Question about Lexmark JetPrinter Z22 Color InkJet

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Have no power cable - Lexmark JetPrinter Z22 Color InkJet

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  • LXK Chris
    LXK Chris Mar 24, 2011

    It's kind of old already, it may be difficult to look for that item. You could try to search for it in some retail stores. Or maybe it's time for you to upgrade your printer now.

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Ebay search it

Posted on Feb 12, 2013

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P3 DVD connector


Well........................

The numbering for power supply cables, differs from one pre-built computer manufacturer, to the next.

GENERALLY, a P3 power cable is a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

(Also misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable.
Molex came out with the design for the power cable CONNECTOR.
The name stuck. Kinda' like calling an adjustable open-end wrench, a 'Crescent wrench' )

A P4 power cable is usually a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This power cable was brought out to provide more power for the motherboard, and specifically the Processor. (CPU)
Does NOT connect to an optical drive. (CD/DVD drive)

DOES need to be connected to motherboard though, because it is POWER for the Processor!

Moving on.............

Let's dispense with the antiquated numbering of the power cables, and show you the real information you need;

There are two types of Optical Drives out there, currently being used;
1) IDE. Also known as PATA.

2) SATA

An IDE optical drive will use a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Note the rounded corners on top.
When plugging in one of these power cables, just always remember the rounded corners go on TOP.

The data cable used is a flat IDE ribbon cable. These are general examples,

Illustration,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nappe.svg

Photo,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ATA_cables.jpg

I would like you to look at the connector end, and specifically the Locating Lug on one side of the connector,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PATA-cable.jpg

This style of Locating Lug consists of two small 'bars'.
There are types where it is filled in. Just one solid lug.

The Locating Lug lines up with a Cutout, on the optical drive.
(Or IDE/PATA harddrive)

IF, there is no Locating Lug on your IDE/PATA flat ribbon cable, post back in a Comment.
I will show you the proper way to connect it, using the Red stripe on the side of the cable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_ATA

If you have a SATA optical drive, it uses a SATA power cable.
This is a general example,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

Between the SATA data cable connector, and the SATA power cable connector; the SATA power cable connector is the larger of the two.

SATA data cable connector has 7 contact pins.
SATA power cable connector has 15-pin.

This is an example of a SATA data cable, and it's respective connector,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SATA_ports.jpg

Note the L-shaped opening. The SATA power cable also has this L-shaped opening.

Observe the SATA data cable connector examples, on the motherboard.
Note the L shape.

(Note: The SATA data cable connectors on YOUR motherboard, may differ in style.
The ones shown (Red) are an Open design.
There are styles that are Enclosed. Have an oval around the
L shape)

To install the cable connector, line the L-shaped opening, with the L shape on the optical drive connector.

Tip: Turn this L over to the left, then turn upside down.
The small 'foot' of the L, always points DOWN, when installing connector.


The SATA data cable connector, that plugs into the optical drive, should be a 90 degree bent elbow.
The connector end that plugs into the motherboard, should be a Straight connector.

The SATA power cable connector, and the SATA data cable connector; MAY have a Lock on top.
Usually a small depression, or Tab, or 'bulb'.
Depress with your thumb tip, to install, or remove the cable.

(Hmmm, betting now the P3 power cable may be a SATA power cable.

How'd I do? Post back in a Comment)

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 02, 2013 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

Widetech the max psu update, now black screen on monitor


Kind of hard to give you a cable diagram, Roslyn, when you haven't stated what motherboard manufacturer and model number.

Or computer manufacturer and model number.
(Back of computer next to Windows product key; or up on side of computer tower )

So we'll wing it..............

Widetech the Max. A modular line of Power Supplies.

1) Main power cable;
It will be either a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The WTM (Widetech the Max) will have a braided thick cable, that will have a 20-pin connector, and a 4-pin connector.
Looks like this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

The 20-pin connector, and the 4-pin connector, should have a white arrow on the side. The arrows point to each other, when the two connectors are properly aligned with each other.

So, ATX main power cable plugs into Power Supply, (If removable), and 20 + 4-pin connector plugs into motherboard.

