Question about Maytag MDE9700AYM Electric Dryer

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I have a Maytag MDE 9700 A purchased in the US and brought to Australia. We run 240 V in Australia ground, neutral, and hot/active, the terminal block on the dryer has ground and three other terminals the instruction booklet shows the center terminal as neutral, and in step three says connect the other wires to the outer terminals. We have four terminals and only three wires around neutral and hot.

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  • Tony Adams Mar 23, 2011

    Thank you, the only problem we have is in Australia we only have a three pin plug with three wires ground neutral and active/hot, and in this case we have four terminals neutral, 2 actives and a ground.

  • Tony Adams Mar 23, 2011

    Thank you, I only read the top half, and now I've read the bottom half of your answer I understand exactly what you're saying. That is exactly the information I needed appreciate your help.

  • Tony Adams Mar 23, 2011

    Absolutely, this is exactly the information I needed perfect.
    I appreciate your help.

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1st you do realize that Australia runs 240 volt 50 cycle (hz) and this dryer is for 60 cycle? if that is not a problem and the dryer can run on 50 cycle power the here is how it is hooked up to the four wire connection.

The two "hot wires" connect just as before. Both black wires will connect where the old black wires were.

The white wire will go to neutral, just as before.

The green, or Ground wire will connect to the frame of the dryer. Try to find a suitable ground point on the dryer to connect the green wire. Often you'll find a green screw that's intended for the green wire.

Posted on Mar 23, 2011

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  • yadayada
    yadayada Mar 23, 2011

    See if you can make sense of this explanation, I understand what they are saying read it carefully and you will see where you are going Arie.



    American 240 volt outlets are fed with two live 120 volt wires and a grounded neutral wire. To put this technical subject simply the two 120 volt wires are used at either end of the heating elements to produce 240 volts and the neutral wire is not used. Either 120 volt wire can be used to power the motor and timer along with the neutral wire and the other live wire is not used. If the dryer is plugged in in Australia the heating elements will be fine but the timer and motor will quickly by fried.! :banghead: :banghead: With shipping costs what they are this would be an expensive mistake indeed.
    Then there are these cycles you have probably heard of. America uses 60 cycles, Australia and Europe use 50 cycles. Transformers and converters DO NOT change the cycles, only the voltage. Put simply American currant alternates back and fourth 60 times per second and Australian currant 50 times per second. Another way to understand this is that American generators turn at a higher rpm than Aussie ones and so do any motors connected to them. An American 60 cycle motor will run slower and possibly overheat on 50 cycles even with the correct voltage. Heating elements are not affected by the difference in cycles.

  • yadayada
    yadayada Mar 23, 2011

    Remember if the dryer motor is not tagged as being able to run on 50Hz then it will likely overheat and burn out. The heating element doesn't matter 50 or 60Hz is ok..

  • yadayada
    yadayada Mar 23, 2011

    I believe I've sent what you need to hook this up, but my advice is have an electrician check this.

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Can u help me please we're do the brown grey and white with pink line wires go


Four-Wire: Green

The green wire is the ground wire, and it is the difference between a three-wire and a four-wire cord. (In the three-wire system, the ground wire and the neutral wire are the same.) The green wire connects to the dryer frame. Look at the cord-connection terminals on the back of the dryer. Very close by, you should see a screw sticking out of the metal panel. It will be labeled "external ground connector" or something similar. Connect the green wire to that screw.

Four-Wire: Black

Most appliances in your house run on 120 volts of electricity, some on 240 volts. The dryer needs both--240 volts to run the drum and heating element, and 120 volts to run the timer, thermostat and other components. For this reason, the dryer cord has two live or "hot" wires--one black, one red--rather than a single hot wire. The dryer draws 120 volts from each hot wire to get the 240 volts it needs for the heavy work, then pairs one hot wire with the neutral wire for the 120 volts to run the smaller functions. Look again at the connection terminals on the back of the dryer. There should be three screws in a horizontal row. Connect the black hot wire to the terminal on the left.

Four-Wire: Red

Connect the other hot wire, the red wire, to the terminal on the right. (In truth, you could connect either hot wire to either hot terminal, but it's standard procedure to put the black on the left and the red on the right, so do so.)

Four-Wire: White

The white is the neutral wire, and it connects to the center terminal. There may be a metal strap attached to this terminal. That's a ground strap. When a three-wire cord is attached, it serves the same function as the ground screw mentioned above.

Three-Wire: Gray

If you have a three-wire cord, then all three wires will be gray. They're arranged side-by-side with the hot wires on the outside and the neutral wire in the middle. Attach the hot wires to the left and right terminals and the neutral wire to the center terminal. Make sure the ground strap is attached to the center terminal.

Nov 20, 2012 | Dryers

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

How to wire 240/15/1


240 VAC single phase 15 amp. Newer code requires a 4 terminal plug. Ground is now seperate from the neutral/return. 12 gauge wire should be acceptable for up to 8 feet, 10 would be better and better for a bit longer run- reduces voltage drop and current draw slightly.

