your left foot angl;ed about 12-30 forwardand you back foot about 12-20 angled back. Then your going to strap in and start going down the bunny hill. bend your knees slightly and stick your **** out. I find its better to ride with a little more of my wieght shifted to the back. to start turns lean a little to the direction you want to go and the push or pull you back foot out depending on which way your turning( the pushin pulling is more for very sharp turns). to stop turn the board sideways and lean on the uphill edge, MAKE SURE YOU LEAN ON The uphill edge and keep the other edge from touching the snow otherwise you WILL fall and can hit your head easily.

Mar 17, 2009 | Millennium Three M3 Discord 155.5 cm...

1 Answer

Snowboard binding


No womens large bindings are rated womens size 8 or larger, and mens 7-9. If you have burton bindings you can shorten the adjustable strap. but make sure you strap in and when you crank down the straps you should not be able to move your boots or wiggle them around.

Feb 26, 2009 | Flow M9 Snowboard Binding

1 Answer

I cant change a ankle strap


get some flow bindings...lol. you might want to try to use a little lubricant like wd-40 where the release button is on the ankle strap, they do tend to stick and make it difficult to remove straps.

Dec 28, 2008 | Winter Sports

1 Answer

Snowbard bindings adjustment


"With everyday use, the screws, nuts and bolts that hold the highest stress areas together tend to loosen up. Consequently, they need to be tightened regularly to ensure that a strap doesn't fall off and get lost. However, not every Mountain Resort provides tool stations, so it's important to have a Snowboard Tool within reach (preferably in your pocket) at all times. Remember, a snowboard tool is a small investment that will definitely pay off over years of riding. Also, with the standardized insert pattern of snowboards, and with the built-in adjustment capacity in most Bindings, Mounting and Adjusting Bindings has become simple quite a simple task. To be able to do this, make sure you have a screwdriver and a wrench or two. Also, it would be a plus if you have some basic knowledge about the stance width, stance location and stance angle. The distance between your front and rear foot is the Stance Width. The basic stance width is roughly the length of your shoulder-width apart (about 30 per cent of your height). The location of the center point between your Bindings relative to the center of the snowboard is the Stance Location. Conversely, the angle of the Bindings across the snowboard's longitudinal axis, wherein zero degrees represents a line that is perpendicular to the snowboard's length, is the Stance Angle. * Forward Lean For starters, check your board's Forward Lean. The forward lean is the amount of forward angle on the highback support. For more leverage and more responsive heelside turning, add more forward lean. By adding forward lean, you also force your knees to bend, consequently ensuring a good riding stance. Still, too much forward lean makes your knee bend too much. Over bending your knees put pressure on your quadriceps muscles and reduces your ability to turn easily. So don't overdo it. You can usually adjust the forward lean in soft-boot Bindings by changing the position of a plastic stay behind the highback. * Rotating the Highbacks You can easily rotate your Bindings' Highbacks if your bindings have slots on the hinges where the highbacks are fastened to the binding's baseplate. To make your heelside turning more responsive than when it is angled along with the baseplate, adjust your Bindings in parallel with the Snowboard's Heel Side Edge. You can do this by loosening the bolts and rotating the highbacks. * Adjusting Strap Position Generally, this involves unscrewing the straps from the baseplate and moving them forward or backward on the Bindings. To improve control, move the straps higher up on the foot. Conversely, move them down lower to increase flexibility. Make sure that the toe strap is resting around the base of your toes and is securely holding down the tip of the boot. Shorten your straps if you find yourself pulling on them for a snug fit. You can do this by fastening the straps to the baseplate further along the length of the strap. Most straps already have extra holes for this adjustment."