When the hooked end of the Lock, on the side of the power cable's connector; is over the Tab on the motherboard connector; the power cable is deemed to be plugged in properly, and tightly.

Note*
Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
Black wires are Ground wires. (Also are Negative)

Note that the extra 4-pin power cable, that attaches with the 20-pin ATX power cable; has TWO Yellow wires, a Red wire, and a Black wire.
This way you don't accidentally somehow, plug the following power cable, in with the 20-pin ATX main power cable,


2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable:

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

When Processors started using more power, than just the processor socket (Motherboard) could deliver, this power cable was brought out to help carry the load.

Note*
TWO Yellow 12 volt wires, and TWO Black ground wires.

3) 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable:

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Brought out for motherboards supporting multiple Processors, (CPU's), such as a server computer; but with processors needing more, and more power; is used quite frequently by motherboard manufacturers now.

NOTICE the power wires. The color code of the insulation of the wires.
FOUR Yellow wires (12 Volt), and FOUR Black wires. (Ground)
NOT to be mixed up with the following power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

This baby plugs into a GRAPHICS CARD (Video Card. Same/same)
A PCI Express graphics card, IF it uses one.

The PCI-Express x16 slot on the motherboard, is only capable of delivering 75 Watts.
This power cable can deliver UP TO an additional 150 Watts.

It is an upgrade of this power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out, to provide more power for a graphics card.

75 Watts.

So now you have the PCI-Express x16 slot on the motherboard capable of 75 Watts, and the 6-pin PCI Express power cable capable of 75 Watts; for a total of 150 Watts available for a graphics card.

PCI-Express x16 slot on motherboard, and 8-pin PCI Express power cable?

225 Watts.

This power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps4plus4

Is for a motherboard that uses a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, OR an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
Is a combined power cable if needed, just like the 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

This power cable is a SATA power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

Used to plug into a Harddrive, or Optical Drive. (CD/DVD drive)

NOTE*
IF your SATA harddrive has a provision on the back; to plug in EITHER a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin Peripheral power cable; ONLY use the SATA power cable.

Using BOTH power cables will burn up the harddrive. May not happen immediately, but I ASSURE you it will happen.

4-pin Peripheral power cable, is also erroneously known as a 'Molex' power cable.
Molex was the first company with the CONNECTOR design. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an adjustable open-end wrench, a Crescent wrench,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

[ IDE (PATA) harddrive shown in photo. Not a SATA harddrive ]

Note that between a SATA power cable, and a SATA data cable; the SATA power cable's connector is longer.
SATA power cable connector has 15-pins.
SATA data cable's connector has 7-pins,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SATA_ports.jpg

Note the L-shaped opening of the SATA data cable's connector; and the L-shape of the motherboard connector.
The SATA power cable has the same L-shaped opening.

NOTE that color of connectors does NOT matter.
Could be green with pink polka dots.
It is the wire color code, and connector SHAPE, that matters.

[Applies to ALL cables, and connectors}

Sometimes the SATA power cable, and SATA data cable connectors; have a lock on them.
May not see it very well. It is usually a slightly raised bump on the connector. This is depressed with a thumb nail to unlock.

Unlock WHEN installing, and removing.

ALWAYS use the connector when plugging in, or unplugging a cable.
DO NOT pull on the wires.
(Even if you have to stand on your head, and whistle 'Dixie')

I lay the computer opening side UP, on a static free towel, on a table. Much easier to get to the cabling.

ONLY plug in the cables you need, to the Power Supply.
That's what Modular cabling is all about.
Gives more room when not using unnecessary cables, and more air flow through the computer case; for cooling.

I just installed a ThermalTake TR2 600 power supply. It is Modular Cabling also.

I'm willing to bet you didn't plug the Processor (CPU) power cable in.
Either a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, OR an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

Make sure the Ram Memory is seated tightly also.
It get's bumped loose when installing a Power Supply.
No,.....you CANNOT just visually inspect, and let it go at that.

You HAVE to remove ALL ram memory modules ('Stick'), and plug them back in again; to be ASSURED that they/it are seated tightly, and correctly.

