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Subwoofer Issue Hooked it up to audio output on another TV and the subwoofer hums. SOunds like there is a need for another subwoofer.

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Ok,can you let me know if the reciever is working or not?

Posted on Aug 03, 2008

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How do I hook up the receiver to the subwoofer to the tv


Here's the Owner's manual -> https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.paradigm.com%2Fdownloads%2FOM-100.pdf.
There are many ways to connect the system depending on your receiver's outputs and the speakers. Usually, the TV L/R output connects to one of the receiver's inputs. The receiver's preamp sub output goes to the powered subwoofer. The receiver's FL/C/FR/SL/SR/RL/RR speaker outputs go to the respective speakers.

Mar 03, 2017 | Paradigm Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Subwoofer will not produce sound. Connections are correct. I do hear a hum or a crackel as I pull the connection on and off. AVR-689 model


In order to ensure output to your subwoofer: make sure the subwoofer is connected to the subwoofer out of your amplifier and make sure that your amplifier/receiver is set to output multi channel sound

May 07, 2011 | Denon AVR-689 Receiver

2 Answers

I hear a humming noise from my Sunfire subwoofer - occassionally. I bought a kit from Radio Shack that supposed to cut down on noise from the electric outlet - it didn't work. Please help!


How to isolate annoying background hum.

As long as the music or movie is playing, you can forget about it, at least until a quiet passage occurs, then there it is again: HUMMMMMMM! Be gone, bad hum, you think. But, like a bad odor at the back of the fridge, it takes some dogged persistence to track it down and eliminate it.

Hum is a constant low-frequency buzz, usually at about 60 Hz or 120 Hz, which results from voltage differences between true "ground" (what you'd get shoving a copper pipe into the ground) and the electrical "ground" of your receiver's chassis, the incoming cable-TV feed, or any video or audio components interconnected within your system, including powered subwoofers. When this voltage differential exists, it's called a "ground loop," and the hum it produces is darned annoying. You'll hear the hum mainly from the subwoofer because it's a low-frequency noise, but there will also be hum from your floorstanding front speakers or even compact bookshelf models.

First, try disconnecting your subwoofer from the coaxial sub cable from your AV receiver but leave the subwoofer turned on. Does the hum go away? If it does, then the ground loop is entering the system from your AV receiver and/or your cable-TV system set-top box (or satellite dish and decoder).

Disconnect the incoming TV-cable or satellite feed to a set-top box or to your TV and the A/V receiver. If the hum disappears (and you don't use a satellite dish) complain to the cable-TV company. They may know what you need and supply you with a ground-isolating transformer. If they don't know what you are talking about you'll need to order a video ground isolator and install it in-line with the TV cable before it enters your set-top cable-TV box. Axiom has special wide-band isolation transformers that will not interfere with any digital TV or HDTV signal. (N.B. You CANNOT use one of these with a satellite decoder box.)

Before you order one, you can try plugging your subwoofer into a different AC outlet in the room, ideally one that is not on the same circuit as your AV receiver and video equipment (TV, DVD player, sat or cable TV box, etc.) That may solve the problem. If it doesn't, see if the back panel of your sub has a "ground-lift screw". It will be labeled as such. Just remove it. That may remove the hum. If it doesn't and you have a standard cable-TV feed (not a dish), then order the ground-isolation transformer. (Axiom has special wide-band isolation transformers that will not interfere with any digital TV or HDTV signal.)
Axiom Audio Ground Isolator

If that still doesn't eliminate the hum, or if you use a satellite dish video feed, then you could try one of these from Radio Shack, which goes between the subwoofer and the coaxial cable from the receiver's subwoofer output.

With persistence, all ground-loop problems can be solved.

Hope it helped..

Have a nice day...

Feb 21, 2011 | Sunfire True Sub MK II Subwoofer

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After a power outage I have a loud hum.


Hi, The Ground Rules Of all the annoyances that can afflict any audio/video home theater or even a simple stereo installation, the notorious "ground loop" may well be the most difficult and persistent one to track down and eliminate. A "ground loop" is caused by the difference in electrical potential at different grounding points in an audio/video system. (All the grounds in an A/V system should ideally be at "0" potential.) A ground loop typically adds a loud low-frequency hum or buzz as soon as you plug in any of various audio or video components, including subwoofers, cable-TV outboard boxes, satellite-TV feeds, TV displays, amplifiers, A/V receivers or turntables. The buzz/hum is a byproduct of the multiple power supply cables and a ground voltage differential within your system and its network of interconnecting cables.

Here are some methods to help you get rid of ground loops. Try these first and don't waste money on a power "conditioner" which, in most cases, won't help. (There is no need to "condition" the AC power for your system. Your receiver or amplifier already has a power supply with its own filters and transformers. No further filtering is normally required.)

If you get your system up and running and hear an audible buzz or hum, the first culprit to look at is either the powered subwoofer or your cable-TV or satellite-box feed at the entry point to your system.

First, the subwoofer: unplug the coaxial cable that connects to your powered subwoofer to see if the ground-loop hum disappears. If it does, it's likely coming in through your cable/satellite TV feed.

Reconnect your subwoofer's coaxial cable from the subwoofer input to your receiver's subwoofer output and disconnect the cable-TV feed (or satellite feed) from your outboard set-top cable box or satellite tuner. Be sure and disconnect the cable before any splitters. Now see if the hum/buzz from your subwoofer stops.

