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My Ar Sub used to work just fine until my wife's dog ran into the two RCA jacks going into the sub. Now I can't get any sound out of the sub except a hum. I replaced the male RCA jacks with new ones on the line coming from the reciever but still nothing but a hum. Any ideas?

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  • petelindberg Mar 24, 2011

    The problem is that my subwoofer does not put out sound from the reciever when movies or music are playing, only a low 60 Hz hum. The wiring has been checked and is fine, is it something in the subwoofer electronics?

  • petelindberg Mar 30, 2011

    Had sub checked out at a repair shop and everything is fine. What about reciever Sub output jack, how to check that?

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  • Master
  • 8,546 Answers

I just noticed this is 9 days old and I can't see what, if anything, was offered already.

Let's approach this from each end, one at a time.

At the sub: Does it hum with NO cables going into it? If so, it has its own shielding issue.

If not, connect the RCA cables at its end only. Hum? One or more of the cables is an antenna. Connect each at the receiver end. Hum gone? Good. The shields and grounds work. Still hums? Isolate the bad cable.

With power OFF...

If Fido's actions stressed the jacks at either end you may have cracked a shield (minus) on one or more of them. If you have an ohmmeter, disconnect the RCA cables and measure from the shield (outer ring) of each RCA jack to the shield of another unrelated jack. It should be a dead short. Maybe even plug ONE END of a trustworthy RCA cable into the jack you're testing and wiggle it to see if anything changes. Isolate the cause.

Measure end-to-end the positives of each cable (dead short), the negatives (dead short) and between the tip and ring at each end (infinity). Again, manipulation of the cable my produce variations if a conductor is cracked or broken.

Posted on Mar 30, 2011

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  • Master
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Check your sub's circuit board and try with replacing both two RCA jacks that are connected with the sum. The problem may be in the board, check whether it is ok, or repair it.

Posted on Mar 24, 2011

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  • Master
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Hi,things you'll need:

* An extention cord long enough to reach from the amplifiers to the mixer.

Hum is usually the result of using electrial outlets with different grounds. To verify this, run an extension cord from the outlet that the amplifiers are plugged in, to the mixer.

Remove all the DI boxes and adaptors. Connect the mixer to the amplifiers with balanced cables.

Be sure that all your cables and connectors are correctly wired:

Pin 1 shield
Pin 2 + white/red
Pin 3 - black

Note: If the system has an electronic crossover, equalizer, or limiter....you need to keep them in the signal chain to protect the system from damage. Just make sure all the cables are balanced and the pin-out on the connectors is correct.

If your gear doesn't have balanced connections use good shielded cables with the proper connectors.... NO ADAPTORS!!!

If the system still has noise, check each channel on the mixer by removing the input connections. There may be a DI box on stage that is also interacting and causing a ground loop. If that is the case try a different DI and make sure that all the instruments and amps on stage are also on the same dedicated ground as the mixer and amplifiers.


If the hum is gone using the extention cord you will need the have your electrician run a dedicated ground to the mixer and amplifier electrical plugs.

Try getting a more secure ground first...not on the sub but on the other end of the wire, attach it to the plug terminal and or to a radiator or the floor, to get a true ground, if you detach it it may work fine for a while and then somewhere down the line you could get damage...be sure you use a surge suppressor and that not all the equipment is plugged into the same outlet...

Posted on Mar 22, 2011

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1 Answer

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Some weeks ago the sub stopped working. Thought dog had chewed the coaxial driver cable, but not shorted (now). Tried another sub w/o success.


Hi, I went to the Denon website and they have no documentation there for your receiver.
But do not frown, I have some good suggestions for you.
0 Don't beat the dog. After all, it's their job to chew things.
1 Get a new, un-chewed cable and see what happens between the sub output and the sub woofer. If it works, your in business. If it does not work. Don't be discouraged . Go to step #2
2 If the sub output on the Denon has failed, and everything else is good. There is another way to use your sub.
Install a patch system using the Headphone output from the front of the Denon. It may seem odd, but it works exceptionally well for the following reasons. It works on all signal sources. So if you are not playing a home theater source, you still have the use of your sub.
You will need the following adapters.
1 A Male stereo phone jack to female mini-phone jack. (Something that would accept typical small headphone sets such as those on an iphone).
2 A stereo "Y" connector that that has a single stereo male mini-phone jack that has two "RCA" female jacks.
3 A simple RCA male to male stereo cable pair as is commonly used to connect CD players, etc. i.e. separate red and white RCA connectors at both ends.
1 and 2 above may be available as a single unit combined with each other.
Take these adapters and connect the Item 1 into the Receiver, Item 2 plugged into Item 1, Item 3 plugged into Item 2 and finally the other end of Item 3 plugged into the two female RCA jacks mounted onto the back of the sub-woofer. If the sub only has one female RCA connector, get a RCA "Y" connector that has a single male end to 2 female ends.
This setup will work perfectly with any sub. The reason is as follows. Most decent subs have an adjustable high frequency cut off. So you can vary it from about 20Hz up to about 140 Hz.
I recommend that it is cut off at 80 hz. This way the bass transition is usually seamless between the woofer and the rest of the system. .
Then adjust the woofer volume control in a similar manner.
If it all works out, give the dog a treat and enjoy yourself.
I really hope this helps, I love my sub woofer as well.
Let me know how this turns out.
If you have any questions please post them on the site and I'll get back to you ASAP.
Best Regards,
Mark

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2 Answers

Well I also have a S112PS AR Sub Woofer Problem...


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To eliminate mis-settings or lack of sub-related signal upstream, plug an RCA cable from a CD player directly into it and start a CD that fades in slowly because you won't have any way to lower the volume except to pause the CD. If the sub works you'll hear a muffled version of the program.

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Yes you can modify RCA cables to make bare wire tails.
If the unit has a sub o/p then you just connect up your sub bass unit to whatever the amp needs.

An RCA cable is 2 wire which is all you would normally need for sub bass speaker level signal.
It may be a good idea to eventually upgrade the wire size if you want really good sub bass as lower frequencies draw more current and so require more copper.

Please let me know if this any help, thanks for using FixYa.



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