Well that about does it for me kid, post back in a Comment if you have additional questions.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 01, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

M3A770DE 4 pin


Due to the 'large expanse' of information you posted I can barely contain myself.

1) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, that plugs into the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Note that this power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.

Back in the day there was no additional power cable needed, for the motherboard.
When the Intel Pentium 4 came out, the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable came out also.

Power for the Processor.

More, and more powerful hardware components for the motherboard, (Processor and graphics card), required more power to the motherboard.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

This power cable was used to connect directly to a graphics card, and provide power to it.

Note that this power cable has THREE Yellow 12 Volt wires.
It can carry up to 75 Watts of power.

Still wasn't enough power TO the motherboard, and TO the graphics card, with the new hardware component technology being brought out.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Note that this power cable has FOUR Yellow 12 Volt wires.
Is capable of providing up to 150 Watts.

A PCI Express x16 slot is capable of providing 75 Watts.

Note the shape of the sockets in the connector.
Now compare to an 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

DO NOT confuse the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
They are NOT the same.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector on the motherboard, is at the top left corner of the Processor socket, and close to the outside edge of the motherboard.

(With motherboard installed in computer case)

You can use the motherboard with just a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

Look at the LOCK on the side of the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector.

With that Lock AWAY from you, or on the opposite side of the connector, a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in on the RIGHT side.

If you have a powerful graphics card installed in your
PCI Express x16 -> slot/S, you had definitely better use a Power Supply that has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

This is a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable.
{ Molex was the first to design and produce this style of power cable CONNECTOR. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an open-end wrench a Crescent wrench }

IF you use an adapter power cable; Use TWO 4-pin standard Peripheral power cables!!
You need those Yellow 12 Volt wires.

What will happen if you do not use two?

1) The PCI Express x16 slot/s will burn.

2) The gold plated contact pins on the PCI Express graphics card, or cards, will burn.

3) If the graphics card, or graphics cards, require a power cable connected to them;
A) The connections on the graphics card for the power cable will burn.

B) The power cable connector will burn.

Other than that the only other 4-pin references on the motherboard, that I can see, is the optical drive's 4-pin audio cable connector on the motherboard, (CD1), and the CPU (Processor) Fan 4-pin connector on the motherboard.

For additional questions, or if the above is not what you seek, post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 08, 2012 | Asrock M3A770DE ATX AM3 AMD770 DDR3...

1 Answer

Gateway dx4822-01 power supply


Gateway DX4822 Desktop PC,

http://support.gateway.com/us/en/product/default.aspx?tab=1&modelId=2291

Just a regular Ol' ATX power supply. Rated at a maximum wattage rating of 300 to 525 Watts. Two different power supply options offered.

Power Supply case size is;
6 Inches Wide, by 5-1/2 Inches Long, by 3-1/4 Inches Tall. (152.4mm Wide, by 139.7mm Long, by 82.55mm Tall )

Has the following power cables;

A) 1 -> 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[ NOTE* Color of connector on power cable, OR motherboard, does NOT matter.

Proper connector, proper power cable, DOES matter; connector color does not matter ]

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

{ Power to the motherboard, and all components connected to it }

C) 2 or more -> SATA power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

{ Power to a SATA harddrive, and/or power to SATA optical drive/s.
(CD/DVD drive) Or power for an upgrade in the future, for a SATA optical drive }

D) 3 or more -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

{ Power for an IDE (PATA) harddrive, or drives. Also power for IDE (PATA) optical drive/s. Plus power in some instances, for computer case fans }

E) Two or more Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

{ Listed as a Floppy Drive power cable. Back in the day when the article was written, such was true.
It can still be used for a Floppy Drive, but is more used now as a power cable for a;
1) Card Reader.
2) Computer case fans (IF needed }

It's name is Small 4-pin Peripheral power cable. It is smaller than it's larger cousin, the Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

Also has smaller gauge of wiring. This means it cannot carry the same amperage, as the standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

I would recommend this,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899124&CatId=1483

A) 1 -> 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.
Can be used as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable, which is what you need.