If that eliminates the hum, you can install one of these inexpensive in-line ground isolators from Parts Express or Bass Home. Note that these transformer-based ground isolators will work fine with analog cable-TV feeds, but depending on their design they may interfere with or block reception of HDTV signals via a digital cable or satellite dish feed.

Install the ground isolator between the cable-TV feed and the input of your outboard cable-TV box or satellite tuner (or the TV display's antenna or cable input if you have a set with a built-in TV tuner or a cable-card ready set). In many cases, the ground isolator will "break" the loop and remove the annoying hum or buzz by isolating the TV-cable ground.

If a hum remains with the TV cable completely disconnected from your system, or you don't want to risk degrading reception of HD signals from a cable or satellite system, then you may have to add a ground isolator like this Radio Shack Model 270-054 between the line-level coaxial subwoofer cable from your A/V receiver and the line-level input jack on your powered subwoofer.

In all cases, if your subwoofer has a ground-lift screw like some of Axiom's subwoofers, try first removing the screw (or replacing it) to see if it increases or eliminates the hum. It may or may not make a difference.

If you do not have easy access to the aforementioned ground isolators, here are a few more tips:

Try plugging the subwoofer into a different AC outlet in the room, one that isn't supplying power to your components (A/V receiver, TV, cable box, etc.). That might fix it.

Try reversing the AC plug for your A/V receiver or the powered subwoofer. If it's a 3-wire plug or a polarized plug, which has one prong wider than the other, you won't be able to reverse the plug. For safety, do not use a "cheater plug" to bypass the 3-wire plug.

With the power OFF, reverse the AC plugs one by one of any other components that have a standard 2-prong AC plug that isn't polarized. Each time you reverse a plug, turn on the system with the attached component and your subwoofer and see if the hum disappears. In some cases, reversing one or more plugs will eliminate the hum.

If you have a turntable, try connecting a separate ground wire to a chassis screw on your preamp or receiver and see if the hum disappears. If you already have a turntable ground wire, try removing it from the preamp. One or the other may eliminate the hum.

Finally, here is another solution that worked well for a member of our message boards who decided to discard his ground-loop isolator on his subwoofer: "I took off the ground-loop isolator I'd been using and connected a plain 14-gauge wire to chassis screws on the sub and the receiver then powered everything on. Although hum was still there, it was far lower than before. Next I unscrewed the ground-loop screw on the back of the sub and that took care of the hum completely."

Almost certainly sounds like an earth loop to me, but can be caused by a poorly made transformer or phase shifts on the mains supply. Visit some power conditioner web-sites like Isotek or Isol-8 (or google "earth loop") where there's plenty of advice on how to reduce/eliminate earth loops and other causes of mains-induced hum (transformer problems etc).

Hum on the speakers usually indicates that there is a DC voltage on the speaker line. DC voltage on the output lines would be caused by a shorted output transistor.


Have a nice day...

Feb 16, 2011 | Cambridge Soundworks BassCube 12 Speaker

1 Answer

Subwoofer hum from STR-DH800


That points pretty much to a bad shield on the cable. Have you tried another one? Another thing to try is to rotate the AC power cord on the sub (if it has one). Sorry, too lazy to look it up.

Dec 29, 2009 | Sony STR-DH800

1 Answer

My Polk PSW 303 subwoofer emits a hum when plugged in and powered off. When the unit is turned on the hum gets louder. At this point the unit is useless. Does anyone know what could be causing this?


Hiya sounds alot like there is a power supply issue with the unit that will require repair for it to be doing off or on. Probably wont be to expensive, request a quote first to make sure viable.

Best of luck

Jul 16, 2009 | Polk Audio PSW-303 Subwoofer

1 Answer

Hooking up my Digital audio subwoofers


How did you connect it to your receiver?

Jun 14, 2009 | Mirage LF100 Subwoofer

1 Answer

Connection a JBL surround cinema speakers with sub to a Yamaha


if you do not have the digital hook up from the tv to the reciever
304c659.gif then you will not get the subwoofer sounds or the dolby digital sounds
if you don't have this on your tv then just turn off the dolby digital when watching the tv , and you should be able to hear the subwoofer thru the virtual surround sound
hope this info is worth a fixya and if you need other help then just ask me and
i'll be glad to help

electech

Nov 23, 2008 | Yamaha HTR-5850 Receiver

2 Answers

SA-AX720 no subwoofer signal?


THIS UNIT HAS NO SUB WOOFER AMP IN IT. THE ONLY WAY TO OVER COME THIS IS TO HOOK THE LEFT AND RIGHT FRONT SPEAKERS STRAIGHT TO THE SUB WOOFER AND THEN GO FROM THE SUB WOOFER BACK TO THE INPUTS ON THE BACK OF THE UNIT FOR THE FRONT SPEAKERS. THE SUB WOOFER THIS WAY WILL EXTRACT THE BASS AND THE FRONT WILL RECEIVE THEIR PART. THIS SOUNDS CRAZY AS HELL I KNOW BUT THAT'S HOW I GOT MINE TO WORK. THE OUTPUT FOR THE SUBWOOFER IS USELESS AND PUT THERE FOR YOU TO HOOK UP AN AMP FOR A SUB WOOFER. EVERYTHING HAS SHORT COMINGS, AND THAT'S THE ONE FOR THE AX-720.

Sep 22, 2008 | Technics SA-AX720 Receiver

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