On the motor itself, it should have the terminal connections marked on the motor or on the cover plate.

in general the "hot" pair connect across the hot terminals of the motor. and the ground goes to frame of motor. There should be a terminal location for "white" which would be "floating" if the motor is convertible 120/240.

Black +Black or Black +Red depending how the space was wired, it in most cases does not matter which of the two motor connections the hots are connected to on single phase unless explicity denoted on motor. this is rare. Three phase it matters for direction.

Jan 22, 2012 | Air Tools & Compressors

1 Answer

Im installing an Intermatic ET104C timer and have in the past installed a few WH40 Intermatic timers with no problem but ive always had 4wire supply or 10/3. This time its a 3wire supply or 10/2 w/ground...


Line voltage is not known.
240Volts has 2 hot wires and no neutral wire.
If both 10-2 wires test hot to ground, then you are working with 240V and no neutral is present.
http://waterheatertimer.org/240-v-water-heater-circuit.html#120-240

ET104C timer is shipped default setting for 240Volts.
ET104C can be wired many different ways.
Terminals 1 and 2 are for running the timer operation. So power lines connect to terminals 1 and 2.
Terminals 3 4 5 6 are dry. They have no power when wires are connected to terminals 1 and 2.
Typical 240v ET104C wiring shows next image.
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/ET-water-heater-circuit2-40.jpg

Jun 18, 2011 | Intermatic INC ET104C 24 HOUR ELECTRONIC...

1 Answer

Model T104P wiring instructions for 110volt motor


T104 timer is for 240 Volt circuits. It has internal 240V clock motor. Clock terminals and timer terminals are connected, so there is no way this timer can control 110V circuit.
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html

T101 timer is for 110V circuit.
T101 has 110V clock motor
Both white neutral wires = terminal A.
Black hot wire from breaker box = terminal 1
Black wire to load = terminal 2.
Grounds = green screw
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T103 timer is for 110V circuit
T103 has 110V clock motor
Both white neutral wires = terminal A.
Black hot wire from breaker box = terminal 3
Black hot wire to load = terminal 4
Grounds = green screw

T1905 timer is for 110V circuit.
T1905 has 110V clock motor
Both white neutrals = Clock terminal
Black hot from breaker = COM
Black to load = NO [load comes on when timer turns on]

Sep 21, 2010 | Intermatic & Indoor/Outdoor Rain Tight...

1 Answer

Just brougth used maytag neptune dryer.model MDE3000AYW


If you are connecting a power cord with a 3-wire configuration, you match the corresponding wire colors from the power cord to the wires on the terminal block in the back of the dryer. The correct color-code is as follows:

RED - HOT (120VAC)
BLACK - HOT (120VAC)
WHITE - NEUTRAL (0VAC)*

*There should be a ground strap or ground wire connected to neutral at the terminal block in a 3-wire configuration.

NOTE: If the wires are not color-coded, the outer two wires (Left and Right) are the HOT leads. The center conductor is Neutral.

If you have any questions, you can refer to this link for further explanation:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3575913-installing_a_220_vac_appliance_cord

This explains the difference in 4-wire and 3-wire configurations. I hope this helps you.

Mar 09, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

240 Volts from one wire to ground.


You should have about 120v from each " I " to the " L " , and 240 across both " I " . It sounds like the " L " ( neutral ) , is getting power instead of the " I " ( line ) .

Mar 05, 2010 | Maytag Dryers

2 Answers

Dryer outlet does not have common wire.


You can replace the 4 prong with a three prog cord found at Lowes etc.

First, disconnect the black wire, one of the "hot" connections, from the left side post by removing the terminal screw. This is one-half of the 240-volt connection.
Next, disconnect the red wire, another of the "hot" connections, from the right side post by removing the terminal screw. This is the other half of the 240-volt connection.
Then, disconnect the white wire from the center connection. It is used for the neutral connection.
Now, disconnect the green wire from the machine case by unscrewing the green screw.
The next step is critical to return your electrical connection to factory condition before installng the 3-prong cord! Locate the white machine wire that is now connected to the neutral (center) screw terminal. Disconnect it from there and install it under the green ground screw.Connect the outer two wires (hot wires) to the outer two screws, obviously, one on each screw.
Now connect the center wire (neutral) to the center post. You'll notice the white machine wire is now the case ground connection, unlike the 4-prong cord connection in which the green wire from the cord makes the ground connection.

Sep 10, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

Trying to hook a 3 prong hook up with 4 prong cord how do i do it?


A 3 prong plug is for 240 volt (hot-hot-ground) the 4 prong plug is for 120/240 volt (hot-hot-neutral-ground). If your device requires a 4 prong plug, it is not a good idea to connect it to a 3 prong circuit (you will create a possible lethal electrical condition). If your device requires a 3 prong connection, a 4 prong cord can be used by not connecting the neutral (white wire). If you have any questions, let me know.

clarkco

Mar 31, 2009 | Maytag Dryers

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