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

C) 6 -> SATA power cables

D) 4 -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables

E) 1 -> Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables

F) 1 -> 6-pin PCI Express power cable

G) 1 -> 6/8-pin PCI Express power cable.

In the future, (Or now if you have one), you can upgrade to a better graphics card, that needs an additional power cable, IF you wish.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable.

You also have a 6-pin or 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
(6/8-pin PCI Express power cable)

All the pins can be used together, and make an 8-pin PCI Express power cable, for a very powerful graphics card that requires this cable.

Just added bonuses with today's modern power supply's.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jul 04, 2012 | Gateway DX4822-01 Power Supply 575 Watt...

1 Answer

I have installed two diferent graphics card, #1 was MSI 5459 and #2 was a Nvidia GeForce 250. Bth ran fine afor a short period of tme #1 for a month an #2 for about 2 weeks. After these periods of time...


I don't find the MSI 5459 graphics card, William.
Am familiar with the Nvidia GeForce 250 GTS, though.

Using the GeForce GTS 250 as an example, the graphics card requires a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable, for additional power, along with the power it gets from the PCI-Express x16 slot it is in.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

The unit is furnished with an adapter power cable, that converts 2 Molex power cables, (4-pin Peripheral power cables, actually), into 1 PCI-Express 6-pin power cable.

Note that the 6-pin PCI-Express power cable, has two Yellow wires in it.

Let's look at a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Note there is one Yellow wire, one Red wire, and two Black wires.

The Red wire is a 5 Volt wire, and not used by the adapter power cable.

The two Black wires are Ground wires, and only one is used by the adapter power cable.

The Yellow wire is a 12 Volt wire, and is used by the adapter power cable.

The 6-pin PCI-Express power cable requires TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.
(And three Black Ground wires)

This means Two 4-pin Peripheral power cables MUST be used.

Failure to use two 4-pin Peripheral power cables, to that adapter power cable, means the GeForce GS 250 is NOT receiving enough power.

This will burn the connection at the graphics card, burn the adapter power cable connector, and burn the PCI-Express x16 slot it is sitting in.

Takes time, but will happen.

Could this be what you have done?

It also requires 150 Watts all by itself. You need more power for the rest of the computer.

(The 6-pin PCI-Express power cable is designed to provide up to 75 Watts of power. This means 75 Watts of power, also comes from the PCI-Express x16 slot, it is sitting in)

Nvidia GeForce GTS 250,

http://techreport.com/articles.x/16504

For additional questions post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 20, 2012 | HEWLETT-PACKARD HEWLETT RECERTIFIED...

1 Answer

SMPS CONNECTION DIAGRAM


Not a problem, but it would be handier to have the manufacturer Name, and Model Number.

(Back of computer on a sticker, next to the Windows product key, or up on the side of the computer tower )


SMPS = Switched-Mode Power Supply. The style used in personal computers now,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

A) Main power cable:
There are three styles;

1) The old AT style that has two separate connectors. The connectors BOTH connectors have BLACK wires towards one side.

The connectors also have ONLY one way, (Direction), they can be plugged onto the motherboard.
This is due to the Lock, and Locating Tab on the motherboard connector/s, and the main power cables connector/s.

When you can plug the connectors on the motherboard, with both connector's BLACK wires facing each other, (They will be in the middle), you have them installed correctly,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#oldpc

2) The newer ATX style. Uses one power cable, and connector.
First style to come out was the 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, has a LOCK on one side.
This Lock locks over a Locating Tab, on the female motherboard connector.

To remove this power cable you squeeze in on the Top of the Lock.
The Lock operates like a see-saw on a playground. When you squeeze the top in, you remove it's hooked end away, from the Locating Tab of the motherboard connector.

To be ensured that this cable is plugged in tightly, and correctly, the Lock's hooked end will be over the Locating Tab, on the motherboard connector.