Dec 01, 2008 | Flow M9 Snowboard Binding

1 Answer

Snowboard bindings types


"Strap Bindings Highback Bindings The Strap Bindings is the original and still the most popular Binding System in Snowboarding. This is because Strap Bindings are not only adjustable and very secure, they are also comfortable. Nowadays, this Type of Bindings is designed to be lighter and stronger. Strap Bindings consists of a contoured baseplate where a rider can place his Soft Boots upon. At the back of the baseplate is a vertical plate (the highback) that rises behind your ankles and lower calves. The highbacks on Snowboard Bindings secure the heel of your feet and the backside of your lower legs. It also helps you to force the heel side edge of the board into the Snow Surface and brings the toe side of the board up. At the front of the binding are two or three adjustable straps which can be used to secure the front side of your feet and ankles to the Snowboard. Initially, you may have to sit down to strap in, but with a bit of practice, it'll be easier to strap in while standing. Strap Bindings can differ in the number of straps, the shape of the base, and highback plate. Alpine riders who need to perform high speed turns will prefer taller and stiffer highbacks for greater control and improved edge control. On the other hand, Freestylers will want a shorter backplate for more flexibility and turning power. Most people go for these kinds of bindings as they are more common, offer excellent control, and offer more options when it comes to boots-bindings combinations. The combination of the highback plate and the front side straps gives great control. This Type of Bindings is used in combination with Soft Boots. As the Binding gives all the support needed, the Snowboard Boots can remain soft and comfortable. Keep in mind that the Best Strap Bindings have ample amounts of wide padding at the toe and ankle straps. Step-In Bindings Step In Bindings It is quite hard to get into Strap Bindings since you need to loosen and tighten the straps every time you get into and out of your bindings. This is why Step-in Bindings were developed. This Type of Snowboard Bindings allow you to simply step down and click into it, thus making it easier for you to get on and off your snowboard. With this feature, Step-in Binding Systems have become quite popular with rental shops because they often give the beginners fewer Snowboard Equipment to fuss with. Still, while Step-In Bindings give you additional speed and can save you from a load of hassle, you pay for these conveniences when it comes to snowboard control. Step-in Bindings don't have any straps to give additional support, making the Snowboard Boot less flexible, and thus, harder to do Snowboarding Tricks. So make sure you get a good fit if you're planning to buy this. Step-in Bindings usually work in combination with soft boots which are somewhat stiffer than those used with highback bindings. When you opt for Step-in Bindings, you narrow your selection in choosing Snowboard Boots and Bindings since they both have to be ""step-ins"". However, there are some higher and more advanced Step-in Bindings out on the market that provide the best of both worlds. Step-ins can be used for either Freeride or Freestyle riders. Cross-over skiers will often feel comfortable with Step-in Bindings and boots since they are used to stepping in and to harder boots and just turning a switch or a latch whenever they want to get out. Flow-In Bindings Flow In Bindings Flow-In Bindings is quite new and is a hybrid of the step-in and strap systems. This Type of Snowboard Bindings tries to combine the control of Strap Bindings with the ease of Step-in Bindings. Flow-In Bindings look rather similar to Strap Bindings and also allow you to use soft boots. The notable difference is that, unlike the two or three straps that cover the top of your feet in Strap Bindings, the Flow-in Bindings have only one large tongue that covers a large part of the top of your Snowboard Boot. Getting into and out of your Bindings is a matter of flipping the highback backwards and entering or exiting your boot. Flow-in Bindings are becoming more popular as the choices and Techniques of Snowboarding improve. People love the Flow-in System as it combines all the advantages of the Strap Bindings with the ease of Step-ins. One disadvantage however is that Flow-in Bindings are more difficult to adjust than strap-ons. Plate Bindings Plate Bindings Plate Bindings, also known as Hard-Boot Bindings, consist of a hard baseplate, steel bails, and a heel or toe lever. This Type of Bindings is used in combination with Hard Boots that can be inserted into the bails. By flipping the lever, the boots are strapped firmly into the Bindings. The features of the Plate Bindings are the closest to a traditional Ski Binding and their rigid responsiveness provides maximum leverage and power for high-speed carving and riding on hard snow. Plate Bindings and hard boots are mostly preferred by Alpine Racers who need the extra edge control that they get from this combination. Baseless Bindings This Type of Bindings was introduced in the mid 1990's by several companies. In Baseless Bindings, the sole of the Snowboard Boot is placed in direct contact with the Snowboard deck by removing the Binding's baseplate. With this, the sole height is lowered by up to 1/8 of an inch. Theoretically, using the Baseless Bindings enhances the ""feel"" of your Snowboard's flex. However, this Type of Snowboard Bindings aggravates ""toe drag"" problems for people with large feet. Also, most Baseless Bindings are far more difficult to adjust (stance angle/width) than traditional ""4x4"" designs. Still, Halfpipe and park riders prefer Baseless Bindings because it provides them with a quicker edge response. The choice of what Type of Snowboard Bindings to use usually comes down to personal preference and finding the right Snowboard Boot first. If you feel that the convenience of stepping in outweighs the additional control you can gain, then it is best to go for that particular Style of Binding. Regardless of which Type of Binding System you wind up with, don't head for the slopes until you know exactly how to get in and out of them. With or Without Highbacks? The large curved piece of plastic screwed to the base of the binding is the Highback. Its main function is to give riders some control over their Snowboard's Heel Edge. These can be found on all Bindings or are built into the boot with some Step-in Systems. Alpine riders who need to perform high speed turns will prefer taller and stiffer Highbacks for greater control and improved edge control. On the other hand, Freestylers will want a shorter backplate for more flexibility and turning power. Snowboard Boots and Bindings form a combination wherein not all Kinds of Bindings are suited for each type of Snowboard Boot. It is often best to buy them together. In here, knowing your intended Snowboarding Style is crucial before buying a combination of boots and bindings. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Flow M9 Snowboard Binding

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