3) The newest style is the 24-pin ATX main power cable.
As computer hardware evolved, and became better, it demanded more power.
The extra 4 pins of the 24-pin ATX main power cable provided this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[ Aftermarket power supply manufacturers, provide power supply's with a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable, usually.
You can use it as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or use the additional 4 pin cable, and use it as a 24-pin ATX main power cable ]

4) Motherboard didn't provide enough power for newer Processors.
The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was brought out.
(Has Lock with Locating Tab on the motherboard connector, also)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

5) Motherboard didn't provide enough power for high-end graphics card.
4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable didn't help.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

Plugs into a graphics card.

[ Note*
In all power cables, Red wires are 5 Volts. Yellow wires are 12 Volts. ALL Black wires are Ground wires ]

Next in line was two versions of the 8-pin power cable.

A) 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
Originally brought out for server computers, that has multiple Processors.
Plugs into the motherboard.

B) 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
Brought out for more power, than a 6-pin PCI Express power cable could put out.
Plugs into a graphics card.

(6-pin PCI Express power cable is capable of handling 75 Watts.
8-pin PCI Express power cable will handle 150 Watts )

If you have an IDE (PATA) harddrive, a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable is what you need. ('Molex' is the slang term for it's connector)

If you have a SATA harddrive you need a 15-pin SATA power cable.

NOTE*
IF, your SATA harddrive has a provision for a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, AND a SATA power cable;

ONLY USE the SATA power cable!

If you use both you will burn out the harddrive. Maybe not immediately, but I assure you down the road you will.
(Do not use just a single 4-pin standard peripheral power cable, either)

Optical drive/s use a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, if they are IDE (PATA) units.
If they are SATA units they use a SATA power cable.

The old Floppy Drives use a 4-pin small Peripheral power cable.
Same cable plugs into a Card Reader, also.

The plastic front of your computer is the Front Panel.

The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the cables, (Wires), from the Front Panel go to, is the Front Panel header.

Sometimes abbreviated on the motherboard as;
F_PANEL 1, or FP1, etc.

I will need to know the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number, (HP = Product Number, or P/N), or the manufacturer name, and Model Number of the motherboard, to TRY to provide this information.

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 12, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Atx motherboard wiring diagram


For the power cables from the Power Supply? Or Power Supply, and Front Panel header on the motherboard?

For both of these you need to state the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number.
Post back in a Comment.


If you just wish a generic, one-size-fits-all explanation;

A) 20 or 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The older computers use a 20-pin ATX main power cable. As computers needed more power to the motherboard, the 24-pin ATX main power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Scroll the page down for info on the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

[ Much older motherboards (AT) used two main power cables. { In the link - Original PC main power cables} ]


B) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
Was brought out because Processors needed more power, than the 24-pin ATX main power cable feeding the motherboard, could deliver.

Power for the Processor,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4


C) 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable
Commonly misnomered as 'Molex'.

Molex was a model name given by the first manufacturer, of this design of power cable connector.
The name stuck. Kind of like referring to an adjustable open-end wrench as a Crescent wrench.

It is also referred to as a 4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable, because there are two styles of 4-pin Peripheral power cables.

4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Generally used for IDE (PATA) harddrives, and IDE optical drives.


4-pin Small Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

Older computers used it for power to the Floppy Drive. It's generally used now to provide power for a Card Reader.

Note that both types of connectors use the same power wires, and 2 ground wires.
Yellow is 12 Volts
Red is 5 Volts
Black is Ground

[ Also, in the ATX main power cable:
Orange is 3.3 Volts, the Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. Abbreviated as PS_ON.

Power Supply plugged into power, the Soft Power On wire is briefly touched to ANY Ground wire. This is bypassing the Power On switch.
If the computer (Power Supply) comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.
IF the computer (Power Supply) does NOT come on, you have a bad Power Supply ]

(ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They all lead back to one central Ground point.
ALL power wires lead back to one point in the power supply, for EACH power wire.

The 12 Volt power wires, (Yellow), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 12 Volt power rail.

The 5 Volt power wires, (Red), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 5 Volt power rail.

The 3.3 Volt power wires, (Orange), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 3.3 Volt power rail ]

D) SATA power cable
15-pin power cable for SATA harddrives, and SATA optical drives,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

[ The smaller 7-pin SATA connector is the interface cable, or data cable.

IF, you have a SATA harddrive that has a provision for a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable.

It will burn out the harddrive if you use both. It may not do it right away, but eventually it will.
I have had people state over the years, that they were using both power cables. Came back two months later to tell me their harddrives had burned out ]

More to follow in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 30, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Is there a schematic somewhere that shows how to plug these things in? I may be short a cord Thanks! Jack


First thing to plug in are the Power Supply cables.

The main one to start with is the ATX main power cable.
There are two main variations of the ATX main power cable.

The 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

,and the 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The 20-pin version was used on the older model computers. It was found that more power was needed to the motherboard due to newer computer components, and four extra power wires were added.

In the center photo note the lock on the side of the connector. It operates in a see-saw fashion. The top is squeezed in, to release the hook of the lock from a tab on the female connector, on the motherboard. Then the male connector can be removed from the connector on the motherboard.

Depending on the motherboard you may also have a 4-pin ATX +12 volt power cable. This is additional power to the motherboard, and is mostly used to provide additional power to a Processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Note the lock on the side of the connector. It operates in the same fashion as the ATX main power cable's connector.

Peripheral devices inside the computer also require a power cable.
If you have an IDE, (Also known as PATA), harddrive it will require a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable.
Commonly misnomered as a Molex power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

This power cable is also used on IDE type optical drives. CD or DVD.
It can also be used along with an adapter cable to power a computer case fan.
There is no lock, but there is only one direction the cable will plug in.
There are two rounded corners on one side of the plug to line it up.

On all power cables use the connector itself to unplug the cable, Not the wires!

(Sometimes unplugging a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable is tough.
The connector is rocked side to side while removing.
Sometimes an additional tool is needed to EASE the connector out.
In all cases make sure the computer is unplugged from power BEFORE working on it, and assure that you are following Anti-Static Precautions)

You may have a SATA harddrive, and also you may have SATA optical drives. (CD or DVD drive)
They use a SATA power cable.
The SATA power cable has 15 pins.

[Note a SATA data cable has 7 pins. It is the shorter of the two cable connectors]

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

NOTE*
IF you have a SATA harddrive that has provisions on the back of the unit, to plug BOTH a SATA power cable, and a standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable!

Using both power cables will burn out the harddrive.
Sometimes it doesn't happen right away, but it eventually will.

The last power cable I will mention here is the 4-pin small Peripheral power cable.
On older computers this power cable was used on a Floppy Drive.
Now more used to provide power for a Card Reader.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

Additional information to be included in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

May 29, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Where do I connect the SATA power cable to on the motherboard


Only the SATA data cable connects to the motherboard, the SATA power cable is connected to a cable from the Power Supply Unit (PSU) if you do not have any of the SATA power cables on your PSU you can get MOLEX to SATA power cable converters (MOLEX is the "fan power connecters")

Mar 28, 2011 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

Does dimension 2400 support SATA DVD player


No, not directly. There is no SATA header, (Connector), on the motherboard, and you have no SATA power cable on your power supply.

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim2400/en/sm_en/techov.htm

HOWEVER, you can buy, and install a SATA Adapter Card, and use a SATA adapter cable, on a certain power cable you have already.

The SATA adapter card goes into any available, (Open), PCI expansion slot on your motherboard.
(White slot on motherboard)

This is an example, (Not an advertisement for said manufacturer, nor website),

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2329305&CatId=1455

You will also need a SATA data cable, to hook that SATA DVD player up to a SATA adapter card.
(7-pin connector on each end of the cable)

As said, you can convert a certain power cable on your power supply into a SATA power cable. (15-pin connector, on the SATA end of the cable)

The power cable is a Peripheral power cable. It will have a 4-pin Molex connector on the end.

If you have an unused Peripheral power cable, an adapter power cable plugs onto it. The other end of the cable has the SATA power connector. (15-pin)

Will give examples of a Peripheral power cable, and a SATA adapter cable, in an additional comment.

Jan 24, 2010 | Dell Dimension 2400 PC Desktop

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